Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:    (0)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating if difficult tone poem of a film
John Akomfrah has spent his career creating films that are more 'tone poems' about a subject than literal narrative or documentary. Combining
newsreel footage with often surreal images he shoots, and sometimes an audio collage approach to sound, Akomfrah's films are by turns brilliant,
frustrating, effective, sophomoric and just plain unique. Some of the films...
Published on 25 Aug. 2012 by K. Gordon

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A Mystifying Film
This is an unusual film. Many references to the Frozen North vis-a-vis migration of people to said region from warmer climes, such as Africa; the film does not make it clear why? but that's not the point of the film. I was wondering whether the film is a portrayal of the reaction of people arriving into the frozen North. There is no clear narrative to give us any sense of...
Published 28 days ago by Glen1975


Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating if difficult tone poem of a film, 25 Aug. 2012
By 
K. Gordon - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Nine Muses [DVD] (DVD)
John Akomfrah has spent his career creating films that are more 'tone poems' about a subject than literal narrative or documentary. Combining
newsreel footage with often surreal images he shoots, and sometimes an audio collage approach to sound, Akomfrah's films are by turns brilliant,
frustrating, effective, sophomoric and just plain unique. Some of the films 'work' better than others for me, but I suspect that is a subjective reaction,
and one that could easily change on repeated viewings.

In short, these are more like films you'd see playing as an installation in an art museum than at your local cinema, which probably explains why so
little of Akomfrah's impressive body of work is available on home video.

The Nine Muses (2010) takes as it's `subject' Africans and others emigrating to England after WW II, and the difficulties in assimilating, as shown in numerous and well
chosen old film clips. But the film combines those clips with gorgeous, lightly surreal newly shot images of two unidentifiable men in parkas against the background of
Alaska while on the soundtrack great writers from Homer to Beckett are read aloud by great actors (from Naxos' recorded book series, most many years old). The reading
with the most clear thematic connection is "The Odyssey" and it's tale of a difficult journey. But all the readings echo the immigrant experience, if sometimes in a very
oblique way. At the same time, the score is a mix of all sorts of music, often crashing into and playing on top of each other (more on assimilation? Loss of identity?)

I'll admit, by the end of the 93 minutes, I was starting to burn out a little on the lack of clear connection and context between these images, words, and the eclectic score.
But like poetry, this is a film that transcends logic to create a mood more than a story or point. And while I don't think it all works, I salute Akomfrah for being
willing to challenge his audience with something experimental and different.

If you happen to have a region free (or region 1) player, the U.S. has a 2nd disc with two interesting shorter films of Akomfrah's "Seven Songs for Malcolm X"
and "The Last Angel of History". I don't think either film is quite as strong as "The Nine Muses" (though both are a little more 'accessible'), but if you're interested
in the body of Akomfrah's work, that may be a better deal.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars A Mystifying Film, 3 Mar. 2015
This review is from: The Nine Muses [DVD] (DVD)
This is an unusual film. Many references to the Frozen North vis-a-vis migration of people to said region from warmer climes, such as Africa; the film does not make it clear why? but that's not the point of the film. I was wondering whether the film is a portrayal of the reaction of people arriving into the frozen North. There is no clear narrative to give us any sense of this. We are, however, regaled with cinematic footage of cold scenes from the past and the present. There's a sense of atmosphere here; is this what people experienced for the first time; the cold touching all five senses - a unique experience? Who knows? Having said that, just watch, absorb and experience - could it be narrative is around empathy, getting to see things from the eyes of who experienced the frozen north for the first time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Didn't like this film., 27 Mar. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Nine Muses [DVD] (DVD)
I didn't really like the film. I was quite disappointment in general even though it has great moments. I would not watch it again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Nine Muses [DVD]
The Nine Muses [DVD] by John Akomfrah (DVD - 2012)
£4.80
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews