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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An individual voice speaking out with some useful practical suggestions, and the challenge to think and learn for yourself.
Traditional Witchdraft for urban Living.
Melusine Draco

My first impressions of this book when it arrived were good: inviting image on the cover, clear print, and most noticably pleasantly soft to the touch. That may seem an odd place to start but it was what first grabbed me. Not only do the pages not try to slice your fingers but it gently lies open at...
Published on 23 Feb 2012 by Ashbeth

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A little judgemental but otherwise very informative
alot of info and written in a friendly matter. lots of tid bits of facts and info along with being jam packed of good ideas and help. at random times the author seems a little angry and judgmental of some people's practices and you feel as if you're being told off! but all in all a really good book I will dip into again and again
Published 1 month ago by mel


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An individual voice speaking out with some useful practical suggestions, and the challenge to think and learn for yourself., 23 Feb 2012
Traditional Witchdraft for urban Living.
Melusine Draco

My first impressions of this book when it arrived were good: inviting image on the cover, clear print, and most noticably pleasantly soft to the touch. That may seem an odd place to start but it was what first grabbed me. Not only do the pages not try to slice your fingers but it gently lies open at the page you ask it too which results in a more relaxed reading experience all round. No bracing against pages trying to close and loose your place.

The book itself is written in a very individual voice. It is, as the title suggests, a treatise on and an introduction to
practicing traditional witchcraft with the limitations of our towns and cities. It achieves this competently and characterfully
and much of it is very clearly drawn on the authors personal experience. It is not a training course and it is not an encyclopedia. Neither is it a clear and simple guide book or an instructional to lead you through every step.
Certainly there is information in here on festivals and of correspondences; a list of many types of
divination and their names; and a run down of the major arcana of tarot; but it does not attempt to cover
any of them in great depth. Throughout the information sections are mostly just sharing as much as is needed
to keep everyone up to speed on the discussion and teachings as they continue.

It is broken into chapters by different areas, but they still have the feel of flowing one to another as a continuing conversation. The mention of a subject in one chapter doesn't limit it to that spot, things naturally overflow a little and reflect back to earlier points as one does in conversation. This makes it readable as an extended essay and it takes you with it through the trains of thought, something carefully categorised reference texts can tend to lack. It is by no means a sterilised catalogue of witchcraft.

The first chapter encourages connection with the elements - where so ever we find them.
Similarly the second and third look at countryside and creatures, with the admirable encouragement
to work with what you know; to increase what you know and the great wisdom inherent in focussing on those whom might actually share your environment rather than just creatures of your hopes, dreams and fantasies.

The author then moves to areas many may think of as more typical of witchcraft and it's urban challenges - the psychic environment and pollution faced by those towns and cities. Next to observance of festivals, including practical considerations designed to avoid arkward explanations to officials and concerned neighbours, cautionary tales to make you think twice. Here again there is some useful basic information, more importantly we hear an interesting voice challenging us to think for ourselves and craft something appropriate from our Craft, especially when faced with challenges such as rooms in modern hutches being smaller than a typical traditional circle is considered to be.
We are then onto chapters of seeing and being: that is scrying or divination and green sacred spaces
which are addressed again with seed information, clearly designed not to bottle feed the audience pap but to encourage the interested reader to search for more information elsewhere. Throughout the book suggestions of starting points for those very elsewheres are offered in the form of occasional ideas for further reading and the back of the book has a reasonable list which will also help.

The next chapter has a mixed character, and is hard to summarise. Amongst other areas it looks at religion and talks about personal characteristics as well as ethics and our relationship with sacred spaces. Interestingly it suggests how different religions overlay their own glaze on sacred places and how to see through that. Finally the book is rounded off with a responsible pointer to some of the changes to be expected from such development and how they are exacerbated in the urban environment.

I personally differ from the author in that i feel that even if we cannot make ourselves anywhere near perfect and although knowing ourself properly is nigh on impossible, it is still a worthwhile pursuit. By attempting and achieving a part, if never the whole, then we stimulate our own growth and can at least address any major imbalances, or at least recognise them. Certainly the mirror is watery and easily disturbed and distorted, but we will still learn more by looking into it than we do by ignoring it. In proportion and balance that self knowledge is an important grounding which equips us to grow forward on healthy stable foundations. Skipping a stage because it is hard to do is seldom the best option in any path of learning, and since spiritual and magical development will often exagerate characteristics, personal damage and idiosyncracies I would have thought encouraging learning, about oneself (as well as ones environment) as a foundation gives the student the best chance of a healthy survival in society in general. However, each to their own, self knowledge is not criticised, simply excused from the syllabus as an intentional subject and left to be an inevitable unplanned learning.

On the whole the very individual voice is rather refreshing and personalises the whole piece in a very honest way, even in areas of differences.

In a world where many books are layed out in idiot proof bullet lists with clear sharp tables or logical sub-headings declaring the absolute laws of a subject, it does seem more appropriate that this very personal subject should be addressed in this distinctly personal way.

For me the only real weak points in the whole book were a couple of small and specific points when it occasionally got a little too personal and anecdotal and assumed that the authors attitude would be shared by the reader.
But then it is a personal account and at no point does it pretend to be anything but and realistically over 20 years experience of traditional witchcraft (especially if much of it is in the sometimes oppressive environment of the city centre) might understandably leave you with some strong views on some areas.

There is a slight risk that the rural or even suburban witch reading this might sometimes feel that she has somehow caused offense with her ready access to grass. She is (not always correctly) assumed to have automatic access to everything the urban witch misses, and no challenges of her own, but the author mostly manages to stay focussed on resolving the frustrations of the urban witch rather than perpetuating the myth that everything is perfect once you get to the countryside, and thus hopefully avoids feeding further dissatisfaction in the urban witch.

I found the implicit complaint about the nanny-state came across with an edge of a rant rather than the humour I think it was probably intended to have, which was a shame. It stood out enough as a sore spot that I wanted to address it:

I would like to kindly offer, if it is of any comfort to the author, or any other readers, that they might consider joining those of us who see Trick or Treating differently. We see it not as an offensive, greedy, materialistic American import, but as the echo of guising, a tradition which was recorded in Scotland in the 1800s, before any transatlantic export started. Certainly the kids don't perform poems or songs for their rewards much nowadays, and on rare occasions the trick holds actual threat, but they do dress up in (dis)guise in the hope of rewards of sweet food or money which is leaves them at the core the same practice. So it really is just guising or galoshans after all, maybe a little updated and adapted to it's modern mostly urban environment, but at it's roots the same thing. In fact it has undergone very much the kind of adaptation which traditional witches are healthily encouraged to do in order to continue to practice in the urban environment in this very book. Guising has just acclimatised, then adapted and on top of that improvised with what is available in adopting Trick or Treat as the currently acceptable calling phrase in the same way that the ancient venerated pagan yew may sit happily in the christian churchyard. It's still the same thing underneath.

All in all Traditional Witchcraft for Urban Living made a generally enjoyable read, with the odd challenge to ideas here and there. It was usefully stimulating to turn to and interestingly individual in it's voice. As a review of it's earlier incarnation of "Mean Streets Witchcraft" suggested, it is certainly possible if not likely that experienced urban witches might have come to many of these ideas themselves, however, the same could be said for many books and their ideas without it diminishing the value of the book at all. It doesn't claim to have groundbreaking or totally new ideas, just useful and practical, pragmatic ones. This it does.

Reading Traditional Witchcraft for Urban Living has left me interested in picking up copies of the Melusine Draco's other books. Which to me is the real tell-tale as to whether it was worth picking a book up in the first place. I very much hope they are all also printed on this very pleasant soft paper.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Traditional Yet Modern, 11 Feb 2012
By 
Miss W. Merrymoon "Willow Merrymoon" (West Yorkshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Draco's intention in writing this book is to demonstrate how it IS possible to be a traditional witch whilst living in a town or city, and her response to pagans who think it is almost impossible is "Tosh, tosh! And thrice tosh!" (p.1).

In addressing this, the author addresses many issues - recognising the countryside and wildlife that is right under the urban-dweller's nose; the absolute importance of psychically protecting oneself against all the encroaching negative influences that are so prolific in built-up environments; celebrating the festivals and observing the moon in a limited space and how to make that small space sacred; the development of the 'art of seeing', i.e. divination; ideas on how to create a green environment no matter where one lives; and the all-important question of 'where to next?'.

The author begins by pointing out that these days the vast majority of pagans live in towns and cities for convience sake, and that this inevitably raises the questions which rural dwellers need not consider, i.e., how is it possible to to manage from a practical viewpoint. Her answer is simply - "We get up close and personal" (p.2). In other words, adapt to the environment and see solutions, not problems. Draco offers some simple exercises to assist the reader in engaging with her suggestions, something which she does throughout the book and which are invaluable.

At this point, Draco also distinguishes between witchcraft and wicca. She uses the phrase "real witch', which seems to suggest that some people who call themselves witches are not 'real' ones. There are other points in the book where she uses the same phrase and this could be interpreted as arrogance. However, it does become more apparent as the book moves along, just what she is saying.

The author then goes on to bring to the reader's attention that 'countryside' is right where we are, e.g, plants, herbs and growing out of walls, by railway lines, in the wreck of disused buildings, in the park etc., and urban foxes, water voles, and even red kites in some places. One of Draco's distinctions between a real witch and others is that although there are people who can identify herbs and may use them in cooking, it is necessary to go further by knowing when and how to harvest them, what their medicinal uses are and how to make decoctions safely with them. It is becoming apparent at this point that Draco takes very much a no-nonsense approach and doesn't allow excuses for not knowing.

Moving on from there, Draco looks at what she terms the 'urban shadow-world', ie. the negative attitudes to witches historically and how that is carried over into the twenty-first century. Her cautionary words are that "anyone from any denomination, faith or creed who goes OTT in flamboyantly displaying symbols of their religion is automatically labelled a crank, so why should it be different for pagans?" (p.39). this naturally leads on to a discussion of ways for the witch to protect her/himself against attack.

Following on from that, she then goes on to look at the actual pratice of celebrating the Sabbats, giving a brief explanation of the meaning of each one. In order to practice it is essential to create sacred space and she offers various suggestions as alternatives to the usual nine-foot circle; to quote a good example, "When living-space is at a premium, one solution is to invest in one of those small Eastern prayer-mats.......it does offer a small but clearly defined area in which to work. This technique can also apply for anyone who is confined to a bedroom or a wheelchair" (p.59). This typifies the author's very practical approach to urban witchcraft, seeing answers and not issues.

On the subject of spells which would, of course, be carried out in sacred space, Draco refers to the importance of connecting with the right correspondes, e.g. days of the week, phase of the moon, and points out that it is not necessary to have masses of ritual equipments. "In the good old days, witches would have utilised whatever household items came to hand".

Next comes the subject of the 'Art of Seeing', ie.e divination, one of the basics of being a wtich, and, needing few props, is ideal for the urban-dweller. The author's list of divination techniques includes the usual ones such as cartomany and palmistry, but also some little-know ones, e.g. leconomancy - oil poured on water; sciomancy - the interpretation of the size and shape of shadows; and zoanthropy - an interpretation of the flames of three candles in a triangular formation. The author also makes a very important point, that only information can be gained form books and that real knowledge on this or any other subject can only be gained through dedicationa dn practice.

Moving on to the creation of 'green space' in an urban environment as an alternative to open fields and woods in rural areas, Draco again makes very simples suggestions such as herbs on the window-sill, and plants anywhere from hanging baskets to bin-sheds and coal bunkers. She also offers a beautiful ritual for the dedication of green space, making the reader realize just how little space is truly necessary.

The penultimate chapter focuses on spiritual transformation, exploring the question of whether a person can have spirtual beliefs and practices with being affiliated to any religion. This naturally leads on to look at the difference between faith and religion, and ultimately to questions of the distinction between magical ethics and morals. Towards the end of the chapter the book seems to have come full circle in returning to the question of whether a person is witch or wiccan/pagan. This is done in such a way as to help the reader identify their own answer by engaging with a searching exercise.

In her very important final chapter, Draco addresses the issue of whether a person goes down the route of engaging with the typically 'New Age' practices and products, usually resulting in focus on a (spiritual) world in which calm, peace and tranquillity are the norm; or whether one gets to grips with the not-so-comfy aspects of spiritual development, much of what by it's nature may be considered scary. She makes the point that the person who opts for the latter can expect to be often misunderstood by the former, again using the term 'real witch' in describing how that person must be willing to acknowledge and experience 'the dark night of the soul'. What Draco seems to be saying, but doesn't do so directly is that it's okay to take the 'New Age' (my words), but that those people ought then to describe themselves as pagan/wiccan, rather than witch.

One final quote from Draco is "The mysteries are there.....but they can only be fully understood through personal dedication and experience".

So, has the author fulfilled her intention in writing this book? The answer has to be a loud and resounding yes. It is a truly remarkable book, absolutely invaluable for both its practical aspects and its spiritual/magical application. If at time Draco comes across as not tolerating fools gladly, so to speak, it is because she is absolutely dedicated to her craft and utterly passionate about it. She speaks from the deepest conviction. An absolute must-have which is easy to read and truly riveting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well worth reading, 13 May 2014
With the number of books available nowadays that address the solitary practitioner, it's surprising to see how very few of them focus on one concrete common fact - that most of us witches (or pagans) do not live in a small cottage in the countryside, surrounded by fairy-tale forests and herbs. That many of us live in flats, inside blocks, in the middle of the city. If you are lucky enough, you'll have a small house with a garden. If you are even luckier - and your job allows you to do so - you'll live in the suburbs. Even though most of the books mention that likely possibility, they do it in a rather `patronising' way - IF one cannot go out to gather herbs, there's the `possibility' to use those in our kitchen. Personally I consider that that's showing the reader that "it's not very nice" but "it should work", making him or her not appreciate what she's using and regarding it as a "second hand element" (and we all know how important it is, for our practice, the feeling we put into something.)

In Traditional Witchcraft for Urban Living, Melusine Draco dedicates the whole of this small volume to address this situation. Mainly offering a useful way to develop our Craft practice in what she describes as "an hostile environment" - instead of just stating the obvious inconveniences that we have. The surprising bit is that she doesn't achieve this through the seeking of `exceptions', of `country-like' places in the city - she encourages the witch to rediscover the city, to look into it, and to change her (or his) attitude rather than getting stressed by the daily noises coming from the street. In short, she encourages us to make the best of what we've got. She guides us to small places in our city or our own house that may have been overlooked. In each chapter she also offers a useful exercise related to the subject.
Alder Lyncurium - Wiccan Rede
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Carys Llewellyn: Freelance writer and book reviewer, 17 Sep 2014
As the person who first recommended this title commented: “I was resentful of this book until I realise it had been written for someone exactly like me – a traditional witch who was forced to live in an urban area through circumstances rather than choice”. Unlike many other pagan writers, Draco is not dismissive of urban witchcraft and comes up with some very useful (and practical) suggestions for dealing with the trials and tribulations of living in close proximity to so many negative energies generated by our neighbours! Read the chapter ‘The Urban Shadow World’ and you’’ never look at a trip to Tescos in the same light again – because, as the author reminds us, each time we come home, we unintentionally bring in negative energy whenever we open the door. Much of what Draco writes is pure common sense but the way she encourages us to re-examine and adapt to our environment is aimed at creating a protective bubble to keep the ‘outside’ world at bay. Sometimes what a city, suburban or town witch needs is some good, plain old-fashioned common sense and ‘Traditional Witchcraft for Urban Living’ offers that aplenty including discreet observances and celebrations, and simple magical techniques for confined spaces. A great book for beginners.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The books are more like a concise study course guiding the aspiring witch, 16 Sep 2014
By 
Sophia (Shropshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Traditional Witchcraft for Urban Living (Kindle Edition)
Traditional Witchcraft for Urban living is the first in the Traditional Witchcraft series of books. The books are more like a concise study course guiding the aspiring witch, (not wiccan a completely different creature altogether) through the initial starting point of embarking on the path of being a Traditional Witch and goes to show that you don't have to be a typical country dweller to connect to the old gods of nature, even in the built up inner city one can still connect and this book helps you set out on the path of being a Traditional Witch I recommend the others in the series to follow on Melusine Draco's teachings.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Common sense witchcraft for the urban dweller, 31 Oct 2014
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This review is from: Traditional Witchcraft for Urban Living (Kindle Edition)
I must admit, even after 20 years as a practising witch I have found myself asking the question . Am I really a witch If I don't live in the countryside? The author very practically answers that question - of course I am.

While I don't agree 100% with everything that is here, I cannot fault the research and common sense approach which has gone into writing this book.

Ways of bringing nature into even the tiniest city flat are presented. Whether that be from creating a corner garden of potted herbs or discovering the hidden gems growing up between the cracks in the sidewalk. Wildlife abounds as well from birds flying overhead to the animals living along he banks of rivers and canals, and urban foxes living within our midst. The author points out this very obvious fact, something which many an urban witch may have glossed over "But they live in the city, they're not really nature." Well of course they are!

I would recommend this book to any witch, urban or country dweller. In this day there are plenty of people who have moved into the countryside or a small village to escape the city's blight, but still don't see the world and the nature around them. This book will help bring the natural world back into your life, and your witchcraft.

Find me at Writings of a Pagan Witch at WordPress dot com.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This is a great book and well worth having on the bookshelf, 18 Sep 2014
This review is from: Traditional Witchcraft for Urban Living (Kindle Edition)
This is a great book and well worth having on the bookshelf. Not all of us have the opportunity for whatever reason to be able to enjoy the wide open spaces of nature on our doorstep. The book shows that nature always finds a way to be a part of the landscape whether in a city or in the country. It will show how to utilize it no matter how small and use it as part of our working practice.
This book is well worth the look.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Life as an urban witch, 17 Sep 2014
Melusine Draco explains how today's witchcraft practitioners can and do adapt to the modern urban environments within which many of us live. The unmanaged pockets of scrubland, watercourses, rivers and wealth of animal life within the city provide the raw materials for the urban witch as much as the hedgerows, fields and woodlands do for our country cousins.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A little judgemental but otherwise very informative, 29 Oct 2014
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This review is from: Traditional Witchcraft for Urban Living (Kindle Edition)
alot of info and written in a friendly matter. lots of tid bits of facts and info along with being jam packed of good ideas and help. at random times the author seems a little angry and judgmental of some people's practices and you feel as if you're being told off! but all in all a really good book I will dip into again and again
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5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for those need to practice authentically but do ..., 17 Sep 2014
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This review is from: Traditional Witchcraft for Urban Living (Kindle Edition)
Essential reading for those need to practice authentically but do not live in the middle of nowhere. This book keeps it realistic and teaches how to make the most of urban living and to find the green amongst the concrete.
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