Customer Reviews


5,246 Reviews
5 star:
 (3,903)
4 star:
 (823)
3 star:
 (318)
2 star:
 (126)
1 star:
 (76)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brutal and utterly relentless
"Mockingjay" is the final instalment of the Hunger Games trilogy and represents a far darker and bleaker view than the earlier two novels. Although ostensibly still aimed at the Young Adult market it's almost as if Suzanne Collins has decided that the story needs to grow up at a similar rate to her prospective readers. So you can consider yourself fully warned; don't...
Published on 7 Jun 2012 by Ian Kirkpatrick

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Mocking us all...
There are parts of this novel that are redeemable and deserve credit. The action sequence (once it finally gets going) is ok and it makes you want to find out what happens. However, there are so many other holes in the plot and characterisation that completely outweigh any kind of merit.

1) Katniss Everdeen has to be the worst protagonist I have come across...
Published 26 days ago by C. S. Bancroft


Most Helpful First | Newest First

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor conclusion to the trilogy, 25 Aug 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Just to warn you, there will be a few spoilers in this review.

Mockingjay, sadly, is a poor conclusion to the trilogy that makes little sense and for the most part feels disjointed. As another reviewer mentioned, it felt like reading a fanfiction. I found myself (although I hate to admit it) skimming over parts which mostly consisted of Katniss' self pitying internal monologues. She is nothing like the character in the first novel - don't expect any emotional scenes like Katniss taking Prim's place in the Games or Rue dying in Katniss' arms because there are none in Mockingjay. Katniss becomes a truely unlikeable character; in Mockingjay Collins has stripped her of her independence and logical thinking, leaving behind a Mary Sue (or Bella Swan) type of character. Her defiance in Hunger Games was admirable, whereas in Mockingjay it is just frustrating and generally a stupid idea.

Another enfuriating part of the novel is the love triangle, which has been painful to read throughout the entire series but it spectacularly agonising in Mockingjay. Katniss becomes such an unlikeable character that I began to detest Peeta and Gale for even caring about her and for allowing her to treat them in such a way. When the love triangle is finally concluded in Mockingjay it is done so in a couple of brisk, unfeeling sentences that were obviously written without any care or effort. If you were a fan of the love triangle, you'll be disappointed with its lackluster ending after three novels.

Mockingjay had potential with Collins killing off several of its main characters including Finnick, who in my opinion was one of the only likeable characters left. I thought that there would have been more of a reaction by Katniss to his death, but the novel quickly moved on, which felt wrong considering Collins put some effort into describing Finnick's reunion with Annie, as well as their wedding. The worst death was that of Prim, however, which felt entirely unnecessary. It may have worked if Katniss had reacted to it as you would have expected, but instead the next chapter revolves around Katniss wallowing in self pity from her own injuries, with Prim's death not being mentioned for several pages afterwards. I don't understand why Prim was killed off. From Katniss' lack of reaction to it (aside from at the very end of the novel) you would have thought Prim was just some insignificant secondary character. At least in Mockingjay Collins builds Prim's character a little, but ultimately when she was killed I found myself showing little interest, something which could have been redeemed if Collins had put more effort into the scene.

My recommendation is for people to stop reading at Hunger Games, or at Catching Fire if you have already read that. Mockingjay is a dull read. As soon as you think an action scene is going to get started, Mary Sue-Katniss gets herself injured in some way and usually passes out. The ending to Mockingjay leaves a bad taste in your mouth and fails to stir any sort of emotion in you other than regret that you didn't just stop reading the series at Hunger Games.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


65 of 75 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Still entertaining, but not as good as the first book., 19 May 2011
By 
A. Whitehead "Werthead" (Colchester, Essex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Having survived the Hunger Games, Katniss Everdeen is back home in Sector 12, not looking forward to her role as a mentor for the next year's games. She is surprised to hear rumours that her defiance of the Capitol and President Snow during the Games has sparked unrest and even discord in other sectors. When she and her co-winner, Peeta, conduct a tour of the districts, Katniss realises that her name and her emblem, the mockingjay, are being taken up as a symbol of rebellion and hope.

Determined to crush Katniss's influence, Snow arranges a special new Hunger Games event for the 75th anniversary of the games. All the living winners of the games must return to the arena for a fresh battle...

Catching Fire is the second volume of The Hunger Games Trilogy, Suzanne Collins' highly successful, post-apocalypse, dystopian YA SF series. Collins never intended to write a trilogy, so Catching Fire has some work to do to set up a bigger storyline that will be resolved in the following novel, namely the move from merely being a story set in a dystopia to a more epic story about the overthrow of the oppressive government.

For these reasons Catching Fire has some issues. We're more than halfway through the novel before the second Hunger Games kick off, and we're not able to spend much time with those games before the conclusion arrives. This is a shame as Collins addresses some of the weaknesses of the first set of games, with many more contestants being identified and much better-characterised than first time around. The arena is also far more ingenious, with many more deadly traps. The games section of the novel and the conclusion are both rushed in an attempt to cover as much ground as possible before the final novel, which hurts the quality of this book.

That said, it's still a fast-paced, readable and enjoyable book. We see more of Panem and get more of a sense what life is like for people living there, which is essential to better-establish the wider backdrop of the series. On the characterisation front, Katniss isn't always a sympathetic protagonist and often makes mistakes, which makes her more relatable and real. Other characters, like Peeta and newcomers like Finnick, are also given some solid scenes and character-building moments. The mutual hatred and anger between Katniss and President Snow is also well-handled. However, the Capitol and its rulers are rather dense in this book. Everything they do seems designed to inflame the situation and further the rebellion, which is weird for people who've been in charge for a century and have used the Hunger Games as a form of propaganda and control for seventy-five years, which requires some savvy knowledge of media and PR. Instead, the plot feels set-up ahead of time and both the reader and the characters are along for the ride.

Catching Fire (***) is a drop down in quality from The Hunger Games, but still an enjoyable and entertaining novel. It is available now in the UK and USA.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Darker than the original with a hell lot of plot twists..., 1 Aug 2011
By 
Mr. S. Merrill "Jonathan Merrill" (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The sequel to the brilliant Hunger Games once more begins in district 12, a town torn apart by poverty, forever in fear of its rulers, The Capitol. After surviving The Hunger games, Katniss and Peeta live a life of luxury and wealth in glorious mansions, no longer afraid of starvation. But do not be lulled into the lie that this is a happy ending, no, Katniss must live a life of deception, convincing The Capitol that she is madly in love with Peeta when she infact has feelings for her life -long friend Gale or shall face the consequences which are frigteningly clear: She and all she loves shall die. In the first novel, you are reasured that none of her family will come to any harm and that the only ones in any signicant danger are Katniss and Peeta. There are no such reasurances in this novel, so in one respect this is a scarier novel than The Hunger Games.
In terms of structure, this is quite a different beast to The Hunger Games, for instance while in the first novel most time is spent on Katniss preparing for the games and the actual event, focussing on the tributes tactics including her own and the events within the games. Giving you only a brief introduction to District 12 itself. Catching Fire focuses on the events outside the arena and the possiblities of revolution. The actual games are a little rushed. There is far less blood letting in Catching Fire but do not be tempted into the notion that because there is less violence the book is in any way lighter than The Hunger Games, as with most trilogies, the books only get darker and this is a very unpredictable and unsettleing read. There are truck loads of suspense and you cannot stop asking yourself centillions of questions surrounding President Snow and his ruthless, uncaring government. I prefer The Hunger Games only by half an inch because it is a little more satisfying and reveals this cruelly imaginative world for the very first time. If I don't start reading Mocking Jay anytime soon I think my head might explode.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What has happened here ?, 7 July 2014
By 
I greatly enjoyed the first two books. Not the most original idea or piece of writing, but all in all very enjoyable, well plotted and written. Not sure though what has happened with the third and final book, its as if there were no editors and the whole book was rushed to the market. Its overplotted, violent, nonsence and just painful to read through. On top of it its quite predictable, I guessed half through the book what would happen at the end. I am from a former communist country, i.e. I lived through a dictatorship when I was a kid, and I find some of the ideas on the dictatorship in this third book plain ridiculous. I know, authors are totally entitled to create their fiction as they like, but for me it simply did not fly. I hope the movie makers do a lot of heavy editing, else the movies would be a flop imho.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read, 19 Jun 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Loved this trilogy, couldn't put them down. Such an easy read. And not a vampire in sight. Very imaginative story line.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than either of the first two books, 16 Jun 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This the third book in the series, in my opinion, is a cracking read, much better than the first two books, more human in many ways and will make an excellent third film if the film company can get anywhere near to replicating what I read here.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Read, 16 Jun 2014
By 
C. J. Thomas (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I had to read this book having read the first two in the series. It has a twist at the end that I did not see coming which was refreshing.
I recommend you read the books in order as they follow on from each other.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow, disappointed :(, 15 Jun 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I raced through the first two books. Loved them both. Very disappointed by how long this book took to get to the point and the ending was disapointing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enthralling from start to finish, 18 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Catching Fire (Hunger Games Trilogy) (Kindle Edition)
another brilliantly written tale. downloaded book 3 without hesitation, can't wait for the next instalment.Katnis is a believabley true heroine.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars love it!!!, 5 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Catching Fire (Kindle Edition)
Absolutely loved this book it was un- putdownable!!! glad I have the next one ready to read!! hope its as good..
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Catching Fire (Hunger Games Trilogy)
3.32
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews