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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A master class in fiction writing.
Usually a reader of more mainstream mass marketed adventure novels which have some links to historical fact: think Brown, Gibbins et al - I was delighted to discover this absolute gem of a novel. Intrigued by the setting and double narrative, I purchased the book and wasn't disappointed.

I must start by expressing one important truth: Davies' writing is...
Published on 12 April 2010 by Optimistic Blue

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Could have been better
I did enjoy the book, the setting was effective, the basic plot was interesting and on the whole I thought it was quite well written. The main reason I've only given it 3 stars is that the parts that were set in the present time were unconvincing and seemed in an odd way unconnected with the story as it unfolded in the past.
Published 21 months ago by fredsaid


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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A master class in fiction writing., 12 April 2010
This review is from: Into Suez (Hardcover)
Usually a reader of more mainstream mass marketed adventure novels which have some links to historical fact: think Brown, Gibbins et al - I was delighted to discover this absolute gem of a novel. Intrigued by the setting and double narrative, I purchased the book and wasn't disappointed.

I must start by expressing one important truth: Davies' writing is flawless - quite simply in a different league to any of my usual reads. This was a refreshing experience - every word had it's place, the narrative flowed freely, painting beautiful pictures of Egypt, stirring every conceivable emotion from the depths, the plot gripping and not relenting until the last word. And the book did not finish when I put it down, I was left wracked with emotion, my senses assaulted, a feeling that stayed with me for days afterwards. Such is the quality of the characterisation that every delicious and sometimes painful plot twist and change in relationship really mattered - I have never cared about, empathised and sympathised with or understood characters so much as I did with 'Into Suez's' Ailsa and Joe. I have read a few novels with double narratives and always cared more for one time frame than the other. I have been guilty of skimming through chapters just to get back to the favoured narrative - I am delighted to say this is NOT the case here! Both narratives are of equal value and are integral to the book; they exist to enhance each other. We explore Egypt during the run up to the Suez Crises of the 1950's through the eyes of a newly married and adventurous Ailsa and her young and equally spirited and tender daughter Nia... During the early 2000's we experience a grown up Nia's quest to retrace her roots and uncover her families devastating truths; all the while mother and daughter are caught up in the hypnotic spell of the charismatic Mona Seraphim Jacobs.

