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105 of 109 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Fault in Our Stars
Let me start out by saying that this book ripped my heart from my chest, crumpled it and then proceeded to throw it on the ground and trample on it in the most beautiful way imaginable.
I was slightly hesitant going into this book as I don't read many contemporary novels, and it was so hyped up by both friends and reviews I've read/seen about it that I was sure I was...
Published 14 months ago by Alexandra

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82 of 93 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed feelings
Hazel was diagnosed with metastatic thyroid cancer at the age of thirteen. Three years later the disease is being kept at bay indefinitely thanks to an experimental new drug. Her days are spent carting her oxygen tank between college, home, and Cancer Kid Support Group. Her treatment regime means that she has little time for friends her own age, and besides, now that...
Published on 15 Jan. 2013 by Marie


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Boring!!! Very Disappointing, 18 Jan. 2015
After reading all the 5 * reviews, and after watching the film, I couldn't wait to get the kids to bed and get sat down to read this in peace. The film was by far one of the saddest films i have ever watched, truly an amazing film. Unfortunately though, the Book is probably one of the most boring books i have ever read! I was really struggling about a quarter of the way through, but i persevered as i kept telling myself it would get better. However, i did finish it and was so disappointed. I think alot of these 5* are being based on the actual film, and not the book which is totally misleading.

I certainly wouldn't recommend this to anyone. The film yes, but not the book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AMAZE, 23 Aug. 2014
This is one of my favourite books ever. It is about a girl named Hazel Grace Lancaster and her battle with Cancer. It shows exactly how life is like battling cancer, like how you are scared that when you die your parents won't have a chance at another life and how you have to do things you don't want to but you still try to have a normal life. Hazel has to go to support group where she meets Augustus Waters and they fall in love. I think that it is very honest and hard hitting and quite sad so it might not be for you. I think this book deserves 5 stars because it is IMPOSSIBLE to put down.

If you like this book I would recommend books such as Wonder and Looking For Alaska
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202 of 234 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As Emotionally Devastating As It Is Exquisitely Written, 12 Jan. 2012
This is John Green at his best and oh is that good. The characters are beautifully drawn and heartbreakingly realistic, Hazel Lancaster doesn't represent anything and her suffering and that of her peers isn't meant to make any kind of point. It's just what it is, suffering. Equally so Hazel is simply Hazel, a girl who watches really trashy TV and loves long novels and poetry.

In being just an ordinary teenage girl she really fancies a boy and here is where we come across Augustus Waters, the boy who clenches death itself between his teeth just to prove it doesn't own him.

Through these two characters we are shown every agonizing moment of living with cancer and the fight not only to carry on living but to stop it from consuming your mind and your personality. The book seems to pose the question, if your entire personality has become nothing but the need to fight and survive cancer and there is no longer room for joy or even love, then in what way is that living?.

A large part of this struggle takes place within family circles, the parallel desperation and monotony of having a child with cancer is skilfully and subtly made evident by Green.

Ultimately Green strives to portray his characters not as those fighting cancer are often shown, forced into playing the role of brave and wise soldiers stoically enduring untold suffering. He shows them as they truly are, just people, beautiful wonderful people but people none the less. They have no choice but to keep fighting because they are given no other option and because to admit defeat means death.

It is not their struggle that defines them but who they are in spite of it, managing to live and to love and even have fun and laugh. They use every moment given to them in the most beautiful way possible and that is what makes them exceptional.

P.S. I didn't get a signed copy and I couldn't care less.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb, 21 Mar. 2015
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I had no idea this existed until I realised there was a movie with the same title. I have a golden rule of never watching a movie until I've read the book, so decided to get that out of the way. With a host of good reviews on Amazon, I really wanted to see for myself if it lived up to its popularity.

I'm sure it's fairly widely known that the story features two terminally ill teenagers (Hazel and Augustus), who meet at a cancer support group. It's an instant attraction, both mental and physical, and the encounter impacts their (short) lives.

Despite the fact that it's a little hard to believe the dialogue is coming out of the mouths of sixteen/seventeen-year-olds, the rather excessive use of Capitalized Phrases To Make a Point, and the plot stretching the imagination just a little too far, I really loved this book.

It's easy to get into and easy to love the characters without feeling pity for them. It's a love story, sprinkled with deep sadness and poignancy, but the writing is razor-sharp, witty, humorous, and engaging. I found it hard to put down, hard to accept that it had finished (note to self: read more John Green!) and can't wait to see the movie.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The fault in our stars - a review from a teenager, 15 Jan. 2012
I would say it is impossible for a book to be called flawless - "there's no way a a story could have no imperfections, the author is human after all" - but trust me when I say John Green's 'The fault in our stars' is absolutely flawless. I pretty much bought it because of it being signed (I am a huge a nedfighter) and I was not prepared for what would be behind the scribble. Although it is a "cancer story" it's unconventionality makes it both pleasantly surprising and refreshing. The tale itself is beautifully sad and brutally honest but the thing that makes this story so amazingly original and immortal is Green's astounding writing talent. In all my fourteen years of life (I admit it's not that long but I am a huge bookworm)I have never seen an author that writes so beautifully and genuinely that, not only the story but the actual words can bring tears to your eyes and that transfers emotion and feeling so well through their writing that you feel the world around you disappear and your'e not so much grabbed into the story but pulled into a third world between yours and the characters where you can't help yourself but have to watch their story unfold.
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111 of 129 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the fault in our stars, 17 Jan. 2012
By 
Ali (Scotland) - See all my reviews
"The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings."
- Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, for those wondering about the title.

I do not know where to start with this review. Actually, I will start by saying this review is completely biased as I consider myself to well and truly be a Nerdfighter (Nerdfighters will love the goat soap, and other, references) and, if I didn't live on another continent, I would totally stalk John Green. Nah, I wouldn't, I'm kidding. I'd stalk Hank. I have a humongous crush on Hank.

Anyways. Moving rather swiftly on.

This book is pretty emotional. John Green said on Tumblr that he wanted the reader "to feel all of the things". Well, I felt all of the things. I laughed (well, snorted - I laugh very rarely at books for some reason), I cried (a common occurrence, believe me), I snorted through my tears (flattering, I assure you). My chest ached with stifled sobbing. I couldn't stop myself reading until I had finished the book. And what a book.

It was not purely a Cancer Book. Yes it features a main character with terminal cancer and another who lost a leg to cancer (and a minor character who has lost his eyes because of cancer). But to me it was not a book that was primarily about dying or even living, it was about love. Romantic love, love between family and friends, love for books (Augustus being a bit of a nerd with his book choice and I loved him for it, as did Hazel) and trashy TV and love for living. Cancer did not define these characters.

Hazel was a great character. Her narrative appealed to me. It was witty and sarcastic without being mean. I enjoyed reading about her slowly, and then quickly, falling in love with Augustus and how and why she didn't want this (her cancer made her a "grenade" - something sure to hurt those around her) and then why she did. I think my favourite part about Hazel though, was her fondness for her parents. They, particularly her mother who had taken up the full-time role of hovering, as Hazel put it, clearly meant a lot to her and were possibly what helped her keep going.

I also liked Augustus (hello new book crush) a lot and the blind jokes he cracked with Isaac. As un-PC as they may be, there was a certain realism in that gallows humour that I enjoyed.

This book dealt with death. There's no getting away from it. It revolved around three teenagers with various types of cancer. It was a sad book. It was also a book that made me think. Think about courage, life, death. It mainly made me think about what happens to those left behind and what happens next. That was what was, and is, going through my mind as I read the story and as I write this jumbled mess of a review. I had the most hellish racking sobs when I realised who would eventually be left behind and how unfair that was.

Is it perfect? Nope. I found the plot a bit predictable, and ridiculous, if I'm being honest. Nothing came as a surprise, I saw it coming. The characters dialogue got on my wick a few times. The whole book quote thing and philosophising is fine in small doses but I wanted a few more typical teenagery conversations. These were small, minor niggly things though.

But do you know what? I don't care. The above issues didn't really dampen my overall enjoyment of this novel and I stick by my rating for it. I loved this book and I will eagerly await the next John Green novel.

Thank you, John Green, for ruining the next few books I read. They will just not compare to The Fault in Our Stars.

DFTBA.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars amazed and shocked me, 22 Dec. 2014
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I have started reading this book yesterday afternoon and finished it in 6 hours. I am under its spell soo much I cannot think of anything else. I have lost my dad to cancer 2 years ago so I went through the pain again only more intensified. This book inspired me, hurt me, made me laugh, made me think, amazed and shocked me, made me miss my Dad even more but most of all - made me want to make people believe in themselves and live their only 1 life in happiness and experience this world to the fullest. I want to inspire people and we are all scared of oblivion - but as She said in the book: it is inevitable. However, we do remember loved ones and we remember the good and bad which makes us all real.
I woke up with Hazel and Gus this morning and I will remember this story for the rest of my life. This book has changed me as a person and I can only thank the author for giving us such an astonishing work of art.

"You don't get to choose if you get hurt in this world, but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices. I hope she likes hers."
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I thought this was supposed to be good??, 15 Nov. 2014
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Why is this getting so many good reviews? I'm mystified! The writing is atrocious and the characterisations are a joke. Why do both Hazel and Gus speak in such a silly pretentious way all the time? Are we really supposed to accept that stupid novelist Peter Van Whatsit as a believable person? (he talks in a silly pretentious way too). Is this book intended to be moving, romantic, profound, or what? It didn't reach me on any level and I thought it a complete waste of time.

The romance between Hazel and Gus just didn't ring true - none of the relationships in the book did. It's like it was written by somebody who grew up in total isolation from the rest of the human race and consequently had absolutely no idea how people talk, act, or think.

Obviously thousands of fans are going to disagree with me, but personally I thought this story positively stank.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Underwhelming, 27 July 2014
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This review is from: The Fault in Our Stars (Paperback)
Just didn't do much for me at all. I've read a couple of John Green's books (who, as a person, I am a personal fan of) and I feel the same dissatisfaction whenever I finish one of his novels, that "is that it?" feeling. It's a tear baiter. But the bait sucks. The protagonists, I find to be obnoxious and, sorry to say it, very two-dimensional. They're too self-aware, I guess some people like that, and they hold themselves in very high esteem. Give me a reason to hold you in some esteem too. I read the book through intermittent rolls of my eyes. Hazel watches America's Next Top Model. Wow, how fascinating that she dumbs herself down to watch shows that millions of people enjoy. She's so human. Augustus walks around with an unlit cigarette in his mouth for crying out loud. Oh my God that's so ironic and deep. I can't remember his ridiculous reason for why, but all I know is that is some pretentious bullsh*t.

For a book that is so consciously trying to avoid being overtly sentimental, it all came across as crazily melodramatic and a more uptight version of Nicholas Sparks "A Walk to Remember". I was just really, really unimpressed. I'd still like to see the movie, because these kinds of stories play out pretty well on the screen. With a sappy soundtrack and a few heart-wrenching performances it may even get the tears it begging for. However, as I said, I like John Green and I'm glad for his success I will keep reading his books and hoping for better.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Life-changing and powerful, 3 July 2013
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This review is from: The Fault in Our Stars (Paperback)
A book that had been recommended to me several times and as I had enjoyed "An Abundance of Katherines" I was optimistic that I would enjoy this one too. I don't think anything quite prepared me for my emotional involvement though. I certainly wouldn't recommend reading in public because the tears are uncontrollable in places. On saying that though, the entire story is magical and often hilarious in places. Two of the strongest characters I have ever read, it is impossible not to feel attached to them and find yourself on the same emotional journey that they are travelling. Three weeks after finishing it, I still find myself thinking about it. I makes you understand the value of living (not just life) and is therefore one of those few books that can be regarded as inspirational. If I ever write a book half as good as this, I will feel as if I have achieved something worthy. Breathtaking.
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