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37 of 54 people found the following review helpful
on 20 February 2012
It's about time some true libertarian did an expose of the greatest scam in modern history ,and Delingpole has done just that with this long overdue book .The eco-twits will be up in arms over this ''denial heresy ''and are unlikely to forgive the author in a very long time for his penetrating witt and shameless blasphemy...the pseudo-scientific cult of ''global warming '' is a result of the incestious relationship between junk science and political ideology
The modern enviromentalist movement is a hybrid of elements of both of the secular ideologies of the 2oth century ....the anti-capitalism /spread the wealth of socialism and the neo-paganism /anti humanism of Nazism ...hence the term ''watermellons ''...red on the inside and green on the outside ...the Nazi movement was also a back to nature , romantic pagan , green movement , but with a demonic emphasis on race and nationalism
In a broader sense , looking at these events through a wide angle historical lens , the enviromentalist movement is the return of pre-christian paganism dressed up in a high tech veneer , that is trying to fill the emotional void left by the undermining of christendom by science ...the problem is that with the return of neo-paganism comes the return of PAGAN VALUES that bodes an ill wind for the future of the West
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48 of 70 people found the following review helpful
Chapter Six has the intrepid Dellers at the Heartland Institute's Fourth Annual Conference on Climate Change in Chicago - enjoying the lavish hospitality from Big Oil, or so we are led to believe.

He is amongst principled people, he says, several of whom have become his personal heroes. And the last thing he wants to do is make them feel unwanted. Nevertheless, he goes on to attempt just that. It really doesn't matter how many brilliant papers Roy Spencer produces on cloud cover feedback, he writes:

"... or how many times that Nils-Axel Mörner proves that sea levels show absolutely no sign of dangerous increase. This is a debate that no sceptic scientist can possibly win, no matter how much apparently overwhelmingly persuasive evidence they produce. That's because the debate was never about 'the science' in the first place. It was, is and always will be about politics."

Latterly, this is the theme to which Dellers returns in his current blog. But the text comes from this superb book, Watermelons, which needs to find a space on the bookshelf of everybody who wants to understand how the world works.

The reason it should have such wide appeal is that, while it comes into the category of "global warming", it is in fact an intensely political book. The sub-title tells all, identifying the subject of the book, the threat that is "killing the planet, destroying the economy and stealing your children's future" - the watermellons, a "handful of political activists, green campaigners and voodoo scientists.

As you might imagine, though, Dellers does not pull punches. In his own forthright style, he writes of a green religion, where the core beliefs are "dressed up as a concern for nature and the future of mankind" and rooted in the most bitter misanthropy and direst pessimism. The advocates:

"... care little for the human species' myriad achievements, preferring to see our race as a blot on the landscape, a parasite, a disease which threatens the eco-system's otherwise perfect balance and which should at best be reduced by natural means - at worst ruthlessly culled."

In scrutinising the political agenda behind greenery, this is a book that needed to be written, but it is a book that had me cursing the man for writing it so well. As one who reserves such books for bedtime reading, consuming a few pages at a time before drifting off to sleep, he kept me awake for many hours as his riveting narrative made Morpheus an unwelcome guest.

Dellers's deft touch, exhibited throughout the book, takes us through a range of topics, from the nature of scares, a remarkable analysis of the first Climategate scandal, a potted history of the climate change agenda, and the costs of the obsession, to an excellent review of how "the bastards" are getting away with "the biggest and most expensive scientific scandal in history".

If I have a favourite section, though, it is in Chapter Eight, in which Dellers welcomes us to "the New World Order". It takes someone with his writing skills to give the subject just enough gravitas to make his arguments credible, yet confer sufficient lightness to avoid bogging us down in the swamp of conspiracy theory.

He thus romps us through many serious matters, such as the Club of Rome, and its sister organisations, the Club of Budapest and the Club of Madrid, ably writing of "master plans" and the like, without invoking the knee-jerk that has other books flying into the bin.

Keeping it light and humorous is one of Dellers's great skills - and only he could have us contemplating Charlie peeing on the compost heap as an introduction to "sustainable develpment". Despite this, one is left in no doubt that there are important issues at stake, with the sinister-sounding "Agenda 21" and many other warmist constructs, dragged out, eviscerated and sun dried.

Predictably, after its exposure in The Daily Mail, the book soared to number one in the global warming listings on Amazon, and has remained there ever since, briefly touching double figures in the overall best-seller rankings. As a book suitable for a wide and non-specialist audience, it deserves that ranking, and should become a standard primer on the politics of climate change.
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48 of 70 people found the following review helpful
on 16 February 2012
This book is well written, fast paced and well researched. Don't listen to the idiots who will attack anything that doesn't support their religion of Man Made Climate Change.

If you're a fully registered nutjob to the climate change cult then nothing is likely to change your mind. This book is for people who don't believe everything they're told by politicians and the "scientists" the politicians pay.

All is explained inside!
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16 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on 4 July 2012
Just finished "Watermelons" by James Delingpole. While he is a bit tougher on the science and scientists that are often blamed for misrepresenting the "consensus" and promoting "alarmism" that I am (I acknowledge that the vast bulk of scientists involved in climate research are entirely ethical and honestly express the doubts and unknowns, even if these are seldom acknowledged in the MSM or by politicians), I think that he highlights the socio-political elements of the entire AGW "scam" very well indeed, even if I think he is reaching in places regarding what is actually happening with the climate. Most valuable, perhaps, is his dissection of the funding levels relative on both "sides" of the argument - the idea that "sceptics" are massively funded by Big Oil and Big Coal and that the AGW crowd languish as under-funded victims is ludicrous and comprehensively dispelled.

I am a "luke-warmer" - climate change happens. All the time. There is even a small chance that we are a causal or acceleratory factor in that change. But I reject the social and political drives towards combating something we are not sure is combatable (or even a major threat). I reject the hysterical alarmism. I wonder at the thinking behind cutting the UK's carbon emissions when China would make up the deficit for an entirely carbon neutral EU in a matter of years. I reject the idea that there is a "scientific consensus" on the grounds that such a thing cannot and does not exist, and that the mere idea of it existing contravenes scientific neutrality and the scientific method.

I also reject the democratic-deficit behind much of the political machine that is rolling over all of us on the name of AGW. I wonder at the "coincidental" similarities between the mantra of those that are pushing for more internationalism and "action" on climate change and the anti-capitalists, anti-Western, anti-democratic movements that typify the "left". I reject the idea that technocratic governance by unelected "experts" is desirable - and that is what we have when entities like the UN and its IPCC are influencing policy so dramatically.

Read the book. It will enrage some of you with specific areas of expertise. The scientists among you will rail at some of Delingpole's conclusions. The true-believers will turn to incestuously validated counter-arguments that have become "stock" rebuttals despite being tenuously based in fact or objectivity. The "deniers" will find much to validate their beliefs.

But for no other reason, read it because it highlights the existence of far more centralisation and ideology behind the current "movement" than even I suspected existed. It has solidly reinforced my "scepticism" and disdain for the political, media, scientific and social "progressives" who are using AGW as an excuse to further their own agendas, not to mention those groups (looking at you Goldmann-Sachs) cynically pushing it only to make enormous piles of money from the whole thing.
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64 of 94 people found the following review helpful
on 16 February 2012
A very well written and insightful book about the dangers of blindly conforming to a spurious consensus in matters concerning science and it's process.

Pointing out the absurdity of employing the fallacy of simple enumeration when it comes to judging the worth of a hypothesis that hasn't yet risen to the status of a theory is a worthwhile public service.

It is worth noting that Ian Keith Shaw's deceit in failing to acknowledge Nurse's complete ignorance concerning one of the fundamentals in this area, ignorance which was compounded by Dr Bindschadler and the failure of the BBC's supposedly professional editing process is typical of those with an axe to grind. I should add that least Dr Bindschadler had the integrity to acquire a DT account so that he could visit the authors blog and make an apology, something Paul Nurse has manifestly failed to do.

Further I would point out that Martin Lack's somewhat whimsical habit of denigrating books he has not actually read is infamous on Amazon and has led to much well deserved derision.

Irrespective of all that I would suggest you read the book for yourself and make up your own mind. After all being sceptical and educating yourself is not something to be ashamed of but rather something to be encouraged.
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47 of 69 people found the following review helpful
on 16 February 2012
James Delingpole is a brilliantly outspoken and funny writer and this latest work on the subject of Climate Change, aka Catastrophic Manmade Global Warming, and all things politically Green, will have you laughing and tutting from beginning to the end. He does not pull his punches and he lets all kinds of theories fly without a care as to where they might fall or who they will hit. You might agree with him, you might not, but you will certainly enjoy the story he has to tell.
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46 of 68 people found the following review helpful
on 28 February 2012
James Delingpole is a witty writer, he frames his prose as a rant that blasts its way from the first page to the last. Yet the real genius in his writing is to sum up every sceptical argument concerning CAGW succinctly and also identify the force that drives the so called consensus science. Within a breathless couple of chapters the circumstances that exposed climate science: climategate is exposed and analysed, most importantly the very fact that four independent investigations `proved' that there was no wrong-doing in its self displayed to the world how eco-Nazis operated. Free-market capitalism is open and honest when compared to the cultural communism of the watermelons, and I can understand James' link having read the book.

In the 1978 film The Invasion of the Body Snatchers- copies of freethinking humans emerge from intergalactic pods which reminded me of watermelons. The Left-greenies- eco-Nazis are much the same, their science is just like real science, their freedom appears to be just like ours but its not. The ideological war is not between left or right but between those who want a small government and those protecting the behemoth of tax and spend, control and regulate government. Big government provides the cover for greenies to operate in, regulated media like the BBC allows the message to spread,

James Delingpole gives us a fascinating glimpse into the world of the climate sceptic and what motivates them. James is a great spoofing author and his parody is unsurpassed- I urge all those convinced of AGW to read this book .
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42 of 62 people found the following review helpful
on 15 February 2012
It seems everyone is banging on about manmade climate change these days (the scientific theory formerly known as Global Warming). Well, whether you are a realist or Warmist you must read this book.

Is our climate is changing? Yes. And it always has. But the real question is are humans exacerbating it and if not why are poeple promoting the anthropomorphic theory? Cui bono?

There will be those who moan and gripe that the author is not a scientist, which is true, but his copious footnotes show he roots his work in scientific research. As such his argument labelling Warmist Theory as "the fastest growing religion of the modern age" is hard to refute.
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48 of 71 people found the following review helpful
on 16 February 2012
Many years ago, I watched a BBC Horizon documentary that predicted the world's oil supply would run out by 1995. When the BBC began to promote the man-made global warming story, I was sufficiently sceptical to try to look into the science. To cut a long story short, I soon became a "denier".
There are a number of books that demonstrate why Mann-made global warming is the greatest scandal in the history of science. "The Deniers" by Lawrence Solomon shows how the world's best scientists rejected the "consensus"; "The real Global warming disaster" by Christopher Booker gives a good history of the crusade against CO2; "The climate Caper" by Garth Paltridge is also well worth reading.
Where Delingpole breaks new ground is in his description of the ideology that underpins the Greens - an ideology that believes economic growth is bound to ruin the planet, that there are just too many people polluting the earth, that capitalism and democracy will have to abolished so that an enlightened elite can impoverish everyone. The extent to which people and organizations from the Duke of Edinburgh to the UN have been captured by this ideology is alarming.
This is a book that everyone should read, before the lights go out.
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36 of 54 people found the following review helpful
on 16 February 2012
A book that concerns itself with the politics behind the extreme Green movement, that now affects us all. An entertaining book about important issues. Highly recommended.
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