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on 7 February 2012
So, almost a year ago Ministry Of Sound put out a 3 disc set titled "Anthems: Hip Hop," and it had over 30 real ground breakers in the musical genre of hip-hop. Now here it is, early 2012, and they are once again trying to capture lightning in a bottle. "Ministry Of Sound's Anthems: Hip Hop II" is a various artists 3 disc set of music of the highest order, more gems pulled from the 30 year plus history going back from the Boogie Down Bronx of New York City to the streets of London.

The list here this time around is impressive, from originators The Sugarhill Gang's "The Message" to Run-DMC's "It's Like That." the variety is rich, and fun, and takes me back personally, as when I first entered the Army in October 1984 I met 2 Black men who were from New York City as they were "spitting their rhymes" and playing Whodini's "Five Minutes Of Funk" on their cassette players FULL BLAST in the barracks, and most of us were like "what the heck is this?" Now, if you're under 25 and haven't heard of or at least have one of these songs on CD somewhere, you don't know (or will you recognize) these true classics of the genre.

Anyway, here's 54 songs on 3 CDs of great quality music. As in my last review, I didn't post the tracklist, but I'll give you the good and the bad, just like my other review here on Amazon:

CD 1 is nothing but classic 1980's hip-hop, for sure - N.W.A's "Express Yourself," Naughty By Nature's "O.P.P" and even Young MC's "Know How" is represented here. I'm so glad they haven't forgot some of the original women of hip-hop, like Roxanne Shante's "Roxanne's Revenge," and even Sweet T's "It's My Beat," which is so hip-hop it hurts my teeth it's so sweet!

CD 2 is all about the harder edge of the 1990's, and the West Coast/East coast rap war was in effect. Notorious B.I.G's "Juicy" jumps right out the gate, going to the Luniz' "I Got 5 On It" and even Cypress Hill's "Hits From The Bong," because these guys could roll a fat one like no rap group could and still drop rhymes onstage nonstop! A Tribe Called Quest's intelligent "Award Tour" and The Roots' deep cut "Good Music" only serves that using one's brain can work for you in hip-hop, and they are among the finest spitters of the truth. A special note is the ultimate tongue-twisting hard real raps of Smoothe Da Hustler and Trigger The Gambler's "Broken Language," which has the distinction of being nothing more but a duet, and an insane 4 minute one line poem with no kind of hook or anything. It's legendary, and this CD represents the history of the time very well.

CD 3 is the 21st century, and right out the gate is 50 Cent, who made rap easily digestible and accessible to the masses, used in commercials and in movies over and over and over again, making him a millionaire. Rap and hip-hop was about the talent, but if this one CD proves anything, maybe not. For instance, the one and only late great Ol' Dirty Bastard's (featuring Kelis) track "Got Your Money" tells you that talent is kind of sort of something that maybe you can do, but still make a huge hit! At least 5 songs on this CD have been featured in commercials selling everything from cars to cellular phones, and if you listen to them, you'll know. Remember, hip-hop for many in this already crowded millenium is a ticket to monetary success, not just glory.

Once again, though, I got a little lost about about a few choices here, but once again this release is geared towards my English brothers and sisters, so I'm sorry if I can't accurately say the following songs, when I hear them, are wprthy of being on this collection:

Skinnyman "I'll Be Surprised"
Ty featuring Roots Manuva "So You Want More"
Dizzee Rascal "Fix Up Look Sharp"
Wretch 32 featuring L "Traktor"
Jim Jones "We Fly High (Ballin')"
J Cole "Work Out" - this has only been out there since June 2011!
Royce da 5'9 and Eminem "Writer's Block" - this is only been out there since March 2011!

I'm sorry, but the Ministry Of Sound, just like their first release, decided once again to include some popular flash in the pan songs in this collection. Some of these songs have been played for over thirty years (in some cases) and are just as inventive as they sounded when first released, but these seven? They don't deserve to be included here - remember, it's just my opinion. I don't really fault them as they're just trying to give us the "now" songs with the classics, but I always thought that when a record company gets their heads together they should put out a good product for the people, not just sneak a few songs in that are barely a year old!

In the end, the title implies that this is supposed to be strictly songs that are the truest of hip-hop, but I guess you have to sometimes sift through the blah stuff for the gems.

I still give this collection 5 stars, but just barely. Ministry Of Sound is a multi-dimesnional conglomerate of media, from music to TV shows to a lot more, but when you package something for mass sales, be sure to tell the complete truth, huh guys? I just hope down the road MOS puts out a package filled with all 3 CDs of actual anthems, not tack on a few throwaway songs by artists that might not be here in a few years at the end for pity's sake or to boost these artist's saggy sales.

Look at MOS' "Hip-Hop Anthems I," and look at the tracklist for the last 5 or so songs on CD 3. Do you recognize them? Are these songs worthy of the word "anthem?"

I think not.

You guys missed again.

(Thanks for reading, please let Amazon know if this review helped you, don't forget to leave me feedback if you'd like, and please check out my other reviews on the American version of Amazon.com!)
33 comments14 of 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 February 2012
So, almost a year ago Ministry Of Sound put out a 3 disc set titled "Anthems: Hip Hop," and it had over 30 real ground breakers in the musical genre of hip-hop. Now here it is, early 2012, and they are once again trying to capture lightning in a bottle. "Ministry Of Sound's Anthems: Hip Hop II" is a various artists 3 disc set of music of the highest order, more gems pulled from the 30 year plus history going back from the Boogie Down Bronx of New York City to the streets of London.

The list here this time around is impressive, from originators The Sugarhill Gang's "The Message" to Run-DMC's "It's Like That." the variety is rich, and fun, and takes me back personally, as when I first entered the Army in October 1984 I met 2 Black men who were from New York City as they were "spitting their rhymes" and playing Whodini's "Five Minutes Of Funk" on their cassette players FULL BLAST in the barracks, and most of us were like "what the heck is this?" Now, if you're under 25 and haven't heard of or at least have one of these songs on CD somewhere, you don't know (or will you recognize) these true classics of the genre.

Anyway, here's 54 songs on 3 CDs of great quality music. As in my last review, I didn't post the tracklist, but I'll give you the good and the bad, just like my other review here on Amazon:

CD 1 is nothing but classic 1980's hip-hop, for sure - N.W.A's "Express Yourself," Naughty By Nature's "O.P.P" and even Young MC's "Know How" is represented here. I'm so glad they haven't forgot some of the original women of hip-hop, like Roxanne Shante's "Roxanne's Revenge," and even Sweet T's "It's My Beat," which is so hip-hop it hurts my teeth it's so sweet!

CD 2 is all about the harder edge of the 1990's, and the West Coast/East coast rap war was in effect. Notorious B.I.G's "Juicy" jumps right out the gate, going to the Luniz' "I Got 5 On It" and even Cypress Hill's "Hits From The Bong," because these guys could roll a fat one like no rap group could and still drop rhymes onstage nonstop! A Tribe Called Quest's intelligent "Award Tour" and The Roots' deep cut "Good Music" only serves that using one's brain can work for you in hip-hop, and they are among the finest spitters of the truth. A special note is the ultimate tongue-twisting hard real raps of Smoothe Da Hustler and Trigger The Gambler's "Broken Language," which has the distinction of being nothing more but a duet, and an insane 4 minute one line poem with no kind of hook or anything. It's legendary, and this CD represents the history of the time very well.

CD 3 is the 21st century, and right out the gate is 50 Cent, who made rap easily digestible and accessible to the masses, used in commercials and in movies over and over and over again, making him a millionaire. Rap and hip-hop was about the talent, but if this one CD proves anything, maybe not. For instance, the one and only late great Ol' Dirty Bastard's (featuring Kelis) track "Got Your Money" tells you that talent is kind of sort of something that maybe you can do, but still make a huge hit! At least 5 songs on this CD have been featured in commercials selling everything from cars to cellular phones, and if you listen to them, you'll know. Remember, hip-hop for many in this already crowded millenium is a ticket to monetary success, not just glory.

Once again, though, I got a little lost about about a few choices here, but once again this release is geared towards my English brothers and sisters, so I'm sorry if I can't accurately say the following songs, when I hear them, are wprthy of being on this collection:

Skinnyman "I'll Be Surprised"
Ty featuring Roots Manuva "So You Want More"
Dizzee Rascal "Fix Up Look Sharp"
Wretch 32 featuring L "Traktor"
Jim Jones "We Fly High (Ballin')"
J Cole "Work Out" - this has only been out there since June 2011!
Royce da 5'9 and Eminem "Writer's Block" - this is only been out there since March 2011!

I'm sorry, but the Ministry Of Sound, just like their first release, decided once again to include some popular flash in the pan songs in this collection. Some of these songs have been played for over thirty years (in some cases) and are just as inventive as they sounded when first released, but these seven? They don't deserve to be included here - remember, it's just my opinion. I don't really fault them as they're just trying to give us the "now" songs with the classics, but I always thought that when a record company gets their heads together they should put out a good product for the people, not just sneak a few songs in that are barely a year old!

In the end, the title implies that this is supposed to be strictly songs that are the truest of hip-hop, but I guess you have to sometimes sift through the blah stuff for the gems.

I still give this collection 5 stars, but just barely. Ministry Of Sound is a multi-dimesnional conglomerate of media, from music to TV shows to a lot more, but when you package something for mass sales, be sure to tell the complete truth, huh guys? I just hope down the road MOS puts out a package filled with all 3 CDs of actual anthems, not tack on a few throwaway songs by artists that might not be here in a few years at the end for pity's sake or to boost these artist's saggy sales.

Look at MOS' "Hip-Hop Anthems I," and look at the tracklist for the last 5 or so songs on CD 3. Do you recognize them? Are these songs worthy of the word "anthem?"

I think not.

You guys missed again.

(Thanks for reading, please let Amazon know if this review helped you, don't forget to leave me feedback if you'd like, and please check out my other reviews on the American version of Amazon.com!)
22 comments11 of 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 February 2012
Having read some of the other Amazon reviews, even though they are largely positive reviews, I have to say I disagree with some of their points. This is a very well balanced compilation of hip-hop, not just suitable for entry-level fans but even seasoned veterans of the culture.

Each CD clearly covers a different era. What I really appreciate about the way this is compiled is that we get the commercial/crossover hits to ease us into each CD, then it takes you deeper with an array of classic anthems that genuinely cover all facets and sub-genres of the scene. When you reminisce back to each era, you didn't just have hardcore, gangsta, blunted/stoner, NYC street-hop, UK grime, conscious or backpacker head-nod rap - you had it all. And it's all well represented here.

CD1 is old school, kicking proceedings off in fine style. Considering this is a sequel (therefore much ground has already been very well covered), we're hit with some stone cold, familiar-but-still-timeless classics from the likes of Sugarhill, Grandmaster Flash, Run-DMC, NWA, Whodini, Jungle Brothers et al. Play these at any moment in any situation and you are guaranteed a positive reaction. This is followed by some quality, retro material from the same time - T La Rock, Stezo, JVC Force, B.D.P. and the mighty Ultramagnetic MC's. We even get DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince showing their skills before it all went Hollywood for them! NB. fact fans: this CD is not just 1980s as another reviewer incorrectly states, the hilarious Jackson 5-sampling 'O.P.P.' was from 1991 and 'Rapper's Delight' was 1979.

CD2 covers the 90s golden age. You start with the superstars Biggie, Jigga, Nas, Cypress Hill, The Wu, Fugees etc. at their prime. And again, once you get past the bigger hits at the beginning (all of which undeniable still bump hard!), things delve deeper. This time we get sublime classics from Mobb Deep, Common, KRS, Black Moon and Tribe. It's then rounded off by some real forgotten gems - including the likes of Souls Of Mischief, The Roots and Smoothe Da Hustler. This is certainly not a selection aimed at an uneducated audience as other reviewers insinuate, this is the real deal that would make any serious collector proud.

CD3 takes in the late 90s and brings it suitably up to date. Opening with big hits from Fiddy, Cube, O.D.B., Xzibit, DMX etc. you soon get a vivid picture of where hip-hop was/is now at. This CD then takes the opportunity to remind us that artists like De La Soul, Brand Nubian, EPMD and Pete Rock & CL Smooth are still making hot records that can get a party amped. We have a great snapshot of the UK scene too. I read the US reviewer on Amazon questioning these which seems somewhat unfair given a small amount of research on their part (reviewing their critical and commercial success) would soon prove their validity. SkinnyMan and Ty/Roots Manuva more than put in their work on the underground and shine bright with these tracks, arguably their finest cuts; whereas Mercury Award-winning Dizzie Rascal broke down barriers at the beginning of his illustrious career with this in-ya-face anthem. He certainly opened the door to newcomer Wretch 32 too, featured here with his excellent, hard-edged grime/hip-hop hybrid track that broke him into the mainstream. We then wrap it up with the club classic Jim Jones hit from 2006 that established the DipSet Capo's solo career, the biggest hit (and now club anthem) from recent US No.1 artist J Cole and a 2011 street classic from lyrical Detroit duo Royce and Em.

All in all this is a well rounded, highly enjoyable, well balanced selection - and perfect companion to the first volume (which covered 2Pac, Dre, Snoop, Public Enemy, Gang Starr, Big Pun etc.).

To my knowledge, there is only one artist signed to Ministry Of Sound included, and - in reply to the same Amazon reviewer's other incorrect accusation - the last three tracks on the previous volume were not only Top 5 hits but started life as credible specialist records (supported by Westwood, Choice FM etc.).

Looking forward to Anthems Hip-Hop III.
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on 6 June 2013
One thing - There is no recording of Camp-lo "lucini" on here. Otherwise a fairly sound compilation, though most hip-hop heads will have half the tunes on here already.
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on 14 February 2013
top album am that impressed going to purchase ministry of sound anthems hip hop 111 .i would recommend this album
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on 16 April 2014
many thanks for m new cd anthems 2 this is a great cd to my coplete collection of hip hop
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Ministry of Sound recently spoiled their reputation for well-assembled compilations with Anthems Alternative 80s - a record that was not in the least "alternative". In fact I was half-expecting there to be a Duran Duran single on "Hip Hop Anthems 2". OK so I am joking but at least this is something of a return to form for the label's non-dance compilations series.

The Ultramagnetic MCs make it on to the tracklist this time, having been previously omitted, but there's still no room for Stetsasonic, Mantronix, Ice-T or the Beastie Boys. Volume 2 contains more West Coast rap (I'm more of an East Coast man myself) than volume 1, so be warned: the uninitiated may well need to exercise their "hip hop muscle" before listening, as this one does drag a little in places for me. On the other hand, there are some real classics - "The Message" and "Rapper's Delight" to name but two, plus some good old skool selections, e.g. "Roxanne's Revenge". And, if you've never heard Biggie Smalls' arresting "Juicy" (sampling Mtume's "Juicy Fruit") before then you're in for a treat.

Since this is a Ministry of Sound release, there is inevitably a pop element (it certainly lacks the class of a Soul Jazz-type compilation) but it's so heavy-going (and not exactly "anthemic") in places that the newer poppier stuff (mostly to be found on disc 3) comes as something of a relief.

Once again, this 3CD set is an easy and good value way of getting some quality rap music in your record collection without having to dig too deep.
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on 29 May 2015
Good selection of songs. Can't complain
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on 13 February 2012
when i saw this cd on tv i thought it looked quite good and decided to grab it when i played it i only rely knew 2 or 3 songs the others were random junk i never heared before ...... not good ...
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on 4 July 2014
Great item, fast delivery, thanks!
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