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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved it!! 5 stars all the way!
I have to side with all the five-star reviewers!

I enjoyed reading this SO much! I thought that the characters, who we have learnt to love in the previous books, developed new layers to their personality - Peeta in particular! A lot of other reviews have suggested that Katniss is unlikable and that she becomes weak and 'whiney', but I found her one of the most...
Published on 29 Nov. 2011 by Lulu

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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Limping to the finish line
SPOILERS

At the end of the second book, Katniss and co. have relocated to the rebel city of District 13, the city that the Capitol maintained was destroyed. From here, the characters plot their attack against the hated Capitol and President Snow, joining in the rebellion that's now taking place in all of the Districts, for a showdown between President Snow and...
Published on 21 April 2012 by Sam Quixote


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What has happened here ?, 7 July 2014
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I greatly enjoyed the first two books. Not the most original idea or piece of writing, but all in all very enjoyable, well plotted and written. Not sure though what has happened with the third and final book, its as if there were no editors and the whole book was rushed to the market. Its overplotted, violent, nonsence and just painful to read through. On top of it its quite predictable, I guessed half through the book what would happen at the end. I am from a former communist country, i.e. I lived through a dictatorship when I was a kid, and I find some of the ideas on the dictatorship in this third book plain ridiculous. I know, authors are totally entitled to create their fiction as they like, but for me it simply did not fly. I hope the movie makers do a lot of heavy editing, else the movies would be a flop imho.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars weird, 22 Oct. 2013
Have to agree with everyone else in this section - although we seem to be in a minority. The first book was very good and I was interested to see where it would go. The second one was frankly a bit dodgy, a pale imitation of the first book with far too much emphasis on clothes, makeup etc.(which I'd only just about tolerated in the first book). The last book was quite honestly bizarre. There was a bloody great revolution going on and what did we hear about? More clothes, more makeup, what lines she said for the camera...who the hell cares? I know propanganda is important in modern-day warfare, but it's hardly centre stage. She was supposed to be a strong confident woman blah blah blah. Strong confident women don't twitter on about clothes and makeup. They're involved in real action. Very disappointing.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor conclusion to the trilogy, 25 Aug. 2012
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Just to warn you, there will be a few spoilers in this review.

Mockingjay, sadly, is a poor conclusion to the trilogy that makes little sense and for the most part feels disjointed. As another reviewer mentioned, it felt like reading a fanfiction. I found myself (although I hate to admit it) skimming over parts which mostly consisted of Katniss' self pitying internal monologues. She is nothing like the character in the first novel - don't expect any emotional scenes like Katniss taking Prim's place in the Games or Rue dying in Katniss' arms because there are none in Mockingjay. Katniss becomes a truely unlikeable character; in Mockingjay Collins has stripped her of her independence and logical thinking, leaving behind a Mary Sue (or Bella Swan) type of character. Her defiance in Hunger Games was admirable, whereas in Mockingjay it is just frustrating and generally a stupid idea.

Another enfuriating part of the novel is the love triangle, which has been painful to read throughout the entire series but it spectacularly agonising in Mockingjay. Katniss becomes such an unlikeable character that I began to detest Peeta and Gale for even caring about her and for allowing her to treat them in such a way. When the love triangle is finally concluded in Mockingjay it is done so in a couple of brisk, unfeeling sentences that were obviously written without any care or effort. If you were a fan of the love triangle, you'll be disappointed with its lackluster ending after three novels.

Mockingjay had potential with Collins killing off several of its main characters including Finnick, who in my opinion was one of the only likeable characters left. I thought that there would have been more of a reaction by Katniss to his death, but the novel quickly moved on, which felt wrong considering Collins put some effort into describing Finnick's reunion with Annie, as well as their wedding. The worst death was that of Prim, however, which felt entirely unnecessary. It may have worked if Katniss had reacted to it as you would have expected, but instead the next chapter revolves around Katniss wallowing in self pity from her own injuries, with Prim's death not being mentioned for several pages afterwards. I don't understand why Prim was killed off. From Katniss' lack of reaction to it (aside from at the very end of the novel) you would have thought Prim was just some insignificant secondary character. At least in Mockingjay Collins builds Prim's character a little, but ultimately when she was killed I found myself showing little interest, something which could have been redeemed if Collins had put more effort into the scene.

My recommendation is for people to stop reading at Hunger Games, or at Catching Fire if you have already read that. Mockingjay is a dull read. As soon as you think an action scene is going to get started, Mary Sue-Katniss gets herself injured in some way and usually passes out. The ending to Mockingjay leaves a bad taste in your mouth and fails to stir any sort of emotion in you other than regret that you didn't just stop reading the series at Hunger Games.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Lacks intensity and page turning suspense of 1 and 2, but all's well end's well, 4 Oct. 2014
Well, number three in The Hunger Games trilogy, and 17 year old Katniss Everdeen is out there fighting for her life...again. Surprised that girl does not have grey hairs strewn through that beautiful blonde braid. Plus the ever present Peeta and Gale - who to trust, who not to trust. Certainly gives a different perspective on the life of a teenage girl than those reading these books could ever lead. And yet despite her toughness and outstanding attributes as a hunter and master of weapons, her unwanted destiny as leader and figurehead, she still manages to retain the angst and anguish of being a teenage girl, especially with regards to boys. Is this the real secret of the amazing success of these three stories? That beneath the horrific plot lines, sickening themes and all round ghastliness of it all, there lurks a normal teenage soul, that makes her so relateable to her audience?

And yet, something has been lost in this last chapter in Katniss's fight against the Capitol and President Snow. Yes, it has a gripping plot line, full of surprises and the unexpected. Characters we have grown to love and admire die - violently. In fact I don't think one single person dies a peaceful death in the whole series of books. Where would be the fun in that. but as a whole this book lacks the page turning intensity and frightening suspense that was on every page of The Hunger Games, and almost every page of Catching Fire. There are many pages in this last book where nothing happens, and it actually got just a little boring. When Katniss was in fighting/survival mode, it was marvellous stuff, but the reader has to read a lot of pages before the Katniss we know and love asserts herself.

Taking up right where Catching Fire finishes, Katniss, unsurprisingly, is a bit of a mess, with her home destroyed and her life upside down. She doesn't know who or what she is. In common with many 16/17 year old girls and boys. Maybe it is because she is now nothing more than a pawn or a tool in the war between the rebels and the Capitol that it seems like this. She is continually torn between Gale and Peeta, her mother and sister don't seem to need her as much, her best relationship seems to be with her sister's cat Butterscotch. She doesn't seem to like anyone else, nor they her.

Still as expected the Good Guys win, the Bad Guys don't, and there is some Happy Ever After. It is a good story, but somehow to me, it just all seems a bit tired. Hope the movie is better.....
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Real let down after the first two. Don't bother., 8 Oct. 2012
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I loved the first Hunger Games book. Liked the second. Hated the third. Probably hated it all the more because it is such a let down after the first two. There was so much potential to wrap the story up well and make a really dramatic statement, but this book is just filled with complex, interminable and pointlessly detailed battle scenes, and Katniss having a completely uncharacteristic breakdown. If you have read the first two, don't bother with this one, it'll ruin it all for you. I'm feeling quite bitter about that.

I think the problem is that Ms. Collins was rushed. As a writer myself, I know about deadlines, and I think that with the first two books selling like the new Twilight, she was put under too much pressure to get book 3 out as quickly as possible. It shows in that some of the writing really is quite juvenile and unpolished. I felt a bit like a teacher saying to her "I KNOW you can do better than this." I really wish she'd told her agent, editor, publisher and readers where to get off and taken all the time she needed to make a really satisfying conclusion to the trilogy.

SPOILER ALERT: To save you having to buy and struggle through this book, I'm going to summarise what happens.

District 13 is alive and well and underground, and Katniss is taken there following the end of book 2 where her mother and Prim are living with the other survivors of District 12. It's ruled over by President Coin, who asks Katniss to be the symbolic mockingjay to unite the districts against the capital. Katniss does so, but starts to realise that Coin is just as corrupt and cruel as Snow and would be just as much a tyrant were she to gain his power. The Districts do all rebel, all-out war ensues with huge loss of life. During the battle Katniss sees a cloud of little parachute bombs kill a group of children, and then sees the unexploded bombs go off a few minutes later to kill the medics - including Prim - who have rushed in to help the survivors. Having heard this tactic discussed in District 13 she realises that this atrocity was committed by Coin, not the Capitol as Coin later claims.

When the Districts have won President Coin suggests reinstituting the Hunger Games - using the Capitol's children - as punishment for how they treated the Districts. Gale supports this idea (and Coin) but Katniss feels it makes them just as bad as the old regime. Still reeling from Prim's death, however, she agrees that the people responsible for killing her sister should suffer.

The execution of President Snow is staged and Katniss is to be the one to kill him since this was part of her terms for being the mockingjay. Instead, however, she shoots her arrow into Coin.

Snow dies from his mystery illness and Katniss goes into isolation in District 12 to have a completely uncharacteristic mental breakdown. Peeta is with her, since he too is messed up from torture by the Capitol. Twenty years later Katniss and Peeta are married with two little children and still living in the rebuilt District 12.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fade to black..., 27 Aug. 2010
By 
debbie8355 (Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
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Contains Minor Spoilers - Please do not read if spoilers annoy you.

This book gives a solid conclusion to the Hunger Games trilogy but it's not as outstanding as the first two books in the series. The last third of the book unravels into a rushed journey and I found the ending disappointing. Katniss is an unrecognisable wreck of a person in Mockingjay which I guess is the understandable fallout of the previous atrocities she's seen and suffered. Peeta is incapacitated and largely absent until the finale and Gale is torn down in much the same way he was built up to be a hero in the first book. In the end Katniss doesn't even have to choose between Peeta and Gale, events do that for her. Katniss has choices, which aren't really choices, such as to be the Mockingjay or not but is often sedated (very often) and removed from situations only to wake up later. Most of her early behaviour in the book is explained by concussion and her medical wrist band saying she is mentally incapacitated. She is manipulated by District 13 as much as she was by the Capitol. I would even go as far to say I didn't like Katniss in this book as she's too passive and has been broken rather than growing into a woman. She stands on her own two feet (when she's not being medicated) without support but she doesn't have a strong voice to match the role of being the figurehead of the rebellion against the Capitol. She is left rather high and dry without support. Her mother and Prim although being physically there are tied up with hospital duties. The lack of another constant strong character in this book makes this just the Katniss Show although there are some star cameos. Finnick almost steals the limelight but isn't developed enough to be quite the equal male foil to Katniss as Gale and Peeta were in previous books. Even Haymitch is rather muted in this book and I think Mockingjay suffers from not having a strong male voice in the story - that was one of the major strengths of the previous books.
Not to say this was a bad book - I came away from this book disappointed but just because the previous books set the bar at an incredibly high standard.
The plot wasn't particularly shocking. The ending fell flat as it had been flagged up long ago with the pyschological weapons side of things. There are no red herrings or surprises in this book.
If you are looking for something similar to read after the Hunger Games then I highly recommend looking at the Chaos Walking series by Patrick Ness.

ps this Hardcover 1st Edition (I got mine from amazon.com) has a mid blue fabric cover with a silver mockingjay shadow on the cover and silver writing down the spine. The slightly pearlised dustjacket has raised writing and the mockingjay is also slightly raised. A 3 star cover - you're not really missing anything special by just buying the paperback (which I also have).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars God I feel Awful now...... spoiler alert!, 14 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy Book 3) (Kindle Edition)
I find it strange that I have to give this book only 1 star, since in some ways I loved it. But.... the ending. I had so enjoyed the whole series and had read them one after another becoming almost totally immersed in the whole of Katniss' life when suddenly the whole world came screaming to a ghastly halt and we were left with a rather bitter middle aged lady sitting by herself and muttering.
It's as though a young girl so alive and exciting aged 16 has ended up at middle age sitting by a dirty canal drowning worms and dreaming of the young hope she once had. Then, she was loved both by a handsome dark haired dangerous beauty with whom she used to go poaching, and the rather plump slightly sweaty blond she has ended up with. She was the hope of her nation, the beacon in darkness, not a boring woman suffering from PTSD. She is now a woman who's last desperate act (shooting the new evil president) has not been hailed as heroism but forgiven on the grounds of mental illness! She tolerates the children she didn't really want because her baking obsessed husband wouldn't shut up until she agreed to have them, she doesn't even seem to know their names.
I think the idea was to make you feel the futility of war, but the writing just isn't up to putting across the gradual wearing away of optimism and the reversion to greed, prejudice and pettyness that always occurs. Unfortunately it left me rather feeling the futility of peace.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brutal and utterly relentless, 7 Jun. 2012
By 
"Mockingjay" is the final instalment of the Hunger Games trilogy and represents a far darker and bleaker view than the earlier two novels. Although ostensibly still aimed at the Young Adult market it's almost as if Suzanne Collins has decided that the story needs to grow up at a similar rate to her prospective readers. So you can consider yourself fully warned; don't expect a light hearted conclusion to the trilogy.

I have thoroughly enjoyed reading all three novels although I am far removed from the target demographic. I found Collins to be a master-storyteller (no gender-based puns intended or required) and remarkably even-handed, irrespective of whether it's a main character or a member of the minor supporting cast who is being killed off. The truth is that very few survive, but that will come as no surprise to readers familiar with the gritty realism that Collins employs.

I felt that her skill at characterisation improved considerably from the first book and I felt a real sense of identification with the problems and difficulties that the main characters experience. Katniss's descent into depression and lethargy is particularly well-written and heartbreakingly accurate.

For me the epilogue felt a little unnecessary and I wondered why Collins felt the need to write it. I must try to do some research on-line to see if anyone has asked her this question. I suppose that after the machinations of the fairly convoluted plot had played out perhaps she saw it as a simpler, cleaner ending. But to me the conclusion of the book felt somewhat rushed after such careful plotting to reach this point.

However to sum up this third and final novel is harsh, brutal, and utterly relentless.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars So disappointing, 4 Jun. 2014
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Samantha "Using audiobooks to make the commut... (Bury St Edmunds, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Watched the first two movies and just had to read the third book to see what happened.
I was SOOOOOO disappointed, the heroine turns out to be very lame and the ending is quite disappointing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Didnt grip me like the other 2, 13 Jun. 2012
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By the time I finished the second book (which I loved) I really didnt know how they were going to carry in into a third and if im honest I feel the third was a little unnessesary and I feel that they could have slightly extended the 2nd one rather than writing a third, I feel that this book was very slow in places, having said that I did read it in a few sittings and it wasnt awful but just not the best in my opinion.
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Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy Book 3)
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