Customer Reviews


5 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly enjoyable account of what makes cricket great
This is a delightful book, in which Rob Smyth attempts to deal with the virtually indefinable 'spirit of cricket'. Although there are many accounts of obvious examples, such as the cover picture of Flintoff and Lee in 2005, there are more varied and less expected areas of discussion too, such as the delight in genuine attacking cricket, or excellence in a particular...
Published on 4 Feb. 2011 by M. V. Clarke

versus
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Nice book, shame about the editing
There are few things in life more annoying than a potentially good book ruined by poor editing.
Take Rob Smyth's The Spirit of Cricket (subtitled 'what makes cricket the greatest game on Earth'). On almost every page, there is something that jars - a mistake, a typo, or something that just seems not quite right.
For example, why is Mike Brearley continually...
Published 22 months ago by WillFColombia


Most Helpful First | Newest First

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly enjoyable account of what makes cricket great, 4 Feb. 2011
By 
M. V. Clarke (Durham, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Spirit of Cricket (Hardcover)
This is a delightful book, in which Rob Smyth attempts to deal with the virtually indefinable 'spirit of cricket'. Although there are many accounts of obvious examples, such as the cover picture of Flintoff and Lee in 2005, there are more varied and less expected areas of discussion too, such as the delight in genuine attacking cricket, or excellence in a particular aspect of the game, such as Curtly Ambrose demolishing England in 1994. There are also fascinating inserts from many famous cricketing names on their understanding of the spirit of cricket. Highly recommended for cricket lovers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most Interesting, 1 Mar. 2013
By 
This review is from: The Spirit of Cricket: What Makes Cricket the (Kindle Edition)
This book brought back lovely memories. It brought to mind folk whose contribution has brought great enjoyment to many people.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Nice book, shame about the editing, 12 July 2013
By 
This review is from: The Spirit of Cricket (Hardcover)
There are few things in life more annoying than a potentially good book ruined by poor editing.
Take Rob Smyth's The Spirit of Cricket (subtitled 'what makes cricket the greatest game on Earth'). On almost every page, there is something that jars - a mistake, a typo, or something that just seems not quite right.
For example, why is Mike Brearley continually referred to as 'Michael' Brearley? Has he ever been referred to in any other situation as 'Michael' Brearley? Not as far as I know.
Later, we are told that Ian Botham's dismissal by Trevor Hohns in 1989 (you know the one - charging down the pitch before he had even got off the mark, and missing completely) is a good example of the spirit of cricket. Surely most right-minded people would think of it as the egocentric act of an over-the-hill cricketer, failing miserably to recapture the glory days of his past.
Another weird example is Garry Sobers' sporting declaration against England in 1967-68. This is apparently 'infamous', and one of the 'biggest of the few black marks' on Sobers' career. If so, why is it included in a book on the spirit of cricket?
And the structure is strange, too - divided into four apparently random, untitled chapters, with an introduction and conclusion whose content is indistinguishable from the rest of the book, and finishing with a 'Spirit of Cricket XI', in which many of the examples already mentioned are repeated.
To complicate things further, within each chapter are boxed-off contributions from some of the game's greats (including David Gower, Richie Benaud, Nasser Hussain...and Andy Bull). I am still unclear whether these should be read in isolation or as part of the main text, particularly when it is also necessary to contend with further unboxed but subtitled accounts of great matches.
These are just a few examples, but there are many more.
This is all doubly annoying, because the book could be so great. All the classic anecdotes are present and correct (the Dwayne Leverock catch, Johnners and Aggers falling apart on Test Match Special, Gary Pratt). We may have heard them a hundred times before, but when they are this good, who cares?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The Spirit of Cricket, 12 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Spirit of Cricket (Hardcover)
I have found this book essential reading for any Cricket devotee The layout is well considered and very well presented
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


28 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rob Smyth is the Hunter S Thompson of cricket writers...., 28 May 2010
By 
This review is from: The Spirit of Cricket (Hardcover)
....that is, he's mostly drunk, abusive and follically challenged. I doubt I'll even read it. But I haven't read the Bible either, and that seems to have shifted a few copies. Yeah, go on - buy it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews