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36 of 38 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sinister, sensual intelligent thriller
There are some films where it's almost impossible to go into detail without spoiling your enjoyment of the movie. `Woman in the Fifth' is one of those. It's an intricate, intelligent, fragmented thriller which plays with notions of reality and the boundary between imagination and actuality. Normally I'd try to tell you more about it... but I'm on thin ice here...
Published on 19 April 2012 by Rowena Hoseason

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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars New Take on Vertigo
The opening scenes promise a moving and intriguing drama as we are introduced to the confused and dysfunctional world of Tom, an American lecturer and writer, estranged from his French wife and barred from seeing his small daughter. He gradually falls under the spell of Margit, a mysterious older woman, played by Kristin Scott Thomas, "the woman in the fifth" by virtue...
Published on 31 Mar 2012 by Antenna


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36 of 38 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sinister, sensual intelligent thriller, 19 April 2012
By 
Rowena Hoseason "Hooligween" (Kernow, Great Britain) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Woman in the Fifth [DVD] (DVD)
There are some films where it's almost impossible to go into detail without spoiling your enjoyment of the movie. `Woman in the Fifth' is one of those. It's an intricate, intelligent, fragmented thriller which plays with notions of reality and the boundary between imagination and actuality. Normally I'd try to tell you more about it... but I'm on thin ice here!

The film-making is exquisite. This is a modern day tale but it feels like (and references) Orwell's Paris of the 1930s, and the erratic protagonist is most definitely down and out. A troubled American writer who initially appears to be a on quest to reunite with his estranged French family, he stumbles chaotically through a washed-out, sparsely uninhabited urban landscape and seeks solace in the fictional forest he created for his first (and only) published novel.
Ethan Hawke establishes an entirely convincing character who seems caught in the roiling currents of circumstance. Rebuffed and bewildered, he drifts into territory which is both threatening and seductive. Desperate for a reunion with his beloved young daughter, he ends up in sordid situations which take a surreal turn into murder and mayhem. Finally his daughter's life is threatened and he must face up to the malign influence which has almost unravelled his existence. The ending is... ambiguous, but earlier scenes provide some important cues about what might be happening.
The supporting cast is wonderful; not just Kristen Scott-Thomas as the woman herself, but also the Polish waitress who befriends him, and the charmingly sinister Sezer who provides the writer with accommodation and employment - but at what cost? The bilingual script, swapping fluidly back and forth between French and English is entertaining, too (especially as many of the subtitles don't quite convey the same meaning as the speech...)
The overall result is a taut thriller - not an action-based adventure in the slightest, but one where all the important stuff is going on internally. We were gripped by its pace and characters, delighted by the visuals, and kept intellectually engaged by the undercurrents of the plot. We'll be watching it again to soak up more of the atmosphere, and to see if our suspicions about some of the themes are correct.

One item to note: the blurb seems to suggest that this is strongly sexual or erotic. Apart from one memorable scene (where the camera shows only faces), it's all pretty mild.
8/10
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars New Take on Vertigo, 31 Mar 2012
By 
Antenna (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Woman in the Fifth [DVD] (DVD)
The opening scenes promise a moving and intriguing drama as we are introduced to the confused and dysfunctional world of Tom, an American lecturer and writer, estranged from his French wife and barred from seeing his small daughter. He gradually falls under the spell of Margit, a mysterious older woman, played by Kristin Scott Thomas, "the woman in the fifth" by virtue of her address, and possibly something else as well. In the background we see the initially plain, childlike Polish waitress who who may bring Tom a truer peace than Margit,

Proceeding at a slow pace, with lingering shots of distinctive faces, a balcony with a blurred suggestion of the Eiffel Tower in the background, red insects on dark tree bark, threadlike spiders spinning webs in a police cell, this film weaves a sense of tension, even menace, and begins to insert surreal moments between scenes of clear rationality.

When it ended quite abruptly after little over 80 minutes, I was left feeling cheated, trying to work out exactly what had happened, wondering what clues I had missed, but not doing so too hard since it seemed that the director had resorted to the realms of the supernatural, or madness, to provide a denouement. This reminded me afterwards of Hitchcock's "Vertigo", recrafted for the present day.

The film is based loosely on a novel which seems to have prompted mixed reviews and perplexed readers in a similar fashion.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Condensed and at times esoteric...", 15 Aug 2012
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This review is from: The Woman in the Fifth [DVD] (DVD)
Polish-born screenwriter and director Pawel Pawlikowski`s fourth feature film which he wrote, is an adaptation of a novel from 2007 by American writer Douglas Kennedy. It was screened in the Special Presentations section at the 36th Toronto International Film Festival in 2011 and is a France-Poland-UK co-production which was shot on locations in Paris, France and produced by producers Caroline Banjo and Carole Scotta. It tells the story about Tom Ricks, an American university professor and writer who goes to Paris, France where his ex-wife Nathalie and their adolescent daughter Chloe lives. He gets himself a room at a place run by a man named Mr. Sezer and tries to get in touch with his daughter, but due to a restraining order he has to find ways to see his daugher without being noticed by Nathalie. While searching for opportunities to rekindle with Chloe, Tom befriends a Polish woman and at a literary gathering he meets a woman named Margit who intrigues him.

Precisley and finely directed by Polish filmmaker Pawel Pawlikowski, this finely paced fictional tale which is narrated from the protagonist`s point of view, draws a moving portrayal of a struggling writer`s relationship with his young daughter, a friendly waitress and a mysterious widow. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions, fine production design by production designer Benoit Barouch, cinematography by Polish cinematographer Ryszard Leczewski, editing by film editor David Charap and use of colors which empashizes it`s poignant atmosphere, this character-driven psychological thriller depicts an intriguing an internal study of character and contains a good score by British composer Max De Wardener.

This somewhat surreal, somewhat romantic, literary and enigmatic neo-noir where the story is going on as much inside the main character`s mind as in the city of Paris, is impelled and reinforced by its subtle character development, interrelating stories, cogent narrative structure, the understated and refined acting performances by American actor, writer and director Ethan Hawke, English actress Kristin Scott Thomas and the notable acting perfomance by Julie Papillon, as the protagonist`s daughter, in her debut feature film role. A condensed and at times esoteric mystery.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars atmospheric but not really satisfying, 10 July 2013
By 
schumann_bg - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Woman in the Fifth [DVD] (DVD)
I watched this straight after Polisse and I must say its more measured tone seemed initially rather flat; however there are quite a lot of striking images in this film and it is, at the very least, cinematic. Ethan Hawke is an excellent actor, almost unrecognisable from the newly released Before Midnight, and even his voice is completely different (it's also a role he plays largely in French). However the film is only mildly diverting, I would say; not much happens for much of the time, beyond the establishment of a highly strange set of circumstances in contemporary Paris, involving a not-quite-there American writer, his estranged wife and child, a slightly sinister boarding house he stays in, a Polish girl who works there, and a wealthy woman who lives in the 5th arrondissement (Kristin Scott Thomas). It's mainly about atmosphere, and it's not at all clear where it's going; then in the last 20 minutes things start to move fast - whether it really works is open to question, I would say, and it is presumably meant to remain somewhat shrouded in mystery anyway. It reminded me of a film called The Music of Chance from the early 90s with James Spader and Mandy Patinkin, but actually that was a better film with more shafts of humour and a deeper feeling. It also explores a similar area of meaning to Ozon's recent In the House, also with Scott Thomas, but again, Ozon's film has more wit and compels you more. For all its awareness of images I don't think The Woman In The Fifth is all that interesting to watch or a very good vehicle for the actors.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I EXIST AS MUCH AS YOU EXIST, 16 May 2013
By 
The Movie Guy "Movies from A to Z" (United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Woman in the Fifth [DVD] (DVD)
Tom Ricks (Ethan Hawke) is an American novelist who goes to Paris in hopes of patching up his relationship with his ex-wife (Delphine Chuillot) and daughter (Julie Papillon). She wants nothing to do with him because of some event in their past, which is not fully explained. Through a series of bad luck he ends up working for a man named Sezer (Samir Guesmi) as a night time doorman, a job steeped with symbolism as he works on his second novel.

Meanwhile, Tom meets a mysterious older woman (Kristin Scott Thomas) who has taken a shine to him. She is the "Woman in the Fifth." He begins an affair with her about the same time he takes up with Sezer's girlfriend, his "Polish muse" (Joanna Kulig). We don't know how weird things really are until near the end of the tale.

