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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Gold Rush (Chaplin Collection) [DVD]
This DVD has the origional silent film with bacground music and also the later version on which a commentary was added. The silent one is better.
Published on 2 Jun 2012 by RobinD

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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Gold Fraud
Beware! Only the inferior 1942 version is included on the blu-ray disc, and the image quality is only so-so. Wait until you get a better offer.
Published on 30 Aug 2010 by Michael


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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Gold Fraud, 30 Aug 2010
Beware! Only the inferior 1942 version is included on the blu-ray disc, and the image quality is only so-so. Wait until you get a better offer.
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32 of 36 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Disappointing Blu Ray., 4 Sep 2010
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Please note that Amazon have decided to put this review on both the Park Circus and the Criterion blu-ray pages. The review I posted below concerns the Park Circus blu-ray only, and I neither intended nor expected it to crop up on the Criterion blu-ray page.

Park Circus seem to have got things the wrong way round here. The 1925 original (restored by Kevin Brownlow) is the version that people want to see on Blu Ray, not the 1942 version with Chaplin's commentary. The DVD contains everything, including all the extras and Brownlow's restoration of the 1925 original, whilst the Blu Ray only contains the 1942 version of The Gold Rush. All in all this release is not what it appears to be ... disappointing and deliberately misleading. Caveat emptor.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Gold Rush (Chaplin Collection) [DVD], 2 Jun 2012
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RobinD "Dicky Bird" (Southampton, England) - See all my reviews
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This DVD has the origional silent film with bacground music and also the later version on which a commentary was added. The silent one is better.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Comparison, 5 Feb 2011
Enjoyed seeing Chaplin's 1942 reworking of the original 1925 film alongside the original silent film. Whilst the 1925 version is far superior (why did Chaplin recut with the voiceover) it's good to see the two side by side.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chaplin's Second (and greatest) Feature (the 1925 original), 30 Nov 2013
The Criterion Collection's remastered The Gold Rush (1925) is undoubtedly the Charlie Chaplin release of 2012. For years, the prevailing critical consensus was that Gold Rush was Chaplin's feature film masterpiece. However, a newer generation of critics have since argued that honor should go instead to City Lights (1931). The Gold Rush receives criticism for its episodic structure; however, all of Chaplin's features, including City Lights, are episodic to a degree. This is not necessarily a bad thing, making that a moot critique.

The Criterion Collection release features the 1925 original, along with the 1942 re-edit that omitted the intertitles in favor of narration (by Chaplin) and economically trimmed down of some excess plot developments. While the 1942 version does look better and the editing is better paced, Chaplin's voice-over actually dates the film far worse than the silent original.

Chaplin had a voice which carried well into the sound era. He intuitively knew that silent film was a different art form, however. Thinking about marketing, he seemed to have forgotten that fact. The 1942 version illustrates the artist's discomfort with sound. Chaplin never could wrap his art around the new sound medium, and he pointlessly tells us what we are already seeing. Some may prefer the 1942 version, but my concentration will be on the superior, original version that audiences of 1925 saw.

While The Gold Rush exhibits Chaplin's characteristic pathos, here it is far better balanced with his brand of comedy than any of his other features (when the pathos, often, nearly soaked the films).

Chaplin's increasing need for audience sympathy marred may of his later features. Here, he keeps that need in check, and all for the better. Chaplin's Mutual shorts are considered by many (including Chaplin) to be his best work. One of the reasons for that is the presence of his best nemesis in Eric Campbell. But, when Campbell was killed in an automobile accident in 1917, Chaplin was left without a great heavy. His first feature film, The Kid (1921) was able to bypass that. For this, Chaplin's second Tramp feature, two villains were needed: the bonafide villain Black Larson (Tom Murray) and reformed villain Big Jim McCay (Mack Swain). While neither Swain nor Murray could replace Campbell, they were aptly cast and give the film needed tension.

The Gold Rush`s most discussed scene is the dance of the dinner rolls, often imitated (and usually badly--Chaplin was a master at utilizing props for something other than their intended use). What may be the most compelling scene, however, is the surreal chicken hallucination. Everyone has seen this scene spoofed in countless Looney Tune shorts. The starving villain (Swain) imagines his buddy (Chaplin) to be a walking meal (in this case, a plump chicken). Chaplin's shoe-eating scene (complete with shoe laces substituting for noodles) and the rocking house at the edge of the cliff are additional surreal vignettes.

While Chaplin was never a Surrealist, many of his films contained surreal vignettes. The Kid had the dream of heaven, Sunnyside (1919) has the Tramp frolicking in a ballet with hill nymphs. Perhaps it was Chaplin's occasional, natural elements of Surrealism which endeared him to the movements luminaries, such as André Breton. Next to Harry Langdon and Buster Keaton, Chaplin was the filmmaker most cited by the Surrealists.

As The Gold Rush progresses, hunger, the struggle for survival, and harsh elements give way to a soapy romance with the dance hall girl Georgia (Georgia Hale). Chaplin had originally cast 15 year-old Lita Grey in the role, but his getting her pregnant necessitated a new lead actress. While Chaplin does milk sympathy as a rejected lover, he never does it (here) at the expense of the film's comedic tone.

As to be expected, the Criterion extras are abundant: both film versions, a 15 minute short (Presenting The Gold Rush), audio commentary, booklet, a look at Chaplin the composer, and James Agee's famous 1942 review of the film.

*my review originally appeared at 366 weird movies
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5.0 out of 5 stars silent comedy, 11 May 2014
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charlie chaplin in top form in this classic silent comedy. i would recommend this film to children of all ages.
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5.0 out of 5 stars If you want a laugh, 6 Mar 2014
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This film takes me back to my childhood. I can remember the first time I watched this film the cinema and everything about it. I find it really funny, let face it we don't have much to laugh about currently.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece, 5 Aug 2013
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I've bought all of Charlie Chaplin films recently because I always liked him. Of all the Gold Rush is definitely the best that he made together with the Kid.
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5.0 out of 5 stars for my collection, 20 May 2013
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I love this film, took it with me on holidays to share with family and we all enjoyed it again and again.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Beware - it's NOT the Carl Davis soundtrack, 30 Nov 2010
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Although the 1925 silent version is included and is stated to be the Kevin Brownlow restoration, I found to my disappointment, it is NOT the Photoplay presentation. It DOES NOT have Carl Davis's orchestral version of the soundtrack! It is accomplanied only by a piano. The film is excellent but if you are buying it for the Carl Davis aspect, as I did, don't bother!
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