Perhaps Davies' biggest achievement in writing this book is her ability to challenge your sense of stereotypes: Ailsa is no ordinary housewife - she will not be caged by her military house doing chores, will not be intimidated by the instability or conflict, will not agree with racism at any level and cannot help but feel that the British presence in Egypt is not justified. She longs to discover the 'real' Egypt, understand it's people, ride motorbikes and mingle with individuals she really ought not to. Joe has much deeper, warmer layers than his regimented military exterior, experiences in conflict and casual racism (sadly endemic at the time) exude. His relationship with his daughter is beautifully portrayed, his compassion and affection made very clear; his love of his wife is absolute and the extent to which he values his best friend is staggering. At the heart of this wonderful book is the fact that we human beings can't help craving something more... we take things for granted when we quite possibly have all we could wish for, we don't always learn from our mistakes, we justify taking risks to ourselves, throwing so much into jeopardy, even when we hear that warning bell ringing! The novel expertly explores the consequences of Ailsa and Joe's choices in Egypt and the devastating reality of the resulting aftermath. I cannot recommend this book enough - a 'must read' doesn't do it justice. I'm off to read a couple of Davies' previous novels: 'The Eyrie' and 'The Element of Water'. If they are half as good as 'Into Suez' then I am in for a treat! Thank you Stevie Davies for writing this powerful, challenging and wonderfully bittersweet book, I am stunned by it's brilliance.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars History Transmuted, 7 April 2010
By 
A Howdle (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Into Suez (Hardcover)
Into Suez
"Into Suez" is a novel that balances panorama and intimacy. The greatest achievement of this novel is how it to combines the historical Suez crisis with the private history of its characters, such that the larger picture and the smaller picture exist seamlessly together. The novel narrates the life of Ailsa, a strong-minded woman, and how her life in Egypt enlarges her experiences of life. A double narrative runs throughout: Ailsa's Egypt, much of it experienced through her daughter Nia, and Nia's return to Egypt to meet Mona Serafin, a mystical, creative artist who shared an intense and deep relationship with Ailsa. Often, double narratives can be contrived. "Into Suez", however, is structured with technical skill and the result is a breathtaking, natural narrative. Throughout the works of Stevie Davies there is fascination with the daughter-mother bond, the myth of Persephone-Demeter, and how this challenges a modern, patriarchal world that values Hades: violence, war and the rape of civilisations rather than human love and rapture. The prose style of "Into Suez" is lyrical and hard-hitting. And just as Mona Serafin, is a pianist of great intelligence, so the author of this novel is a writer capable of complex key changes and tonalities. "Into Suez" is meticulously researched: historical fact is transmuted into a novel that channels, like the Suez canal, a complex world of human feelings. This novel changes the reader, as a great novel should.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Riveting Read!, 14 April 2010
By 
J. L. Williams "bookworm" (south-east England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Into Suez (Hardcover)
Stevie Davies always writes quality fiction of substance and in my view she has excelled herself with Into Suez. This is a fast-moving and cracking good yarn, into which have been deftly weaved a number of interesting socio-political themes that held me rapt from start to finish. I couldn't put it down, for it is both daring and moving. Not for the lily-livered, but if you enjoy fiction that you can really get your teeth into try this one.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read, 4 Aug 2011
This review is from: Into Suez (Hardcover)
I have no hesitation in awarding Into Suez by Stevie Davies 5 stars. Without any doubt,it's the best book I've read in 2012. The Suez Crisis was something that I knew very little about and the novel is extremely informative on the politics of the time.However, her research never gets in the way of this page turner and she is able to hold the reader's attention throughout. There are many well drawn characters in the book and because they are often very complex, you are never sure how they will react under pressure. It's a real emotional roller coaster and many of the scenes are disturbing and not for the faint hearted. The relationship between Ailsa and Joe is far from straightforward and yet, I never doubted their love for one another. Stevie Davies is an excellent writer and some of her descriptions of Egypt are truly beautiful. Book groups would find plenty to discuss - the historical background of Suez and the Arab/Israeli conflict, racism, the role of women in post-war society and class distinctions within army life. I loved it!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 14 April 2010
By 
M. Kahn "MW Kahn" (Wales) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Into Suez (Hardcover)
"Into Suez" was written by a masterful hand--one capable of balancing brutal honesty with the most delicate insight into human emotion. This book has a raw power to it, a visceral realism. The experience of reading this book was so intense that I found myself several times almost wanting to put the book down, to look away--and yet every time I couldn't--I was compelled to keep going because I felt such sympathy with the characters. Ailsa, Nia, Joe, and Mona are vivid, complicated, living out their parts of a story much larger than any of them. It is a romance, a history, a mystery. Davies finds a way in to the vast complexities of colonialism, war, and prejudice without ever for a moment letting us forget that here are real people who love and grieve.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Could have been better, 24 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Into Suez (Kindle Edition)
I did enjoy the book, the setting was effective, the basic plot was interesting and on the whole I thought it was quite well written. The main reason I've only given it 3 stars is that the parts that were set in the present time were unconvincing and seemed in an odd way unconnected with the story as it unfolded in the past.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars marvellous exploration of evils of empire, 2 July 2010
This review is from: Into Suez (Hardcover)
Am extremely impressed by this evocation of the horrors, both stark and subtle, of
empire - not just the British empire but any empire anywhere. This
book makes it so clear that racism, condescension and carelessness at best,
ruthless cruelty at worst, are the inevitable results of one nation ruling another. Into Suez held me gripped throughout. So much in it is so good: the living, breathing Roberts family; Joe's sweet
innocence and malign ignorance, two sides of the same coin; Mona's compelling
and eventually irritating charisma, her generous impulses and egocentric
irresponsibility, both also all one at root: the roundedness of all the
characters. Even Irene, who could so easily have been a cipher, really lives and
breathes. Most wonderful of all, as a character, I thought, was child Nia. I was
bowled over by the brilliance of the creation of her seven or eight year old's
insights and perceptions and urges and feelings, every one totally spot on.
A wonderful read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very good, 14 May 2013
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This review is from: Into Suez (Kindle Edition)
Suez, a little like the Korean War, has failed to spawn the same plethora of novels as most other wars. I therefore knew little about it, but this book seemed very well-researched (especially given that there remains so much classified information on the subject), and at the same time very accessible. Nice one, and renewed my interest in the period generally.
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5.0 out of 5 stars beautifully written and evocative, 22 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Into Suez (Kindle Edition)
Stevie Davies has woven a delightful web here: the evocation of 1950s Egypt is haunting, the storyline original and absorbing, and best of all the characters are complex yet convincing. Joe in particular is a fascinating character, his military respect for hierarchy set against his tenderness with his daughter and his ignorant racist projudices contrasting with a sensitivity which leads to his being reduced to tears by the voice of Oum Kalthoum... many facets making a memorable whole. The relationships between Ailsa and her husband, Mona and finally Irene are finely sketched. I was less interested in the modern part of the story, but this did provide a frame from which to view the big story. And all in a highly readable, polished style. I must read more by this author!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good period piece, 18 Jan 2013
By 
D. M. Pearce (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Into Suez (Kindle Edition)
A well crafted story that picks up the attitudes of the period. I found the sudden switches of era, jumping a generation without warning, confusing at times.
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