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59 of 63 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE ULTIMATE NOSTALGIA TRIP FOR Gen-Xers
READY PLAYER ONE is one great piece of literature, a book that not only will get hold of you from page one and never let go but it will also speak directly to your soul. At the same time though, Gen-Xers will have the time of their life in a nostalgia trip of the 1980's like no other.

Wade Watts is an 18-year old orphan living with his heartless aunt in a...
Published on 3 Sept. 2011 by NeuroSplicer

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Retro-Futuristic
This work is caught in a double-bind. It reads like a young adult's novel, complete with an ordinary, slightly overweight teenager whose avatar becomes a cyber-hero in the virtual gaming universe called the OASIS, against a harsh futuristic dystopian landscape. However, the pop culture references littered across the pages with admirable ease (that would send any 80s...
Published 20 months ago by J. Ang


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59 of 63 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE ULTIMATE NOSTALGIA TRIP FOR Gen-Xers, 3 Sept. 2011
By 
NeuroSplicer (Freeside, in geosynchronous orbit) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Ready Player One (Paperback)
READY PLAYER ONE is one great piece of literature, a book that not only will get hold of you from page one and never let go but it will also speak directly to your soul. At the same time though, Gen-Xers will have the time of their life in a nostalgia trip of the 1980's like no other.

Wade Watts is an 18-year old orphan living with his heartless aunt in a stacked trailer park. He is obese and suffers from acme and severe lack of social skills but to him it matters little because he is almost always online, getting schooled and hanging out with his friends on a massively multiplayer online environment named OASIS.

OASIS consists of a virtually endless number of worlds, some magical, others cyberpunk and yet others approximating the real world. OASIS is a huge success as in 2044, when the gap between the rich and the poor has grown into an unbridgeable chasm and all of the fossil fuels are gone (but not the environmental problems their abuse caused), life is bleak for the great majority of humanity. The only sane refuse is to get lost in this digital heaven.

When James Halliday, the insanely rich and eccentric creator of OASIS, dies he wills his multi-billion company to the first person who will discover the three keys he Easter-egged into his digital universe. So the worldwide stampede of egg-hunters (known as gunters) starts off, people searching for the ultimate video game prize. Their only clues are Halliday's video message and known 80's fixation. With such a global race, a race that takes the masses back to simpler and happier times, the 80's come back in fashion.

Early video games, taking their first steps just out of the primordial sea and capturing the imagination of an entire generation with only some blinking pixels. Classic RolePlaying Games with dungeon crawling, looting, re-equiping and leveling up. Sit-coms of unique determined optimism, springing from an era of a growing economy and reigned-in capitalism. SciFi TV series offering immersion that was never again replicated. Toys and gadgets that sprung from instances of pure genius. Movies so epic in scope and impact that one developed blind-spots to their cheesy props and plot holes.

Like a good 80's pop-culture narrative the hero (known by his handle of Parzival) has companions (Aech and Art3mis, Shoto and Daito), he has to face powerful villains (Sorrento and his army of Sixers), overcome insurmountable obstacles and find his destiny. A classic piece of literature that will find its rightful place in the 21st century canon.

The pop-cultural zeigeist shows a strong geek-chic bias lately but even if the 80's were before your time or you never played any MMOGs or even any video games you will still love this book. You will not want to miss a single line of code, you will more fun than Ferris Bueller on his day off and, when done, you will feel the urge to start it all over again. And again.
Because you too will ask yourself: did Ernest write this book especially for me or is the gravity tag of the pop-culture during our teenage years so powerful we have all unknowingly turned into its image?

Can you hear the 28K modem screeching its connecting handshake in the background?

WITH MY HIGHEST RECOMMENDATIONS!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended, 7 Feb. 2013
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This review is from: Ready Player One (Paperback)
Reading the reviews and the book blurb, most of you are going to think -it doesn't sound like something I'd enjoy. I'm not a gamer, and I didn't grow up in the 80's.
Ignore all that and immerse yourself in this excellent novel set in 2044 where everyone spends most of there time in a virtual world called OASIS, Our hero Wade Watts is looking for the clues to find the 'golden egg' and the fortune of the now dead creator of the OASIS world. He must find 3 keys and 3 gates and undergo a series of tests to progress and win the prize ahead of the corporate monsters striving to change OASIS into a money making machine.
This is one of the most fun and exciting books I've read this year.
Once you start reading this you simply will not want to put it down, the story flows very well and is very entertaining, the only slight criticism would be the seemingly quick ending. The tension could have been built better and the final challenge should have played out longer.
That said, I did read it in 4 sittings it reads quickly like a movie and will definitely make a fantastic movie when and if it eventually gets made.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure nostalgic joy., 10 Nov. 2013
By 
E. Motler "ed_motler" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Ready Player One (Paperback)
I bought this book purely because of the title.
When I was a kid there was an arcade machine in the Tea Shop at the local park where I lived. It was one of the early Space Invader cabinets. My best friend and I would go down there with a stack of coins at the weekend just to play the game. When you dropped a coin in the slot at the front, the machine beeped to life and the last words you saw before the action started, in big pixelated capitals were; Ready Player One! That was probably 27 years ago. Anyway Back to the Future.

Oh lordy what do you say about this book?

The Nostalgia is strong in this one.

See what I did there. If your first computer was a ZX Spectrum, you know who Max Headroom was, you own a copy of The Breakfast Club on VHS and you can solve a Rubik's Cube without pulling all the stickers off and rearranging them, then the chances are that you are probably going to love this book.

This is a wonderful book, an unashamed trip into the 80's but set and acted out in a dystopian near future. It tells the story of a no-mark geek and his battle to save the world... well a virtual world called the Oasis anyway. On the way we get treated to a journey into the world of old skool games within the most complete VR game imaginable. Cline cleverly ties this all together along with some stand out scenes in the real world of the story, to create one of the most original and compelling books that I've read in a long time.

A lot of people when asked to summarise this book will say that it's the Matrix meets Willy Wonka, in fact that's the first thing that came to my mind, but that would be to ignore all the elements of the story that make it so immersive and compulsive. It would also be easy to dismiss it as being too overly reliant on the nostalgic element as well, but that would miss the point. The nostalgia is the guilty pleasure. Whilst you could say that it's essentially for geeks who grew up in the late 70's and 80's, it's not exclusively so. The story is strong enough to stand on its own without the reader being aware of all the "wicked" reference's to 80's nerd and pop culture. You don't even need to understand BASIC or Machine Code to 'get it'. It's very compulsive reading and I found myself finishing it all too quickly.
Ready Player One is the definition of a page turner. With some wonderful scenes that are crying out to be transferred to the big screen. When this book is made into a film, and it will be I guarantee you, done right it will absolutely have jaws on floors.

I don't think that I've ever read a book quite like Ready Player One. It's engaging, different, weird, wired and wonderful. There are very few strained elements. Sometime the dialogue is a bit clunky and there are some literary issues. None of this detracts too much because the story will carry you along to somewhere new before you have time to notice any flaws. The most important thing that I can say about Ready Player One is that I read every page with a big silly grin on my face. How often can you say that about a book?

++YOU EARNED 10,000 BONUS POINTS READING THIS REVIEW++
++POWER UP TO NEXT LEVEL++
++ READY PLAYER ONE! ++
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Geeks Rock! -At Least Virtually That Is., 20 Sept. 2011
By 
Tommy Dooley (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Ready Player One (Paperback)
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This has already had so much said about it that I probably have nothing to add. I am not a geek or a fan of computer games, but I did kinda grow up in the eighties and I did like Space Invaders, so I did not think I was the target audience for this book - I could not have been more wrong.

It is set in 2044 where the real world is so poor that most people spend as much of their time possible, just ignoring it. This is done by living in a virtual world on the OASIS. Our hero is Wade Watts, he is still at virtual school on the OASIS living outside of Ohio in a `stack'. A stack is a futuristic trailer park for when we run out of fuel. The trailers are all piled into stacks to save space and the need for travel as no one save the mega rich can afford fuel anymore. Wade lives through his on line avatar `Parcival', he has no real friends and life is just below tolerable with his nasty aunt. She took him in when his mother died ostensibly to steal his food credits.

Then the inventor of the OASIS dies and announces in his will he has left an `Easter Egg' somewhere in the OASIS virtual world; whom so ever finds it first gets to own the multi billion dollar biggest game on the planet. There is also an ISP firm called the IOI, who want to take control and charge for the previously, free access, thus ruining the lives of most users. They own near on everything else, having their own security and prisons or `indenturtements', and are not a nice bunch at all. To get to the `Egg' you wil have to complete a number of tasks and pass through three `Gates'.

Wade then starts to try to find the first gate and the action is on, as IOI and all the other egg hunters or `gunters' are doing the same. Author Ernest Cline writes with love and passion about his favourite time (the Eighties) and his favourite pass time, computer games and all associated paraphernalia including music.

He describes a world that could happen and a virtual world that is probably a logical step from where we are today. There is nothing I don't like about this book, it is going to be made into a film and unless its as good as `Gone With The Wind', it ain't gonna be a patch on this. Even if you are not a computer geek there is something here for you. I found it just totally engrossing and wanted it to carry on for at least another hundred or so pages. Also, as I am not a geek I learnt an awful lot about things I had no idea about however, I was fine with the Monty Python references. I can not recommend highly enough - spoil yourself and read this.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ready Player One - Fantastic story (especially if you love video games), 29 Aug. 2013
By 
Miss AL Holloway (Oswestry) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Ready Player One (Kindle Edition)
This book comes highly recommended by me to gamers, sci fi fans and geeks everywhere.

I feel as though this book was especially written for people of my generation. Growing up in the 80s I am familiar with a lot of the popular culture referenced here. Oh, and I love gaming. If I'm not actually playing a game then reading about someone else playing one is great.

The story is about Wade, his life is pretty sad, but he copes because he has the OASIS - a virtual world which seems like a future generation of MMO with a touch of second life. Everyone uses it, and everyone knows about the Easter egg that the games creator has hidden somewhere in the OASIS. The story is about Wade and his friends hunting for it. But it is so much more than just a quest for the egg. There are numerous references to popular films, music, games and television, mainly from the 80s era, loads of action, and a few clever twists and turns. I think recognising all the references enhanced my enjoyment of the story, but even without that it is still action packed and very enjoyable. I raced to the end because I loved it so much, then regretted it because I wanted to keep reading.

I hope that Ernest Cline writes many more books in this vein, as I enjoyed this one a lot. I'm now on a quest too, to get all my like minded friends to read this book!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tough read but worth it!, 7 April 2015
By 
Hasan Tariq (Birmingham, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Ready Player One (Paperback)
Ernest Cline is best known for writing the original draft of Miramax’s 2009 PR disaster Fanboys, a film about a group of Star Wars super-fans. But with a film deal already in place for his debut novel, Ready Player One, that’s about to change. In a 2044 where resources are incredibly scarce and major cities have spread out into fields of mobile homes and trailers piled atop each other to form skyscrapers known as “the stacks,” Wade Watts escapes his Oklahoma City life and heads into the virtual Internet paradise known as OASIS.

A kind of Second Life mixed with World Of Warcraft and other MMORPGs, OASIS was the crowning achievement of game designer James Halliday, a combination of Will Wright’s innovation and Cliff Bleszinski’s bravado. When Halliday died, he left a video message to the world that somewhere within his vast online universe, he’d hidden three keys that open three hidden gates. The first player to conquer the greatest Easter egg of all time wins control of OASIS, and infinite wealth. But as years go by and nobody can find a shred of viable information on the keys’ locations, publicity dies down.

Luckily for Wade, he’s a devoted scholar of Halliday’s personal history and hobbies, which cover almost every in-fashion ’80s reference imaginable, right down the line of movies, music, television, and videogames. Wade falls into a group of independent questers nicknamed “gunters,” searching for anything related to Halliday’s Easter egg, in opposition to I.O.I., a game corporation bent on winning the contest and monetizing OASIS, threatening the free access to information and joy that the system provides.

Cultural items from VH1’s I Love the 80’s series and early G4 programming like Icons or Portal cover a basic swath of the material, but Monty Python, John Hughes, Dungeons & Dragons, WarGames, Blade Runner, Pac-Man, Rush, and infinitely more highly regarded geek cultural touchstones appear both as delightful inclusions and ingenious plot devices.

Ready Player One lends itself easily to mash-up comparisons, since in its more complicated passages, it amounts to long strings of cultural references pumped through well-worn story arcs. The adventure comedy of Mike Judge’s Idiocracy meets South Park’s Imaginationland with a dash of Willy Wonka, except all of the cynicism has been replaced by sheer geeky love.

Ready Player One borrows liberally from the same Joseph Campbell plot requirements as all the beloved franchises it references, but in such a loving, deferential way that it becomes endearing. There’s a high learning curve to all of the little details Wade throws out about the world, and for anyone who doesn’t understand or love the same sect of pop culture Halliday enjoyed, Ready Player One is a tough read. But for readers in line with Cline’s obsessions, this is a guaranteed pleasure.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic read., 23 Mar. 2014
By 
Paula Mc (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Ready Player One (Kindle Edition)
'Ready Player 0ne' is the story of Wade Watts (or Parzival as he known) whose life is consumed by the OASIS, a world you plug yourself in, which the most of the world's population has. Wade's adventure begins when the OASIS creator, James D Halliday passes away, his legacy? A game that if anyone wins, that person gets the OASIS along with the money and stock that comes with it, for Wade who has spent his life living in a stacker, a tower of mobile homes in a large mobile home park, winning would change everything for Wade. He just has to pass the quests and fight a company that wants the OASIS for its own.

I was pleasantly surprised by 'Reader Player One', I started reading it with some caution because I am in no way a 'gamer', I have only really played 'Street Fighter' and that was on my younger brothers sega mega drive (showing my age). I enjoyed James D Halliday's obsession of the 1980's, the clothes, the music, the TV shows, it made me feel nostalgic, I loved how much I recognised and remembered (although I was slightly confused when it came to American TV shows that had never be shown in the UK but Google helped).

The book also highlights the risks of living in a virtual reality world, Wade for instance does not know how to live in the real world (as does the rest of the world, its very depressing in 2044) and is quite content to hide but as Wade's quest continues he starts to look at the world around him and starts making changes. I liked Wade, he was well written and real, the own downside was his feelings about death but I think that was down to him living as part of the OASIS for most of his life.

Wade was witty, funny, intelligent and you really want him to win the quest.

An interesting, nostalgic story which I will read again.

Highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 4.5 stars - the ultimate gamers' fiction, 9 Mar. 2014
This review is from: Ready Player One (Kindle Edition)
I’ve spent the last hour or so wavering between giving this book 4* or 5*. It’s a difficult one to judge. It’s been a long time since I’ve read any science fiction, but my housemate persuaded me to give this one a go and I’m glad she did.

It follows the story of Wade Watt, a teenage gamer in a world where virtual reality is more real than reality itself. Set in a semi-post-apocalyptic America, real life is pretty grim. The world is in its third decade of recession. Fuel is almost entirely depleted and the majority of the population exists in a state of abject poverty, living in slums known as The Stacks, which are trailer parks of caravans stacked up to thirty high in rusting frameworks.

Almost everyone spends their time hooked up to OASIS, which is a virtual reality world that anyone can access with a visor and a pair of special haptic gloves. It’s started to replace the functions of the real world. Kids attend school there, business is conducted there and the currency is more valuable and stable than any currency in the real world.

When the creator of OASIS dies, he leaves his vast multibillion dollar fortune to whoever can solve a series of riddles, obtaining keys that allow them through “gates” where they have to complete a challenge to obtain the riddle for the location of the next key. It also happens that the creator of OASIS was obsessed with 80′s sub and pop culture.

Into this walks Wade, our (anti)hero. He’s a nerdy, slightly overweight, acne spotted eighteen year old who knows just about everything there is to know about the 80s and is obsessed with finding Halliday’s easter egg, which will give him the creator’s fortune and control over the company that owns and runs OASIS. It’s been five years since Halliday died and when Wade finally figures out the location of the copper key, everyone goes nuts.

Cue a thrilling ride through virtual reality, retro gaming and culture, battles with The Man (IOI – aka the ‘sixers’) and a sweet coming of age and romance story.

It took me a long time to really get into the story, to be honest. I had a weirdly sheltered upbringing – science fiction was a total no-no in our house. I’ve still never seen the original Star Wars movies all the way through, I’ve never been into gaming and even most of the television culture is unknown to me. I didn’t even discover Firefly until a couple of years ago. For that reason alone, most of the references went way over my head. I was also only born in the 80s so much of it meant absolutely nothing to me. That said, the ones I did know and love made me smile whenever I came across them. It also meant that I was a little at a loss to understand the rules of OASIS. I’ve never been any kind of VR gamer or into D&D, so I was lacking some of the framework for how it all worked. I did pick it up the deeper I got into the story and I’m not taking off any star rating because of my own ignorance. I just wish I’d been able to pick up on more of the references.

The other reason it took me a while to get into it is that Cline has created a uniquely rich world. From the grim reality to the awe-inspiring virtual reality of OASIS, he’s given it rich texture, presence and history. The characters are fascinating. That kind of world building requires the reader to have a vast amount of information and the majority of it is imparted in the first several chapters. To give Cline credit, he does it in a graceful enough way to avoid that awkward “info-dump” feeling. It’s all worked into the story, but it’s a lot to wade through to get into the actual shape of the story.

When you do though, you get so absorbed in it that sometimes you forget the characters are in virtual reality. It’s a weird experience but thoroughly enjoyable.

There were so many aspects of this story that I connected with and, sometimes, that was in an uncomfortable way. At one point Wade realises that OASIS has become his life because it’s everything he can never have in the real world. Coming back gets harder and harder every time. I know that feeling so well. When I’m writing, I get absorbed in the worlds I create. Coming back to reality from being someone who has no limits is a crushing, hollow and depressing feeling. It resonated in ways I can’t describe.

There’s a lot of discussion about the nature of online relationships and how people choose to either hide their reality completely or are more real online than they ever could be in person. Again, that was something that connected with me on a base level. I’ve met some of my best friends online. Most of them I’ve met in person, but it’s too easy to forget that there are a lot of people online that aren’t who they claim to be. If you’ve ever been burned by something like that, you’ll know exactly where the character’s emotions are coming from.

The moral aspect of the story is also kind of interesting. Wade and his fellow egg hunters (known as Gunters) spend a lot of time clashing with IOI, a huge multinational corporation that is determined to find the egg first so that they gain control of OASIS and make money from it. With unlimited funds and staff to throw at it, Wade and friends are very much the underdog in a classic David vs Goliath story.

I can’t help but think that the book would make a brilliant film, but the CGI would have to be astonishing to do it any kind of justice and I could imagine that the copyrights would bog a studio down in paperwork for decades to come.

From all my praise, you’re probably wondering why I knocked off half a star. The truth is that I knocked off a whole star for various plot holes. There were a couple of occasions in the book when things just conveniently all came together that didn’t quite ring ‘true’. There were also a couple of occasions, most notably towards the end when Wade sets up his indenture, that everything happens and you suddenly get an explanation of the last three weeks leading up to it. It’s almost like Cline wrote the book in an entirely linear fashion and when he realised something had to happen that he hadn’t plotted for, he just dropped in the backstory there and then, Blue Peter style, to get everyone in the right place.

I then awarded an extra half star for kudos alone. This is a debut novel. A debut novel people, one that is richer and deeper than an awful lot of the scifi that’s out there and being written by established authors. If you love gaming, scifi or the 80s (or any combination of the above) this book will blow you away. Buy it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must-read book for anyone who lived and enjoyed 80's. And love video games, of course, 13 Dec. 2013
This review is from: Ready Player One (Paperback)
"Ready Player One" is the story of dystopian America in a year 2044. Man character Wade Watts is an 18 year old guy living in a trailer park. The world ruled by large corporations, ran out of fossil fuels and majority of people are unemployed, homeless and starved; the only happiness in anyone's life is a virtual free-to-play reality (more world then the game) called the OASIS. The only way to get rid of his miserable life, Wade as million others players is trying to win the OASIS contest, started by OASIS creator, recently deceased. One who wins it will gain his fortune and control over the OASIS.

The book is centered on this contest and Wade's relations with his on-line friends, Aech and Art3mis, who he never encountered in real life. Towards the book end action will move from the virtual to the real world as well.

I wasn't aware of the hype this book created in the "geek" world so it was a real surprise how interesting it was. It brought me back to my youth with its many references (movie, music, video games) to the world of 80's when I was growing up. Also, it brings lot of questions with the parallels drawn to our current world and where we as human race could end up due to the hyper speed of technology development. Whether we are going to live in a world like this in thirty years since today we are spending lot of our time on-line interacting with people we haven't or won't meet in real life?

As already mentioned, the book is homage to the 80's and geek culture as contest itself is revival of those years which are distant past in time when action is taking place. It's obvious that author was fully immersed in everything what was happening those years and this book can be used like a reference to the video games, movies and music back then. But author could be also called a visionary because of some ideas that for sure will soon be possible, like taking part in some favorite movie as one of the characters and go through the movie. That would be a major success, the best virtual reality (game) ever.

The role technology is playing in our life is in fact main question asked by the book. He pictured the future world where people are living almost 24h in virtual reality doing all the activities and only stepping back to real world to perform basic physiological needs, sometimes completely amazed forgetting even that. This is not a beautiful picture, but it is not something which is pure fiction, even these days. If you imagine the OASIS with all its possibilities exists out there for real, I cannot imagine a single person who would not want to spend at least some of their time inside.

While I read it, regardless of I'm a bit older than the main characters, I could see myself doing the same things as these characters, bringing me back to the relaxed 80's when I was a kid and that is why I am thinking this book was great to read.

The only drawback for me was the inclusion of a little unnecessary love story inside plot but looking at the book as a whole it is not that big flaw.

It would not be a spoiler to say that "Ready Player One" is also homage to every single movie we watched in 80's, as kids, where the loser not only proves himself but to rest of the world he is the best/smartest and gets together with the cutest girl at the end. To be fair, there are moments in book where reader can feel the things could go either way but all the time knowing there's only one way book can finish up. And in this case I don't see that as a flaw.

"Ready Player One" by Ernest Cline is must-read book for anyone who lived and enjoyed 80's but also for all younger generations to see what they missed. I am sure that during reading or after it, you will again be reminded on all those movies and video games in which we spent a carefree childhood.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ready Player One by Ernest Cline., 28 Oct. 2013
This review is from: Ready Player One (Paperback)
Ready Player One was a great book about a grim futuristic world where theres mass poverty and the crime rates have sky rocketed, the people escape to a virtual reality called the Oasis. Now the interesting thing about the creator of the Oasis is that he dies and he left in this game world an easter egg, if a player finds it then they win a mass fortune. OASIS money is the most stable currency available. Most people are stuck in schools that are like prisons, and unemployment that is worse.

It's a grim world that Ernest Cline has created in his first novel, Ready Player One, and that's why his protagonist Wade Watts has hacked together some recycled computers so he can escape into the OASIS. But there's an escape hatch even more appealing than gaming. Oasis creator James Halliday has died, and his will stipulates that his massive fortune will go to the gamer who finds three "keys" that unlock an Easter Egg in his virtual world. Nobody can figure out where the first key is, until Wade working alone, figures it out. And that's when things in this fantastic story get really crazy. In Ready Player One, Cline deftly balances his story on the border between two worlds: the harsh reality of Wade's life, where he's a dirt-poor orphan living in a rotting van whose most valuable possession is a connection to the OASIS (his high test scores have earned him a free connection to the planet where his virtual school is located); and the galaxy inside the OASIS, where Wade quickly becomes a gamer superstar after he finds the first egg.

The book was filled with pop culture references, especially from the 80's that if you grew up in that period, then you would easily recognize. The book had some really amazing and humorous moments that made it one of the best and most fascinating books I've ever read. In the front cover it mentions that the book was more like Willy wonka and the matrix, while I wouldn't exactly describe like that, but still it was pretty close (more like the matrix and Brazil). Overall, it was an interesting and great story and a new take on the traditional dystopian novel. As long as you can get past not recognizing some/most of the allusions and video game references (and I did, with ease), you'll enjoy this read. I highly recommend this.
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