Customer Reviews


11 Reviews
5 star:
 (9)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most hated album in Jazz?
Upon release this album was reviled, despised and generally detested. Miles Davis who gifted the world with the definitive jazz album 'Kind of Blue' and, instead of resting on critical accolades and commercial success had carried on creating, exploring psychedelic 'acid' rock (the underrated 'Miles in the Sky') blues-rock (The proto-fusion of 'Bitches Brew' or 'In a...
Published on 2 April 2010 by Weshimulo

versus
0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not Jazz As We Know It Jim
I'll keep my review brief. This is noisy, tuneless rubbish. Typical of Miles' early to mid seventies output. Don't bother with it.
Published 3 months ago by Mr. D. Wyatt


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most hated album in Jazz?, 2 April 2010
This review is from: On The Corner (Audio CD)
Upon release this album was reviled, despised and generally detested. Miles Davis who gifted the world with the definitive jazz album 'Kind of Blue' and, instead of resting on critical accolades and commercial success had carried on creating, exploring psychedelic 'acid' rock (the underrated 'Miles in the Sky') blues-rock (The proto-fusion of 'Bitches Brew' or 'In a Silent Way') and even playing his trumpet through a wah-wah peddle to create a Hendrix-inspired feedback effect on 'Live Evil'. THE Miles Davis had finally lost the plot, they speculated; "I love Miles, but this is where I get off" one reviewer grumbled. However, Miles' quest was motivated by art and the desire to create. That purity of vision resulted in the hypnotic, searing blast of sweaty, funky-soul that is 'On the corner' in some ways his most alternative record. Certainly one of his best.

Inspired by the likes of Jimi Hendrix, James Brown and Sly & The Family Stone (who were rocketing up the charts at the time), yet also perturbed at the way young black audiences had largely ignored jazz, Miles began crafting a record that gave these fans the type of music that was selling big and blowing minds, but gave it to them AS jazz, arguably in its original form. He was also about to step away from any significant critical or commercial success for many years, as the record was unfairly blasted by critics and purists. The accusations of 'selling out' mirror those hurled at Dylan circa 'Highway 61' and while that record catapulted its writer to even greater heights, On the Corner doomed Miles Davis for many years.

Interestingly, it wasn't jazz fans that dug this one up from the depths and resurrected it some 15 years or so after release. It was second wave punk bands, 90's Hip Hop DJs and alternative rockers who finally told the world all about this great album.

The album is extremely tightly played, and features much less of Miles' playing than one might expect. It sets about very early on creating a heavy, swirling groove which permeates the entire album and seems to surround you like a tornado of sound. It also utilizes the loud/quiet formula you will find in Sun Ra (Heliocentric world), King Crimson (Crimson King) or other Miles records of the period. It has its own heart beat that tumbles along, buoyed by sounds from seemingly ill-fitting instruments (Jingle bells???) jangly symbols and some exceptional blasts of rock n roll guitar. Very deep and murky, mysterious and otherworldly, alternative and challenging yet instantly familiar and interesting. A great experiment, a wonderful adventure to go on.

It just keeps going, a smorgasbord of sounds. A record that would predate the rise of alternative music by many, many years. Miles was simply further ahead of the curve than even he realized this time. Maybe it isn't strictly speaking a jazz record, but I'd stop before describing it as funk in the purest way or rock, or fusion, or soul...But its all in there, a cultural document with grooves saturated in prevalent thought of the time, civil rights, pan-Africanism (check the congo-ized percussion on 'Vote for Miles') politics (Mr. Freedom X) sex and free expression. While the other jazz players were sticking rigidly to formula and established patterns, Miles was reporting on the world of the time. Sticking his head out of the window, to hear the sound of the street, as he did his entire life.

This record deserves significant re-appraisal. You could start by buying it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another great mid 70's Miles Davis album, 18 Feb 2010
By 
Smitty Werbenjaegermanjensen (real name) (Thread rehab facility 37) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: On The Corner (Audio CD)
This is a stunning album. From the very first notes it is funky in a way that jazz had never been before.

The drums are metronomic and hypnotic, other instruments chop and play snatches of notes that fit into the spaces between. There is so much going on and yet there is a lot of repetition. It is the musical equivalent of watching a pot boil, but so much more rewarding, obviously, otherwise I'd be in the kitchen getting another pot on the cooker instead of listening to it as I write.

Miles is taking a huge risk here, the music could so easily have fallen flat and become boring, yet, thanks to the supreme skills of all involved it never does. It is a lesson in how to wring the most out of a single chord and how to keep the rhythm interesting without changing the basic beat. The level of improvising that was going on in concert around this time by his band was unique, unless you were in the rhythm section. How these guys could hold the beat for so long without cracking up is a feat of magnificence and self control in itself.

It must have been incredible when it came out almost 40 years ago. Unlike the theme for Shaft and other funky music this has not aged at all. It sounds as fresh and as interesting as anything that has been made in the last 2, 10, 20 years. Certainly I do not think Miles was ever as good as this after he came out of his "retirement" in the mid 70's, sure he could play, but had lost something he never got back.

One of my favourite Miles Davis albums.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars get down with it, 1 Oct 2010
By 
H. A. Lynch "the teacher" (Attleborough,Norfolk,UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: On The Corner (Audio CD)
If you get the chance, have a listen to the unedited master on disc one of the Complete Sessions box. OK, it isn't a spectacualrly good-value box, containing as it does far too much that is previously available,but this track gives you another angle on the long piece that starts the original album.

I have been using this album to give some of my students a way into jazz and it moves them in a way Kind of Blue or Bitches Brew may not have.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Miles runs the funk down., 17 Oct 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: On The Corner (Audio CD)
I am a big Miles fan. I think I probably own more albums and bootlegs by Miles than by anyone else. This one eluded me somehow for far too long. This is seriously funky, repetitive, urban, carnal grooving. The album sounds amazing, the production is truly astounding. I can't say I like it as much as 'In A Silent Way', but it's definitely up there with the best of Miles' output.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 23 July 2013
This review is from: On The Corner (Audio CD)
I was put off getting this album until quite late on in my Miles Davis collecting. The reason must be pretty clear to any who have read about his music in general and the critical reception of this album in particular. Bitches Brew may have alienated jazz critics like Stanley Crouch (see Miles Electric: A Different Kind Of Blue [DVD] [2004]) as his music has certainly not straight jazz by that time; more jazz/rock fusion with an emphasis on rock and jazz critics were simply not the people to be asking; they had no frame of reference to measure it against.

1970-71 saw Miles gathering a much bigger audience for his music, playing concert venues rather than jazz clubs. He had played the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival to 600'000 people (as featured in Miles Electric, mentioned above) but Miles was becoming concerned that he was losing his black audience. His response to that anxiety was On the Corner. If the jazz critics hated Bitches Brew, it seemed that everybody hated On the Corner. The cover sets it up, very 'Street' and aggressively so. The music is uncompromisingly rhythmic and dense. The soloing instruments are kept back amongst the pulsing rhythm and even to sympathetic ears it does, even today, sound a bit unrelenting on first listen.

Time, however, has been very forgiving to this album. The gradual catching up that various forms of popular music have done in the past 40 years (but not jazz) has meant that current audiences are far more receptive. I had gone through a learning process with Miles' music, which lead up to On the Corner, aided by Ian Carr's excellent Miles Davis: The Definitive Biography. Carr contends that despite Miles changing the genre setting of his music over his career, what de did as a player really was very much the same; he created a setting that he and his featured soloists could play against.

Here it was pretty clear that Miles was making statement; he was echoing that thing that Jack Johnson said "I'm black, they ain't never gonna let me forget it. I'm black alright, I ain't never gonna let them forget it." What Miles did here was to re-establish that he was not going to be tamed into the sort of black artist that white America could be comfortable with; he was going to do it on his own terms. Having said that this is also, for those willing to actually listen, a brilliant album, which I listen to again and again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Waste no time - hit that order button!, 11 April 2014
This review is from: On The Corner (Audio CD)
Sorry Amazon but even as a loyal customer I just had to buy this as it was on offer at HMV in Brighton for 1.99p!!! Put simply - it is wonderful from the very first notes and all the retro hype reviews of the "overlooked classic" variety are for once completely accurate. The use of 'unusual' (in jazz, that is) instruments are amazing - jingle bells and sitars (and the hand claps) in "Black Satin" for example. This hasn't left my CD player in 2 weeks since purchasing. Amazing. Don't waste any time - BUT IT NOW!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Second best Miles davis LP,, 5 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: On The Corner (Audio CD)
Amazing record 2 drummers 3 piano/synths ,funky psychedelic Jazz ,perfect getting baked music, i have no idea why most fans don`t like this LP.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Grooves like hell!, 3 Aug 2013
This review is from: On The Corner (Audio CD)
This album pounds you into the ground with many layers of rhythm, bass, harmony and melody grooving away intensely for almost the entire duration. It's probably safe to say that, if you don't like the first ten seconds of 'On The Corner', you won't stand much chance of liking the rest of the album!

It is clear that Miles Davis desired to move into funk territory with this album and, although not as straight forward as, say, Herbie Hancock's 'Head Hunters', the album is more accessible than many of Davis' fusion works. The playing is sharp and defined - all the things needed for jazz-funk, yet there is sometimes a tendency to sacrifice warmth for sheer mechanistic groove. This is perhaps why Davis failed to connected with the young black audience of the day as he intended to with this album.

I would say this album is more uplifting than Davis' classics 'Bitches' Brew', 'In A Silent Way', and 'Kind Of Blue' as it derives more from funk and pop than blues and jazz. For this reason, if you're in the mood for something to dance to rather than something to comfort you in your sorrows, I would take a chance on 'On the Corner'. It's powerful stuff and grooves like hell!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Miles Davies At His Best!, 7 Mar 2012
This review is from: On The Corner [VINYL] (Vinyl)
Miles Davies's purity of vision resulted in the hypnotic, searing blast of sweaty, funky-soul 'On the corner' in some ways his most alternative record. Certainly one of his best.

Inspired by the likes of Jimi Hendrix, James Brown and Sly & The Family Stone (who were rocketing up the charts at the time), yet also perturbed at the way young black audiences had largely ignored jazz, Miles began crafting a record that gave these fans the type of music that was selling big and blowing minds, but gave it to them AS jazz, arguably in its original form. He was also about to step away from any significant critical or commercial success for many years, as the record was unfairly blasted by critics and purists. The accusations of 'selling out' mirror those hurled at Dylan circa 'Highway 61' and while that record catapulted its writer to even greater heights, On the Corner doomed Miles Davis for many years.

Interestingly, it wasn't jazz fans that dug this one up from the depths and resurrected it some 15 years or so after release. It was second wave punk bands, 90's Hip Hop DJs and alternative rockers who finally told the world all about this great album.

The album is extremely tightly played, and features much less of Miles' playing than one might expect. It sets about very early on creating a heavy, swirling groove which permeates the entire album and seems to surround you like a tornado of sound. It also utilizes the loud/quiet formula you will find in Sun Ra (Heliocentric world), King Crimson (Crimson King) or other Miles records of the period. It has its own heart beat that tumbles along, buoyed by sounds from seemingly ill-fitting instruments (Jingle bells???) jangly symbols and some exceptional blasts of rock n roll guitar. Very deep and murky, mysterious and otherworldly, alternative and challenging yet instantly familiar and interesting. A great experiment, a wonderful adventure to go on.

It just keeps going, a smorgasbord of sounds. A record that would predate the rise of alternative music by many, many years. Miles was simply further ahead of the curve than even he realized this time. Maybe it isn't strictly speaking a jazz record, but I'd stop before describing it as funk in the purest way or rock, or fusion, or soul...But its all in there, a cultural document with grooves saturated in prevalent thought of the time, civil rights, pan-Africanism (check the congo-ized percussion on 'Vote for Miles') politics (Mr. Freedom X) sex and free expression. While the other jazz players were sticking rigidly to formula and established patterns, Miles was reporting on the world of the time. Sticking his head out of the window, to hear the sound of the street, as he did his entire life.

This record deserves significant re-appraisal. You could start by buying it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Far out grooves, 30 Nov 2013
By 
Haider "So in Flow Ltd" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: On The Corner (MP3 Download)
For me, this is one of the best jazz / funk albums of all time. A deliberate attempt by Miles to capture the attention of young black music fans listening to rock & funk instead of jazz. It's discordant, aggressive, humorous & relentless in its grooves with some incredible musicians on board. Perhaps one of my top 5 favourite albums ever.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

On The Corner
On The Corner by Miles Davis
Buy MP3 Album3.96
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews