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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice Book
When you compose a book like this you're going to recieve some backlash from joe public, it's innevitable. Yes some of my favourite games are missing, yes i'm slightly disappointed, no i'm certainly not angry. If you grew up during those heady days of SNES vs Mega-Drive (Genesis) madness then this will be right up your alley, trust me when I say they didn't miss much. One...
Published on 6 Oct 2012 by Mr Ogden

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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Shoe-Size Short of its Potential
Those looking for a successor to Edge Magazine's fantastic "100 Best Games to Play Today" from their 200th issue will be sorely disappointed. Whilst you're certainly getting your money's worth with a book so large so as to require two firm hands on it at all times, its quality is all over the place, and many of is inclusions - questionable.

Though many of the...
Published on 2 Nov 2010 by Jon Porter


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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Shoe-Size Short of its Potential, 2 Nov 2010
Those looking for a successor to Edge Magazine's fantastic "100 Best Games to Play Today" from their 200th issue will be sorely disappointed. Whilst you're certainly getting your money's worth with a book so large so as to require two firm hands on it at all times, its quality is all over the place, and many of is inclusions - questionable.

Though many of the game descriptions take up a good half page, the prose of those that I've delved into is a tad wooden and spends far too much time outlining each game's plot and mechanics rather than justifying its inclusion in the book. You're left with an encyclopedia of sorts, one that'll certainly tell you what to expect when you pop Advanced Warfighter into your 360, but one that doesn't spend enough time telling you why you'd want to do it in the first place.

Tony Mott edits a magazine widely regarded to be the best in the business, but the decision to take a wide range of contributors from other magazines leads to varying degrees of quality within the book. The lack of a single voice is harmful in other ways too, with some passages that undermine the inclusion of other games. There's a slight sense here that the editorial team struggled to find 1001 quality inclusions, but then I sincerely doubt I'd be able to do much better.

Anyone looking for an encyclopedia of some of the greatest games ever made could do a lot worse than this book. Having said that, if you can find a back issue of Edge 200, its superior inclusions and more eloquent brevity might be a better place to start.
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48 of 55 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Severly misguided attemt..., 21 Oct 2010
I'll just get straight to the point. The editors of the book have failed completely in the balancing of their selection of games for the book.

I'll give some examples:

1. According to the book there are 10 games worth playing from the entire 70's, yet there are 106 games from 2009. Yes, I'm not kidding, 106. In fact, the 70's, 80's and 90's make up half the book, with he 00's taking up the second half. It's almost unbelievable how skewed the book is in this sense. The entries for the last few years read more as a list of every game published in that year, rather than a list of recommendations. Even games that were met with mixed reviews at best are included. I smell kickbacks. In fact I kinda hope they were involved, because someone settling on this list without them is just too sad to be true.

2. Less importantly, but still an issue is a sometimes extreme bias towards certain genres. Most noticeably, there is an over-abundance of SCHMUPS and great lack of insight into the development of the graphic adventure genre. For some reason they've listed every single LucasArts adventure game, while listing nearly none of the competition, leaving a severely unbalanced picture. After all, this is supposed to be 1001 games you must play before you die, right? Not the 1001 best games every made. Because if it's the latter, then I guess the book is fine, but for the former I find it completely fails to give an appropriate overview of the development of the genres.

Before you buy it, at least keep in mind what kind of book you're getting. It reads more like an advertisement for recent games than any serious attempt to collate a list of games you must or should play. I had it on pre order from the day I heard about it, and I can tell you without dropping a beat, I would not have bought it had I know the direction they've taken the book in, which is a great shame because 1001 albums, books and movies are all great book. This one, however, is not.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice Book, 6 Oct 2012
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When you compose a book like this you're going to recieve some backlash from joe public, it's innevitable. Yes some of my favourite games are missing, yes i'm slightly disappointed, no i'm certainly not angry. If you grew up during those heady days of SNES vs Mega-Drive (Genesis) madness then this will be right up your alley, trust me when I say they didn't miss much. One thing I do have to agree with is the author/publisher seems to think that the people reading this have never played ANY of these games so must feel obligated to fill you in on every games backstory, instead of giving you important info like game mechanics, level designs etc. It's only a slight niggle though and should'nt detract from your enjoyment of this trip down memory lane (early 70's - 2010) And they included Demons Souls!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must have for all video game fanatics, 16 Feb 2013
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Gamers of all ages will enjoy this book, as it covers games from the very birth of consoles through to the current day.

The Author is a legend in his own right, and this awesome book can either be read from cover to cover, or you can simply flick through and read about the games you are interested in.

Very cool item this!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Video Games, 1 Feb 2013
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J. Kavanagh - See all my reviews
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I bought this book for my son in law, he absolutely over the moon, this is a definitive book for Video games maniacs...
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile purchase despite potential controversy!, 3 Jan 2011
By 
N. Blake (Nottingham, UK) - See all my reviews
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It's been eight years since the brilliant 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die came out, with its unbiased and enthusiastic selection not judging or rating its films, but reading more as a history of cinema, and an attempt to expand your knowledge and viewing habits.

Despite some clunkers in the series (the 1001 Books book fails to work, being too biased towards late twentieth century fiction, badly organised by birth date of author rather than publication of book, and its reviews being too short and pithy to get to the heart of why you should read each novel), 1001 Video Games is thankfully a more impressive entry.

Sure, there are problems with it. Sure, it does seem very weighted towards more recent games, but that may simply be because it takes some time to work out what will become a classic, whilst acknowledging that you want to include recent favourites to get potential readers on-side. The original edition of 1001 Films includes musical Chicago as its final selection, a bizarre choice, yet understandably deleted by the time the second edition came out!

And yeah, as with any of this series, there's going to be a few games here you disagree with being included, or - more annoyingly - wonder why they're NOT included. ("Ico" seems a very bizarre title to be omitted considering it is praised at least twice within the rest of the book. And in my mind I would have loved to have seen "Riven: The Sequel to MYST" in there, considering there is no other adventure game which has ever gone to its lengths or detail, plus I would have died to see practically unknown yet highly sophisticated and detailed British adventure game "Azrael's Tear" included. That may just be me, however!)

But this is a huge tome, and although a casual flick through will highlight the more obvious choices, just like with 1001 Films, sitting down and having a more detailed look will show up more obscure games you may never have heard of, and yet which sound fascinating, exciting, and different. Tiny experimental indie games you can download for free nestle amongst the huge Nintendo console blockbusters, and each new delight makes you appreciate the level of research and detail which has gone into this impressive book.

Details which could be included to improve the title for a future edition would be to have another index listing the games by genre (as the Film 1001 book does), and a proper list of platforms each game is available on rather than just saying "various" if there's more than one. And yeah, a screenshot for EVERY title (rather than just most of them) would be fantastic.

Quirks aside, I love this book as a history of the development of video games, and also as a guide for enhancing my knowledge and interest in playing and appreciating titles I might have either previously ignored, or simply never heard of before.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Fails to do justice to the games included, 29 Jun 2014
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This review is from: 1001 Video Games: You Must Play Before You Die (Kindle Edition)
I bought this book in the hopes of finding more games to add to my list, and it certainly helped in that regard. There's over a hundred new games I'm looking forward to playing as a result of this book. However, the short essays included with each game entry very rarely do justice to the quality of the games. They fail to convincingly present a case as to why the game is considered worthy of being in the book in a compelling way. There is also a general inconsistency in the writing, a side effect of having so many contributors.
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3.0 out of 5 stars covers early days to present, 1 Feb 2014
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Ok, but a little hard to handle, being about A5 size but about 2 inches thick and heavy. Not enough coverage of the early years for me.
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3.0 out of 5 stars ok not good as described, 7 Dec 2013
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Book was ok but was ex library book and one page torn out. Readable copy but not good as described
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4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent stab at a tricky task, 21 Aug 2013
By 
D. Kelly (Belfast, N.Ireland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: 1001 Video Games: You Must Play Before You Die (Kindle Edition)
This book is very well done - I was pleased to see my favourites included (particularly those that may not have been as popular as others) and the standard of writing while a bit piecemeal is overall very good. I guess it is aimed at quite a wide audience - from an old retro head like me - right through to a modern gamer. It would be a good purchase for modern gamers who may have an interest in earlier works which sadly aren't always easy to get to play because of the immaturity of the publishing model for games. (Imagine not being able to listen to Sgt, Pepper on your latest hifi system or watch La Strada on your new Bluray player).

The only issue I have with it is that not all of the games have a screenshot which I think is quite a bad oversight. These are video games after all - seeing what a game looks like is quite important. Just a pity the publisher couldn't justify the extra cost of making sure all entries got a screeshot. Overall though - well worth a look. A great book to dip into and the fact that the games are arranged in chronological order will help out younger gamers locate older stuff.
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