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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Engrossing
This is the second of Robert J Sawyer's book that I've read. The style in both makes the books very easy to read. In fact if I were to be churlish, the only criticism I would have is that the style is just a little too simple.
However, I really would be being picky to say that! The story is just brilliant, Sawyer again has that Canadian element in the book, you...
Published on 1 Dec. 1999

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Unbelievable
This was a fairly enjoyable read, but the plot involved 3 incredible things happening to the same couple at once, any of which would have made a good story, but including all of them was just unbelievable.

I won't go into too much detail so as not to give the plot away. But I can mention the fact of Molly's telepathy, as it crops up on page 3 of the novel...
Published on 17 Jan. 2010 by Chris


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Engrossing, 1 Dec. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Frameshift (Voyager) (Paperback)
This is the second of Robert J Sawyer's book that I've read. The style in both makes the books very easy to read. In fact if I were to be churlish, the only criticism I would have is that the style is just a little too simple.
However, I really would be being picky to say that! The story is just brilliant, Sawyer again has that Canadian element in the book, you get the impression that he's dead proud to be Canadian - and wants people to make sure they damn well know he's not from the States! I love the little reference he makes to Californians not saying "you're welcome", but rather "uh-huh". Something that always freaks me out!
The book has inspired me to buy a book on DNA (from Amazon of course!), look up info about war crimes against the Jews on the net (if you were ever unsure about how horrifically the Jews were treated, this leaves you in no doubt) and spend a day and a half solid reading the book.
I'd thoroughly recommend the book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ethical warnings for the near future, 12 Feb. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Frameshift (Voyager) (Paperback)
I thought this was a great story and liked the details about use and abuse of genetic information, something which appears to be happening more and more often these days (Feb 01: a UK insurance company has recently been brought to task about illegal use of experimental genetic screening).
It was pretty difficult to put this book down, and it's clear illustration of a few points about basic genetics were educational :)
Unfortunately amazon's main review of the book gives away some of the plot twists a little too early...
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2.0 out of 5 stars Unbelievable, 17 Jan. 2010
This review is from: Frameshift (Paperback)
This was a fairly enjoyable read, but the plot involved 3 incredible things happening to the same couple at once, any of which would have made a good story, but including all of them was just unbelievable.

I won't go into too much detail so as not to give the plot away. But I can mention the fact of Molly's telepathy, as it crops up on page 3 of the novel. Molly, a major character in the book is telepathic. There is no reason for her to be telepathic, the events of the book don't happen as a result of her being telepathic, nor does her telepathy follow from the events of the book (so it is not a novel about her telepathy). It is just very convenient for the book that she is telepathic. Certainly, if I ever find myself facing a conspiracy of neo-nazi murderers I will hope that my wife is secretly telepathic, and hasn't told me yet.

It is said that good science fiction should contain just one fantastic idea, and the rest deals with the consequences arising from that idea. This novel had two ideas too many.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A fun read but...., 5 Sept. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Frameshift (Voyager) (Paperback)
This book is a fun read but is a little too simple to be more than a page turner.
The story makes a very obvious twist about 3/4 through which makes it a little like a 50s Sci Fi B movie - but has its moments
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gene for telepathy!, 15 Jan. 2006
By 
Stephen A. Haines (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Frameshift (Mass Market Paperback)
There's no doubt that Robert Sawyer can merge the most recent scientific concepts with fictional narrative flawlessly. Frameshift brings the latest revelations in genetic research to a story of murder and conspiracy. To that, he's added a strong historical element, rarely found in speculative fiction. The combination makes an overwhelming tale of perseverance in the quest for justice. This story is astonishingly relevant to today's circumstances.
Sawyer's characters are always excellent images. His Canadians are a wonderfully disparate group [Illegal Alien provides another good example]. Pierre's character is well drawn, although probably the most 'heroic' of all Sawyer's characters. It was surprising that he remains silent on the issue of Quebec independence. That Molly loves Pierre him because he thinks in French, which doesn't intrude on her 'space', was a charming idea.
At first, Molly's telepathic abilities seemed to suggest Sawyer had finally exceeded credibility. Telepathy, mysticism and inspiration from some divinity have too often been brought together to inspire religion with all its hurtful dogmas. That reaction was quelled after reading a fellow Canadian, Sharon Butala. Her non-fiction book, Wild Stone Heart, depicts a perfectly rational person subjected to 'experiences' she can't explain. Why do some people have these 'visions' while others don't? Perhaps, as Sawyer suggests here, there really is a genetic base for telepathy. It's an intriguing notion.
As usual, Sawyer's science is up to the minute. The current attempts to restore extinct species include the quagga, the thylacine [Tasmanian Devil] and even the Neanderthals Sawyer depicts here. He recognizes the need for a proper environment to make the restorations succeed, in this case, Molly herself. If it can happen, this is exactly the mechanism that will be required. He has detailed the process to perfection. This is a highly readable book, stretching the reader's mind just enough to maintain interest and some suspense. [stephen a. haines - Ottawa, Canada]
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