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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worthy sequel and an addictive read.
'The Twelve' is the sequel to 'The Passage' by Justin Cronin. I would suggest you read the books in proper sequence. Justin Cronin provides an epic style introduction at the front of the novel but 'The Passage' is hugely complicated and without having read it I think you might struggle to make much sense of 'The Twelve'.

'The Passage' takes us on a journey...
Published 21 days ago by JK

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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A massive let down
Oh dear. After being absolutely blown away by The Passage, I immediately launched into The Twelve, only to become more and more disillusioned as time went on. By the end I was speed reading, skipping whole sections just to get it over with.

Where The Passage was bleak, and unremitting with peril round every corner and well-rounded characters dropping like flies...
Published 21 months ago by Dave


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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A massive let down, 28 May 2013
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This review is from: The Twelve: The Passage Trilogy Book 2 (Kindle Edition)
Oh dear. After being absolutely blown away by The Passage, I immediately launched into The Twelve, only to become more and more disillusioned as time went on. By the end I was speed reading, skipping whole sections just to get it over with.

Where The Passage was bleak, and unremitting with peril round every corner and well-rounded characters dropping like flies in a gut-wrenching manner, The Twelve is full of convenient escapes, a total lack of threat, characters miraculously surviving impossible situations, returning from the dead etc etc. It turns into a pointless and tedious action adventure, with no suspense as all the main characters by now seem to be completely impervious to any real threat. Where the outside world was a dark and dangerous place before, where the slightest contact meant instant death in all likelihood, now it is essentially a safari. At the end, it really was just a bunch of stuff that happened, with no emotional weight whatsoever.

Its really, truly best just to read The Passage and leave the story there.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worthy sequel and an addictive read., 7 Feb. 2015
By 
JK "J. K." (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Twelve: The Passage Trilogy Book 2 (Kindle Edition)
'The Twelve' is the sequel to 'The Passage' by Justin Cronin. I would suggest you read the books in proper sequence. Justin Cronin provides an epic style introduction at the front of the novel but 'The Passage' is hugely complicated and without having read it I think you might struggle to make much sense of 'The Twelve'.

'The Passage' takes us on a journey through a dystopian earth where mankind is almost extinct due to mutants who need humans as a source of food. The mutants were created as the result of secret experimentation by the military who were blissfully ignorant of the force they were creating.

The focus moves to a particular group of survivors who leave the safety of their compound in the hope of finding a new Utopia. After a prolonged battle and a road trip of many miles just a few of them survive. 'The Twelve' follows their story through several time frames from the past to the present and into a future where a cure for the original virus might be found.

This is a novel that will demand huge amounts of your time and concentration. There have been many changes but the essence of the original characters remains even though they are outwardly changed by time and experience. Amy is the biggest change. Gone is the fragile, spiritual child and possible 'saviour' of the human race!. Amy is strong. Strong enough to carry the demands placed upon her by fate.

I'm not the greatest fan of post-apocalyptic/dystopian fiction but 'The Passage' was undoubtedly one of the best novels I'd read and I have never forgotten it. 'The Twelve' was less convincing but still made for a powerful, addictive read. I'm looking forward to Book 3.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What has happened, 21 Nov. 2012
This review is from: The Twelve (Hardcover)
As with other reviewers I concur, The Passage was one of the best books I have read.
That said upon completetion I could not wait for the follow up. It concluded with a real cliffhanger. I constantly checked the web to see when the follow up was due for release in the UK.
The great day arrived and I purchased The Twelve.
Give it a chance, give it a chance, The Passage started slowly.
I gave it a chance, all 565 pages and was left frustrated and somewhat annoyed at the lack of quality of the follow up.
Good charachters (last stand in Denver) just fade away never to return.
Long, god so long boring passages of descriptions, meaningless pointless dreams that everyone seems to have.

The Passage had an almost tranquil feel about it with the mountain retreat and the Amy/Wolgast chapters.
Suddenly The Twelve presents us we a full on surviving city of some 70,000 !!!
And vehicles 100 years old that still work on tyres that have not perished !!!

The story jumps back and to through time periods you are constantly working out where you are. If I left the book a couple of days I had to check the inside back cover for the list of players and what time zone they belonged to.

The first book was so good I wonder if other things are at play here.
The film rights were sold for a considerable sum on The Passage and The Twelve does seem to have scenes which would lend themselves to spectacular Hollywood special effects. The author himself refers to 'team Cronin'....I wonder.

The book is a massive let down and the final insult is the epilogue with its non sensical rambling paragraphs that made little or no sense to me. The ultimate full stop because I will not be partaking of book 3.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Slow burner, 13 Mar. 2013
By 
anna (KIRKBY STEPHEN, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Twelve (Hardcover)
I loved The Passage from the opening chapter, instantly dragged into the story, loved the characters and looked forward to the next installment. I was, however, a little disappointed with this book, initially. It takes a different route to the one the reader is expecting after the ending in The Passage, and we are instead in time periods already dealt with, focusing on new characters or ones only fleetingly met before, while existing characters have moved on in our absence. But, stick with it. This book requires you to trust the author and keep reading, as it will all start to come together. By the end I was as just as hooked as before and look forward to the final book.
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3.0 out of 5 stars The difficult second novel, 11 Jan. 2015
By 
R. A. Davison (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Twelve: The Passage Trilogy Book 2 (Kindle Edition)
I've had The Twelve on my Kindle for about 3 years without reading it. It's the follow up to dystopia The Passage, a trilogy which is due to conclude this year with City Of Mirrors. I've had several abortive attempts at reading The Twelve, in part because I wasn't grabbed by the opening, and because I was struggling to remember where The Passage left off.

I don't quite know how I missed the section at the start of the book, written in biblical style, summarising events up to this point, but I did. Finding it this time made the book easier to get going with, using Wikipedia really helped too. I guess that's what happens when you leave a three year gap between installments.

Following the end of The Passage our main group of heroes have gone their separate ways, some are missing presumed dead, some are actually dead, and Alicia, for one, has become a creature unto herself neither human nor viral.

After what they learned pursuing Babcock in The Passage, Amy, Peter and co now know that to solve the viral crisis, they must kill The Twelve originators of the plague thereby killing all the virals they individually sired.

Whilst The Passage was an unnerving and bleak novel with a lot of prologue involved, The Twelve is more dramatic set piece after dramatic set piece, action sequences with a clear view to the film adaptation which has been optioned by Ridley Scott. The cage fighting sequence, the convoy ambush, the stadium, the school bus etc. As such it loses much of its reflection upon the changes in the world.

The flashback to just after the virus broke as we meet Bernard Kittridge 'The Last Stand In Denver' is all really great stuff which ends somewhat prematurely. Other things entirely miss the mark. Lila is a terrible character and the hunt for the Twelve becomes ridiculously over simplified were previously it had much potential for a variety of target take down scenarios.

Given that the entire nation has become literally overrun with these things, at one point they are said to number in their millions; it seems odd then, both that human colonies seem to survive in such large numbers or indeed that 100 years later any are left at all.

There were two things I really actually detested about The Twelve. A lengthy segment ensues in which one of the main characters is trapped in The Homeland - an established colony run by a panto villain named Guilder. Instead of inventing conditions in this oppressive colony Cronin merely borrows from the Holocaust. Inmates have barracks and are starving, they have numbers burned into their arms, they have their heads shaved. Instead of feeling like a subtle allegory, the comparison is like a sledgehammer. To do this felt grotesque to the point of offensive to me.

It also has multiple allusions to rape and rape sequences, which I think many readers would find disturbing.

However, I did manage to read this book, in the end, in two large gulps, it does sort of gallop along with haste in a way that makes it occupy your attention, and ultimately these books are quite long over 500 pages each, so having devoted over 1,000 pages of my attention to this saga, it just wouldn't make sense not to read its conclusion.

I have recently said though, that I wish the publishing world would take note of the fact that pandemic dystopias have somewhat reached saturation point now, and act accordingly. I have certainly reached a 'not another one' malais when seeking out new reading materials, and finishing this trilogy will certainly mark my taking a well earned break from them.

7/10
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2.0 out of 5 stars Starts off wonderfully but you will need better patience than myself to finish it..., 17 Jun. 2013
I enjoyed the first of Cronin's set to be trilogy The Passage, not so much that i was on tenter hooks for the sequel The Twelve but it was worth a read. But as i perused new paperback releases i came across a book with a similar look to the cover and realised it was the sequel to The Passage. As any of the fans of the first will know Cronin does a stunning job of grabbing his reader in and thrusting them into this dystopian world he has concocted. He also puts together a great cast of characters that you quickly build an affiliation with, especially in my case Danny the simple bus driver. The narrative never lulls at any point and every detail you get the feeling is intricate to the overall understanding of the story. However the novel is split into books i.e book 1, book 2 and so on, and this is where the problem lies for myself anyway. The narrative spills all over the place, new characters in a totally different time are brought in, main protagonists disappear all together and it just feels like one big tedious mess, that i will admit i didn't finish. I attempted to persevere with it but at over 700 pages long the book is just too much to try and take on when you cant bring yourself to get into it. The first 250 pages though are fantastic and i went through them in a breeze, but was sadly let down by the ending of the particular book which i think is book 3 off the top of my head, and then words fail me for the following dribble that comes after that. I must say though, Cronin is clearly a talented writer, he has just lost his way a little with this one.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Apocalypse Soon, 11 Mar. 2013
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This review is from: The Twelve (Hardcover)
Part two of a trilogy that started with The Passage, a book that was among my favourite discoveries of 2010. Despite that, I entered into The Twelve a little nervous. Why? Because I can barely remember what happened in the last volume.

I read a lot of books. 2010 was a long time ago, in book years.

I needn't have worried. Within a few chapters I had everything I needed to pick up where I left off. As with the previous book, The Twelve covers two main periods of time - the beginning of a genetically engineered vampire outbreak, and the repercussions in a devastated North America a century later. Vampires are all well and good, but as with all apocalypse novels it's the human stories that make or break the tale, and Cronin delivers these with a deft touch in both eras. There's heartbreak to be plucked from the grim trials of humanity in a dying world, and the author handles these deftly and to tremendous effect. The vast time span of the novel is also made good use of here, as it was before, and there is satisfaction to be had in watching the seeds sown in the near future flower abruptly a century later. Finally, Cronin shows that he's more than willing to mess with your expectations in all manner of ways, and the devastating ends of several threads and characters along the way ratchet up the tension and left me eager for the final installment. I'm a sucker for an apocalypse at the best of times, and it's been a while since anybody delivered one as effective as Cronin does here.

To offset all of that, The Twelve shows perhaps a little less invention than The Passage before it, as though all the best tricks have been used up, but there remains a real pleasure in watching this world unfold.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, 16 May 2013
By 
Syriat - See all my reviews
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The Twelve is the middle book of Justin Cronin's post apocalyptic trilogy that details the engineered vampires and America after they take over. Its quite a bit shorter than its predecessor, which in many ways is a relief.

The story follows on after the previous book but not in a linear way. The book flips between events leading up to the fall of America, current events and some events in between. New characters are introduced and new story arcs. The story promises that it will follow the hunting of the twelve, but this is not the case for the majority of the novel. I read the Kindle version of this book and there is a section at the back which gives a list of characters to try and keep track of them. In the traditional format this will work well as you can keep flipping between, not so easy in the Kindle version. Therefore, I found it hard to track the growing cast at times and didn't feel as involved as I did in the first book. However, I read through this in quick time and enjoyed it. Its a cracking read and when the action happens it really does at a pace. Amy is as great a character as ever as well.

This book can't be read alone. Its probably not as good as the first in the trilogy either. But it still is a great read. I am looking forward to the conclusion of the series very much.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not half as good as The Passage, 8 Dec. 2012
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This review is from: The Twelve: The Passage Trilogy Book 2 (Kindle Edition)
I have been waiting to read this book for over a year and constantly scoured the internet for news of its release. As soon as I could I downloaded it to my beloved Kindle and prepared to block out the world for a few days and take myself back to Cronin's apocalyptic world which I had so loved in the first book of this trilogy, The Passage. The first half didn't disappoint and without giving the plot away the whole section about Kittridge 'last stand in Denver' was probably better than anything I have read in the 2 books so far. When Danny was driving that bus just after the virus had been let loose I cheered and cried both at the same time. However, the second half of the book goes off at a complete tangent and now the war is against other human survivors and factions. I found the comparisons with the Nazi death camps and The Homeland quite startling, unnecessary and distasteful. Cronin has lost his way with this book and as has been mentioned in other reviews the endless edition of new characters makes it ever more confusing. In the latter half my heart would sink as a new character was added and I had to work out who they were related to or how they fitted in. To sum up I could have read about Kittridge and co. forever but the rest of the book is just average and the plotline doesn't really follow on from the first book. It is as though Cronin has written another story and just added it in for good measure because he couldn't think of anything else which I find bizarre to say the least. I am giving 3 stars mainly because of the sheer accomplishment of this work and I will go on to read the final part of this trilogy on its release but please Mr Cronin get back to the original theme of The Passage which was oh so much better.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fine continuation, 24 Jun. 2013
I loved the Passage. The Twelve is a worthy sequel, not quite matching its predecessor but coming pretty close.

I remember being frustrated when the author jumped forward in time during The Passage, leaving behind interesting characters I wanted to know more about. Of course, it turned out the new characters taking the main stage where actually even more interesting, so I forgave this transgression quickly! The Twelve satisfyingly takes time to revisit some of those characters I thought had been left behind, as well as move forward the stories of Peter et al. However, it should be noted that Cronin also switches the action to a whole new set of characters once again, this time going backwards chronologically to show us other places just after the virus outbreak. This diversion isn't totally successful - some parts (Last stand in Denver) work well and others work less well but ultimately a lot of the new stories set just after virus outbreak feel like they weren't entirely necessary to move the overall story forward.

However, once we switch back to the more familiar characters, the book picks up pace and the closing chapters are thrilling.

I'm really looking forward to the final book and I'm confident this will be a trilogy where quality is maintained.
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