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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Profoundly useful - a must read
I must admit I had reservations about this book - particularly the personification of the Enneagram (the literary device of 'E' writing the book). Having studied the Enneagram for some time and used it successfully with clients (as a way of helping them to understand better who they are) I didn't really expect to learn all that much that was new. I was dead wrong...
Published on 27 May 2009 by R. A. Gorzynski

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Where from here?
Simon Parke writes a witty and amusing weekly column in the Mail on Saturday magazine about his experience working in a supermarket. Prior to that he was an Anglican priest for twenty years.

The Enneagram is a psychological and spiritual quest to find your identity in one of nine basic character types. Simon Parke, writing as if the Enneagram symbol itself is...
Published on 15 Feb 2009 by Four Violets


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An accessible way to define personality traits, 9 Feb 2011
By 
Hollyhock (South Coast, England) - See all my reviews
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I had not heard of this way of analysing personality traits before I discovered this book, and find it most intriguing and not too abstruse. By reading chapters 1-9 which each deal with a different set of character traits, both positive and negative, I at first thought I was a 2 but now can't decide whether I am more of a 3 or a 4. Whether to think yourself an 8 or 9 makes you a 'better' person that someone who considers themselves a lower number, I am not sure yet but intend to find out.

There are sections on philosophers ranging from Buddha via Jesus, Plato, Socrates to Gurdjieff with many fascinating quotations along the way.

I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in psychology in general, and finding out more about themselves in particular.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Deeply flawed, 8 Oct 2008
By 
M. G. Wilson (Eastbourne) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a deeply flawed book. I can't comment on how well it represents enneagram thinking, or whether as a result I have an accurate opinion. I can say that the author presents no empirical basis for the system, that the more detailed his descriptions of the nine personality types, the less any of them seemed to fit and that had I found a type that fit, the book would have been a poor guide to what to do with that knowledge or how it might be helpful.

And that's without mentioning the author's stilted style and the irritating plot device of writing a book from the perspective of an inanimate object (imagine a book by the talking paperclip).
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3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 11 Oct 2014
it was a present for someone
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gift to be shared, 5 Sep 2008
Simon Parke introduces us to Enneagram (E), sharing Es beginnings, travels, evolution and symbols. E in return shares what E understands of us...for it is the understanding of ourselves that is E's wish, an insight as to the drives that motivate us in life, not that we `know' enneagram. And in the attempt to allow and support us respectively and considerately to re-discover the selves within us that have outwitted childhood to negotiate our way into adulthood, Simon Parke leads us to explore, re-examine and reflect on the way into which we have become accustomed to being in the world. He treats us gently - with infinite love and respect, whilst also encouraging us and guiding us with clarity towards a new path - albeit a challenging path - to not to remain stuck with the strategies for living we developed and clung to as children, but to express ourselves through the essence that has always been ours. It is an amazing gift to find oneself reflected back to oneself so clearly and fully realise that we are not alone. One emerges from this book with hope and new possibilities. It has proved a real gift and one that needs to be shared openly.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 6 Aug 2014
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thank you very much
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars irritating tone of voice, 2 Mar 2010
This book started irritating me from the first pages. The author personifies himself as the Enneagram which is supposedly the world's greatest psychologist. I don't mind over the top metaphors like that (coupled with claims that Jesus, Buddha etc all were somehow Enneagram champions) but I strongly dislike a patronizing tone of voice and the author keeps on saying things like: My dear "Three" (addressing to me and you the readers and potential Enneagram types) "it has been very good to meet you over the past few months and I remain in some awe at being granted the privilege. I thought it showed considerable courage on your part to be willing to meet in this way, and to hold such a mirror to your soul etc etc" This is just a sample, the repetitive identical introduction to each of the characters. If I was in a session with a therapist I might not get so irritated by him/her patting at least once at my back but a book in which the author speaks to me in the "me and you" tone is something at least boring, childish and patronizing. I bought a load of Enneagram books all at once a favorite practice when I want to get introduced to a new topic and I started with this one since it is small and easy to carry along during the day. I dropped it after a few days. Unfortunately only afterward I browsed the bio of the author which says that he was a priest, maybe that explains his tone. Sorry father not for me. Although I don't like comparing products as this might seem as a hidden ad I had quite a fun being introduced to the archetypes by the children-like book "Enneagram made easy" no matter its poor cartoonish drawings and then go deeper with the "Wisdom of the Enneagram".
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