If I told you I understood everything in this film, I would be lying. There is symbolism in his forest writing, the bugs, and the light which dims and goes bright, none of which I fully understood. Then there is the weird aspect of the movie which turns this into an existential film, something I didn't fully comprehend. I didn't think it was worth watching a second time through in an attempt to make heads or tails out of the film.

This is an artsy film. It is in part in English and French with subtitles, and Polish with no subtitles. The action moves slow as it concentrates on the character of Tom Ricks. I am looking for a good plot spoiler review to tell me what I just watched.

Parental Guide: F-bomb (in French, spelled correctly for us in English), sex, no nudity.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sinister, sensual and intelligent thriller, 1 April 2013
By 
Rowena Hoseason "Hooligween" (Kernow, Great Britain) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Woman in the Fifth [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
There are some films where it's almost impossible to go into detail without spoiling your enjoyment of the movie. 'Woman in the Fifth' is one of those. It's an intricate, intelligent, fragmented thriller which plays with notions of reality and the boundary between imagination and actuality. Normally I'd try to tell you more about it... but I'm on thin ice here!

The film-making is exquisite. This is a modern day tale but it feels like (and references) Orwell's Paris of the 1930s, and the erratic protagonist is most definitely down and out. A troubled American writer who initially appears to be a on quest to reunite with his estranged French family, he stumbles chaotically through a washed-out, sparsely uninhabited urban landscape and seeks solace in the fictional forest he created for his first (and only) published novel.
Ethan Hawke establishes an entirely convincing character who seems caught in the roiling currents of circumstance. Rebuffed and bewildered, he drifts into territory which is both threatening and seductive. Desperate for a reunion with his beloved young daughter, he ends up in sordid situations which take a surreal turn into murder and mayhem. Finally his daughter's life is threatened and he must face up to the malign influence which has almost unravelled his existence. The ending is... ambiguous, but earlier scenes provide some important cues about what might be happening.
The supporting cast is wonderful; not just Kristen Scott-Thomas as the woman herself, but also the Polish waitress who befriends him, and the charmingly sinister Sezer who provides the writer with accommodation and employment - but at what cost? The bilingual script, swapping fluidly back and forth between French and English is entertaining, too (especially as many of the subtitles don't quite convey the same meaning as the speech...)
The overall result is a taut thriller - not an action-based adventure in the slightest, but one where all the important stuff is going on internally. We were gripped by its pace and characters, delighted by the visuals, and kept intellectually engaged by the undercurrents of the plot. We'll be watching it again to soak up more of the atmosphere, and to see if our suspicions about some of the themes are correct.

One item to note: the blurb seems to suggest that this is strongly sexual or erotic. Apart from one memorable scene (where the camera shows only faces), it's all pretty mild.
8/10
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Far to clever for it's own good, 29 Oct 2012
By 
Mr. T. Solley - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: The Woman in the Fifth [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
CONTAINS SPOILERS

I really tried to like this film by watching it to the end.

It's one of those films that at the end you feel cheated.

What was in the room?
Why was the main character ill and what stopped Him seeing His Daughter?
How did the Mistress disappear when the Police come and why was She using a false ID?

I could go on, but no matter how good a film is, if it leaves you with more questions then answers, then for me, it ultimately fails...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Atmospheric thriller but don't expect it to make any sense......, 11 Aug 2012
By 
H. Robertson (GLOS. U.K.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Woman in the Fifth [DVD] (DVD)
I enjoyed most of the film as it was atmospheric and showed the darker side of Paris life and the acting was good however the supernatural twist was weak (as others have suggested in reviews of the book). I think the plot was fine up until the end - that depended on believing that the main character, played by Ethan Hawke, was in an unstable mental state and had been hallucinating - but there the film did not succeed.I was left wondering if I had missed some clues earlier in the story as things were not explained and there was no final resolution.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good film!, 21 Jun 2012
By 
Mrs. P. A. Jones "annabout" (North Wales, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Woman in the Fifth [DVD] (DVD)
I really enjoyed this film but so glad I had read the book before watching it. I shall now read the book again.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 9 July 2014
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This review is from: The Woman in the Fifth [DVD] (DVD)
Highly Entertaining.
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The Woman in the Fifth [Blu-ray]
The Woman in the Fifth [Blu-ray] by Pawel Pawlikowski (Blu-ray - 2012)
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