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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes, it is the same author ...
Buckeridge, contrary to the impression many of his fans have of him, was a lifelong socialist. He clearly wrote this book with the partial intention of distancing Jennings from those who were using him to express a longing for the supposed certainty and order of the 50s (in many cases supporting private armies) and lamenting the country supposedly "falling apart" (this...
Published 24 months ago by Robin Carmody

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3.0 out of 5 stars Not really Jennings
Oh dear! A nice enough story, but not really Jennings. Darbishire and the other boys barely feature, and their characters are somewhat sketchy. Darbishire seems to have developed the ability to run from somewhere, purely to fit a plot device. He's certainly not the Darbishire who came last in the 400 yards race so spectacularly in Jennings Follows a Clue! Reads...
Published on 24 Mar 2012 by M. J. Penny


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes, it is the same author ..., 27 July 2012
This review is from: Jennings At Large: 1 (Paperback)
Buckeridge, contrary to the impression many of his fans have of him, was a lifelong socialist. He clearly wrote this book with the partial intention of distancing Jennings from those who were using him to express a longing for the supposed certainty and order of the 50s (in many cases supporting private armies) and lamenting the country supposedly "falling apart" (this was published the same year as the Sex Pistols and the NF riot in Lewisham, close to where Aunt Angela lives), so he deliberately exaggerated the difference from the usual Jennings milieu to make a political point which, for me, redeems and legitimises his earlier work and removes any guilt I might feel at the great pleasure I continue to take in it. He seems to be using it (alas, unsuccessfully) to defend the left-wing part of consensus politics from both nascent Thatcherism and militant hard-leftists - it is significant that the block of flats is called Gaitskell Court, for a start.

Yes, of course it doesn't make sense in terms of a logistical timeline, but there had *already* been far too many books with Jennings staying the same age for that to be any kind of issue; long before this, we'd had to accept that the Jennings books existed in their own universe where the normal rules of time do not apply. We can accept that in overt fantasy; why can't we accept it in Buckeridge? Linbury Court in the 50s *was* close to a fantasy, a far nicer place than the vast majority of prep schools then - no caning ever mentioned, no real snobbery to speak of (in one written c. 1965 Mr Wilkins does refer to "morons screaming at a pop singer" but so would have many working-class socialists back then) - so even then, his politics were showing. More generally, the stick this book continues to get from a certain sort of person shows that Buckeridge's plan worked. It seemingly riles and unsettles their politics, and as a leftist Jennings fan, I can only see that as a good and redemptive thing.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not really Jennings, 24 Mar 2012
This review is from: Jennings At Large: 1 (Paperback)
Oh dear! A nice enough story, but not really Jennings. Darbishire and the other boys barely feature, and their characters are somewhat sketchy. Darbishire seems to have developed the ability to run from somewhere, purely to fit a plot device. He's certainly not the Darbishire who came last in the 400 yards race so spectacularly in Jennings Follows a Clue! Reads rather like an Enid Blyton novel, but transposed into the right-on 70s, with council flats, intransigent housing departments, issues over countryside access and the like. Even Mr Wilkins seems to have mellowed to an unfeasible degree. And since when was Aunt Angela a social worker? Read it for the sake of completeness, but expect a surreal experience.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Jennings at Large, 19 May 2011
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Keen Reader "lhendry4" (Auckland, New Zealand) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Jennings At Large: 1 (Paperback)
I have really fond memories of Jennings, and remember sitting outside in the summer when a youngster reading all the Jennings books that I had. I can't remember how I got on to them but it must have been an adult in my life who put them in front of me, as I was just a young one at the time.

Those fond memories of Jennings, Darbishire and their friends at Linbury Prep have remained with me all these years and it's a great joy now to be able to find some of the other Jennings books that I have never read and never found in the old fashioned book shops.

This is the first of the batch of `missing' ones that I have purchased that I have now read, and it was lovely to sink back into those childhood stories. This one differs from many of the other Jennings stories in that they are not at school for much of action, but rather on an end of term camping holiday and then Jennings stays with his Aunt, where he makes some new friends and causes some different sorts of chaos.

A tried and true formula with Jennings and his antics; but one that any Jennings fan will thoroughly enjoy and chuckle over.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Was This The Same Author?, 12 Aug 2010
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Sir Furboy (Aberystwyth, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Jennings At Large: 1 (Paperback)
A later Jennings book. It is like it is not even the same author. Also like it doesn't know what age it should be set in. Is this still the 1950s? Or is it now the late 1970s? Decimal money and reference to lunar landings suggests the latter, but it is not quite clear (and Jennings is *still* only 12).

This story is mostly not set in school, and takes land owners to task over blocked footpaths and what sounds like a council house system to task for being cruel to Aunt Angela. Jennings also *gasps* makes friends with a girl.

I would not be surprised if this was ghostwritten to capitalise on the success on the earlier books when Collins were reprinting them in the 1970s.

Not terrible, but definitely not Jennings.
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