Customer Reviews


51 Reviews
5 star:
 (41)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars wont you stay...this is a very beautiful love song
At last an adaptation of Austen that has not been turned into a chickflic. Persuasion is the most thoughtful of the novels, Austen at her most skilful and profound, so it is delightful that it has been adapted with similar confidence and subtlety. Our heroine is not a starlet but a young woman drained by disappointment and in this adaptation she really does gain radiance...
Published on 23 May 2012 by fabrice

versus
38 of 38 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful movie, shame about the quality
What was the point in repackaging this movie if the quality is worse and it's in the old TV format? I could see compression artefacts in the opening scenes and gave up watching. My original Australian release is better quality and in widescreen. It does not do justice to the movie in quality either but is better than this.
This is the best version of "Persuasion" and...
Published on 4 Jun 2012 by Bugeyed


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful movie, shame about the quality, 4 Jun 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995] (DVD)
What was the point in repackaging this movie if the quality is worse and it's in the old TV format? I could see compression artefacts in the opening scenes and gave up watching. My original Australian release is better quality and in widescreen. It does not do justice to the movie in quality either but is better than this.
This is the best version of "Persuasion" and it deserves a restoration and Blu-ray release. I like the newer BBC version but much prefer this one. Amanda Root and Ciarán Hinds are great leads. Corin Redgrave is a wonderfully-ridiculous, but sometimes nasty father. Susan Fleetwood is fabulous as Lady Russel, her last screen role. I don't think there is a bad performance in it and it has a real feel with mud on clothes and people shown relaxing as well as in formal situations.
This film deserves so much better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars wont you stay...this is a very beautiful love song, 23 May 2012
This review is from: Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995] (DVD)
At last an adaptation of Austen that has not been turned into a chickflic. Persuasion is the most thoughtful of the novels, Austen at her most skilful and profound, so it is delightful that it has been adapted with similar confidence and subtlety. Our heroine is not a starlet but a young woman drained by disappointment and in this adaptation she really does gain radiance as her hope is rekindled.

The portrayal of her father must get the prize for best dimwit aristocrat ever, a real underplayed gem of a performance. In fact all the characters are charmingly themselves, adorable Charles, the daffy sisters, their loving bemused parents such an amiable contrast to Anne's own family. Social levels reflected in costume and language and values, from the impoverished navy family through the county up to the Vicountess (she is a Vi-count-ess!)are spot on. Lovely. Enjoy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fantastic, 19 Feb 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995] (DVD)
My favourite Jane Austin book and adaptation. Simply sublime. Much better than the ITV adaptation even though that one had Rupert Penry Jones.

This is the Ciaran Hinds/Amanda Root one and has to be the best ever.

Please try it. You'll not regret it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars best interpretion of Persuasion on film, 19 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995] (DVD)
I love this DVD. The film is close to the book and very realistic to the period. I particularly like the use of natural light, even during the evenings when only candles were available. The awkwardness of various social settings is Jane Austen's real gift and this is beautifully acted. We can clearly sense the main characters' thoughts and motivations through the machinations of the plot. Highly recommended for a sensitive, intelligent take on Jane Austen's most mature novel.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best adaptation, 14 Feb 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995] (DVD)
This is a restrained production, but is the closest adaptation and is faithful to the original book (which is a particular favourite of mine). Acting by a beautifully cast group is well balanced and well paced and the script races along- a really great treat to curl up on a wet Sunday afternoon with!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intelligent and beautiful, 23 July 2013
This review is from: Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995] (DVD)
`God bless the Squire and his relations
And keep us in our proper stations'.

Jane Austen would never have prayed like that, at least once she was grown up. She knew that money made a difference (she wrote for money) and she had seen society change. Her last novel, in its very slim way, is her Middlemarch. She once described her work as a miniature on `two inches of ivory' but her canvas in Persuasion (to mingle artistic and nautical metaphor) is spread wide.

Everybody is on the up or down. Sir Walter Elliot, whelmed in debt, is renting a town-house and pretending that he is still important - while his lawyer's daughter is eyeing him up as suddenly more accessible. Squire Musgrave, whose spare cash has been husbanded for generations, has educated his daughters into fancier ideas than their ancestors ever had - and his son, for better or worse, has managed to marry an Elliot. Sir Walter's heir, once barred from Kellynch Hall for marrying a woman who smelled of the shop, becomes company again, once he is a widower with the money.

Meanwhile Admiral Croft, son of nobody in particular, blows in with his lifetime's-worth of prizes and takes the lease on Kellynch Hall, furniture and all. His brother-in-law, Captain Wentworth, who wasn't fit to marry an Elliot girl eight years ago, is now to be courted himself - he has prize money too.

There are people at the bottom of the snakes. Captain Harville - as good a man as Wentworth - has nothing but a bad leg, a cramped lodging and children to rear. In Bath disabled Mrs Smith is counting pennies and selling knitting to pay her nurse. Her late husband was preyed on by a crooked friend.

And Anne, who, only eight years ago, trusted her godmother's counsel enough to refuse her penniless lover, has grown clear-eyed in maturity and regret. Now she can see that her old friend is a dinosaur - but she herself, at twenty-seven, is a left-behind female too. To the Elliots she is an embarrassment, not worth a place at table. To the Musgraves she is a nice maiden aunt, piano player and peacemaker. Her rejected lover, when he turns up again, says he wouldn't have known her.

Everything in the book is told from Anne's point of view. But nearly all its events happen where she is not. Anne rarely speaks, and hardly at all with Wentworth. The great scene in which she at last makes her feelings clear is almost at the end - and she is not talking to the man she loves. Not an easy book to dramatise without coarsening it. When the screenwriter puts a bit of Austen's sarky narration into the mouth of a suitable character (`I shouldn't think Mother ever called 'em anything in her life!') it works very well. When we see the little boys, in the background of a scene, learning to get seasick on the Admiral's knee, that is good too. It reminds us that the Navy was schooling young boys at the same time as it was crippling Harvilles, and fills in for so much of the Admiral's kindly, blunt talk that had to be left out (`There is old Sir Archibald Drew and his grandson. Ah! The peace has come too soon for that younker!') But some of the invented confrontations (OK, you can't have a drama without a bit of drama) ring a false note. Mr Elliot's proposal and Anne's putdown have been praised as Austenesque by other reviewers, but I felt it to be out of character for the latter.

What we do get is a satisfying feel of the times: the darkness of candlelit rooms, the dirt on the hems of those white-drab coats that can be brushed but never washed. Austen tells us about country mud - muddy lanes in Sense & Sensibility, mud on the bottom of Eliza's skirt in Pride and Prejudice - but adaptations generally keep it clean.

And unusually for a film (films are so often good-looking but cloth-eared) we get an idea of the life of the men. After all, it is only the men who are allowed to have a life, as Anne eventually reminds Harville. We get it from their voices. The Naval men, who have to bellow across a deck in a storm, are louder than the Musgrave men, who only need to shout across a field. When I was a little girl visiting my grandma half a century ago I used to feel blasted against the wall when the men came in from outside and had an amiable full-decibel conversation in her ten-foot cottage sitting-room. So I warmed to Ciaran Hinds' Wentworth, telling the whole table and the rest of the county about his early life in the Navy, leaving the company on a laugh and lounging out, presumably for a pee. Later we meet young Mr Elliot the Kellynch heir, who can modulate his murmurs so subtly that he can make hostile remarks about a woman who is in the same room - or drop compliments into a woman's ear at a concert. How did it come about that the popular idea of the Austen romantic hero is a drawing-room smoothie? Openness, or the want of it, is a quality Jane Austen wrote and cared about.

The smaller parts are nearly all wonderfully cast and directed. See rosy-nosed Charles (Simon Beale), sharing a tired sofa-moment with the woman he once hoped to marry (and skimming stones into the sea with the solemn pleasure of a child, a Rowlandson cartoon come to life). And Mrs Admiral Croft (Fiona Shaw - such an authoritative, thoughtful actress for such a few lines) showing Anne the life she could have had with a few remarks at a dinner table. This is the same dinner table where Wentworth is amusing two pretty girls about his early career and betrays himself into a clear moment of anger and hurt: ten stars for the screenplay which distils the book so well here. I quite like the way that two Irish actors have been chosen to play brother and sister without overegging it: Wentworth is a plausibly Anglo-Irish name.

Sophie Thompson doesn't make a grotesque out of exasperating Mary, and she has the portrait-looks that would have persuaded simple Charles that he might do very well with her if he couldn't have Anne. Robert Glenister's Captain Harville has the authentic, held-in anger of a superior man down on his luck. It's an uncomfortable performance that made me think of the young man in Ford Madox Brown's `The Last of England'.

Which brings me to Sir Walter and Miss Elliot, the only disappointments. Neither is classically handsome, though personal beauty is all in all to Sir Walter. Poor Miss Elliot: she is the eldest but not a son. She will die poor, relying on her sisters' charity. She should have been played by a beautiful automaton who speaks and moves like a gentlewoman. This Miss Elliot is Cockney and sprawls about with chocolates.

It could also be said that Anne is miscast. Anne should be pretty: according to the book, `an elegant little woman'. But how can you cast a pretty actress in her late twenties, in charming costume, and hope to show how such a creature would be no longer wanted in the early 19th Century gene pool? So Amanda Root's Anne begins with dull hair, clothes that half-fit and don't flatter, and bleak lighting. We are shown her sense of duty, her kind common sense, and we feel sorry for her. But gradually we come to know that there is also a cultured mind, a real intelligence, compassion and - in the end - passion. I am referring, of course, to that conversation with bitter Harville near the end of the book. We didn't need the kiss and the clowns.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good adaptation, 21 Oct 2012
By 
SSmith (Milton Keynes) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995] (DVD)
I enjoyed this adaptation of my second favourite Jane Austen novel. I've read the book several times and this is pretty true to it. The acting and sets, costumes, etc. are all superb and it's well worth watching. The more recent version (2007 I believe) has a little more chemistry between Anne and Wentworth, but this one is definitely more 'real' and 'true' to the book. Well worth watching.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an excellent Austen adaptation, 1 Aug 2013
By 
Stanley Crowe (Greenville, SC) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995] (DVD)
Jane Austen's shortest novel is perhaps the most easily adapted to feature film length -- the others do better as serializations -- and this version is superb. Amanda Root as Anne Elliott starts as a sad and slightly depressed young woman who nevertheless always treats everybody well -- better than some deserve, in fact -- but who, when she gets a chance at happiness (after Louisa Musgrove falls in love with Captain Benwick) becomes positive and quietly active in her efforts to recapture the affections of her old love, Captain Wentworth. Ciaran Hinds is an ideal Wentworth, a naval man whose years at sea have rubbed some social polish from him but whose basically attractive directness and good-heartedness have survived. Corin Redgrave is the narcissistic Sir Walter, Anne's snobbish and fiscally irresponsible father, Sophie Thompson is perfect as Anne's limp sister Mary (who has married Charles Musgrove [Simon Russell Beale], who once courted Anne), and Susan Fleetwood (Lady Russell), Fiona Shaw and John Woodvine (as the Crofts, Sir Walter's tenants and Wentworth's sister and brother-in-law) are English theater stalwarts in relatively minor roles, though important to the plot. Sam West is the handsome but manipulative heir to the Elliott estate whom Wentworth thinks of, mistakenly, as a temptation for Anne. The attention to the interiors (that mark social and economic standing) and costume is exemplary, and remarkably little that is important to the book is changed -- one might complain that Anne's elder sister, Elizabeth, a great beauty in the book, is not pretty enough here, and Mrs Clay, who is angling after the widowed Sir Walter, is also insufficiently attractive, when one remembers that good looks matter to Sir Walter almost more than anything. And Anne's friend Mrs Smith comes across as more of an airhead than the chastened invalid of the novel. Anne's final appearance on the deck of Wentworth's ship is maybe a step too far, and their very public kiss at Bath would not have happened as it did in 1814. But these minor quibbles don't diminish the achievement here -- the level of acting is very high and the film's handling of the romantic resolution is satisfying in the way the book's is.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Persuation, 2 Feb 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995] (DVD)
Awesome Austin does it again Persuation reminds me of Bath , and the same buildings are in use today,we just dress differently.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars price quality very good, 25 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995] (DVD)
I was searching for a good TV-adaptation and this one was the best I found. Although it only contains English subtitles and no menu, this is a good buy. Amanda Root embodies Anne Elliot in a convincing way, but I missed a glance of Anne's rebellious character that is clearly prominent in the book. A good price for a good tv-adaptation.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995]
Persuasion (Repackaged) [DVD] [1995] by Roger Michell (DVD - 2012)
4.50
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews