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41 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blu-Ray Version of The last of the mohicans - Superb
I have watched every version of this master piece, the Blu Ray version even beats the Laser Disc version.

The picture is so crystal clear you see new details of the film that you couldn't see before.

The audio is stunning.

None of the content is new, which is odd considering the original pre-edited version was apparently 3 hours long...
Published on 4 April 2012 by Steve Saviola

versus
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing Blu-ray
Firstly, I think this film is great.

Now on to the UK Blu-ray. Like reviews for the American one's the picture on this is also dark, I wonder if this is deliberate to hide the little or no effort they have put into the transfer. If you look at older films, such as Zulu or Alien,you will see how amazing blu-rays can be. This film is a lot newer and it really was...
Published on 6 Dec. 2012 by Draavig


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41 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blu-Ray Version of The last of the mohicans - Superb, 4 April 2012
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I have watched every version of this master piece, the Blu Ray version even beats the Laser Disc version.

The picture is so crystal clear you see new details of the film that you couldn't see before.

The audio is stunning.

None of the content is new, which is odd considering the original pre-edited version was apparently 3 hours long. This version is similar to the directors edition, but bizarrely Michael Mann removes the "Once we were here epic ending".

Here's hoping Mann releases an uncut 20th anniversary special edition!

Overall 10 out of 10, i loved every second.

Thanks for reading.
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29 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Rousing Adventure, 12 Jun. 2004
By A Customer
As an adaptation it's far from faithful to the book but manages to capture the spirit nevertheless.
In the midst of war, Cora (Madeleine Stowe), the daughter of a British General, falls in love with Hawkeye (Daniel Day Lewis), a white man raised by Indians. Their struggle to stay together inspite of the madness surrounding them forms the core of the story.
It is beautifully filmed - the landscapes are breathtaking and the fight/action scenes switch from being brutal to almost balletic at times. The acting is of a high quality throughout - Daniel Day Lewis makes a surprisingly convincing romantic lead in a departure from his previous roles and Madeleine Stowe is strong as the determined Cora. I'm no expert on the details of the time but there's plently of dirt, blood and sweat in evidence and it doesn't feel overly glamorised. The score is sublime.
If you love heroics and romance (not the soppy but the epic kind) then you will love this.
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellence, 19 April 2007
By 
K. C. Simm "kenart" (Lancashire UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This is the first real epic of new cinema if you wish to pay any credence to such classifications. It is also a very finely crafted film. Micheal Mann has not been hidebound by the Fennimore Cooper novel and some have seen that as a mistake. I do not. Performances are remarkable in particular Day Lewis as Hawkeye. Villans are villans but with reason. Magua knows what he is doing and why. Minor characters are given room to breath and the set piece battles are extremly well done. The main story line, the love story between Cora and Hawkeye is romantic without being mawkish and the secondary story of the battles between the British, French and Indians is told with feeling and understanding. There is passion and Drama here, the direction is strong, the cinematography and the soundtrack are stunning. If you have not seen it buy and enjoy.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Still not right!, 29 Nov. 2012
This review is from: The Last of the Mohicans [Blu-ray] [1992] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
Waited and waited for what probably is my all time favorite movie bar maybe Gladiator (Extended cut). I have the VHS, region 2 DVD, region 1 Directors Cut and now the Bluray definitive cut whats the difference? The original region 2 was the one released in UK cinema's and then on VHS and DVD. The Directors cut was released in the USA and added several scenes such as a longer battle at Fort William Henry and a different extended end scene speech by Chingachgook, minus some graphical violence (cut to Magua's elbow) between Chingachgook and Magua. It also emitted the Clannad waterfall music (Criminal) and many of (Daniel Day Lewis), Hawkeye's one liners such as 'Clean it up anyway', 'Just dropped in to see how you boys was doing' which gave him a slightly more arrogant and rebellious type of portrayal. The definitive version now includes the Clannad music, a slightly longer Fort William Henry Battle scene a different dialogue order when Hawkeye is talking to 'Sachem' in the Huron camp in French through Major Heyward and the original ending including the more graphical violence between Chingachgook and Magua , Hawkeye's one liners are still omitted. Why could we just not have the whole thing with an arrogant Hawkeye or at least both versions how hard must that be. The Bluray transfer appears ok and worth the purchase but slightly dark in places better than the DVD. Is it as good as good as Sky's HD version which is the original region 2 version.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Amazing!, 7 Feb. 2002
Daniel Day Lewis plays the part of a colonial named Hawkeye, the adopted son of the last of the Mohican tribe. The film explores the bloody nature of colonial times, while at the same time introducing a beatifully acted romance. Madeleine Stowe plays the part of a British general's daughter, who eventually falls for Hawkeye. Amongst the Chaos of war between the French and British, Michael Mann explores the cultural abyss between colonials and transplants, and the barbaric war methods of homogenous tribesman. This is an enlightening film, set in lavish locations, with amazing cinematography. The soundtrack is also astounding. Don't let this one pass you by!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'A 'GEM' (A GREAT BEGINNING FOR A GREAT ACTOR), 28 Oct. 2014
By 
rbmusicman (U.K) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Last of the Mohicans [Blu-ray] [1992] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
'Last of the Mohicans' is certainly one of my all-time-favourite movies, it has everything from love and
revenge to some brilliant action sequences.
The story is set in the middle of the 18th century at a time when 'Britain' and 'France' were in conflict
over the Northern Territories.
The British demanding that many from the Territories left their family to join a 'Militia' to fight the French,
while the French had help from the Indian tribes such as the 'Huron'
'Chingachgook' (Russell Means) along with his son 'Uncas' (Eric Schweig) and adopted son 'Hawkeye'
(Nathaniel Poe) played by 'Daniel Day Lewis' make a living in the forests close to Hudson-Bay hunting
as 'Chingachgook's' forefathers had done for centuries past.
The three are challenged to join the Militia' but refuse to do so.........
The Daughters 'Cora' (Madeleine Stowe) and 'Alice' (Jodhi May) of the commander at 'Fort William Henry'
'Colonel Edmund Munro' (Maurice Roeves) are on route to join him.
A column of soldiers accompany them commanded by 'Major Duncan Heyward' (Steven Waddington) who
has romantic notions toward 'Cora Munro'....they are joined on the journey by supposed friend of the British
'Magua' (Wes Studi) who acts as a guide.
However on route the column are attacked by followers of 'Magua' ...in the close-by forest 'Hawkeye' along
with his adopted family hear the disturbance and go to investigate.
'Alice' and 'Cora' along with the Major are saved by the three, the remainder perish at the hands of 'Magua's'
warriors.
When arriving close to the fort they find it to be under siege by the French. however 'Cora' and 'Alice' are smuggled
in by a little ingenuity from 'Hawkeye' 'Chingachgook' and 'Uncas' to join their father.
The fort is heavily outnumbered and outgunned by the French, with no help coming 'Colonel Munro' is forced to
accept the terms of surrender offered by the French Commander, they are offered safe passage on the understanding
that they just keep travelling until they reach the shores of Britain,though the French Commander knows that he is
only releasing the soldiers to fight another day.
'Magua' who has vowed to avenge his children that 'Col Munro's' forces had killed sometime before, he intends to kill
'Cora' and 'Alice' then rip out the Heart of the Colonel.
'Magua' and his warriors ambush the retreating column, only the few survive, 'Hawkeye' who has now fallen for 'Cora'
saves the sisters again with his adoped brother and father-figure escaping in a canoe, as have 'Major Heyward' and
a small number of soldiers.
The story continues with 'Magua' and a now small band of warriors giving chase one that will lead to tragedy for some,
with a finally as 'Magua' squares up to both 'Uncas' and then 'Chingachgook' one to one.
As mentioned earlier this remains a favourite of mine, it has a good story-line coupled with plenty of action sequences.
This was 'Daniel Day Lewis's' depute, what a superb opening role for him.
The Blu-ray upgrade is superb.
Special Features -
* The Directors Definitive Cut
* Commentary by Michael Mann
* Making of The Last of The Mohicans featurette.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Masterful epic that has stood the test of time, 27 April 2011
By 
Michael Badu (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This film is masterful because the key decisions were 'got right' in 1992. Daniel Day Lewis as Nathaniel, famously ran around in the woods for weeks, intensely preparing for the role and almost a decade on, it shows. He is, like his surrogate Mohican companions completely believable. Thus is doesn't matter that the style of the film is slightly dated in places; that some of the acting seems a little 'hammy' (some of the accents dodgy) 9 years on. Wes Studi as the embittered Magua brings a creation to the screen the like of which, almost had never been seen before, or has been seen since. The key actors in the movie having successfully been transmuted into the the 18th century protagonists (because, this is the calibre of acting were talking about), Michael Mann did what he does best and concentrated on capturing what the actors were doing, as well as the context that they were responding to, and what you get is a sweeping visual feast bringing 18th century frontier America to life. This, letting of masterful performers 'do their thing' while he concentrates on capturing them and their background is what takes Michael Mann's films often to great heights, but when the actors aren't up to the job, this method can leave his movies lacking substance. This film is an instance where the Michael Mann method works really well and even after 9 years, watching it is a heady authentic experience as the combination of immersive acting and direction ( one almost imagines Mann running around, camera in hand with a long Mohican hairstyle, running after Day-Lewis and his companions - the men of action one shot muskets in hand, whose actions are approved of by the wild woods of the American Frontier ) sweeps you up in a visual narrative of rare power. The score is an portent ingredient and is spot on.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars They could still makes them like they used to, 7 April 2009
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
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NB: As is Amazon's Wont, they've very unhelpfully bundled all the reviews for various editions and formats together. This review refers to Warners' DVD release of the original theatrical version, one of three different cuts of the film - the original US DVD is a director's cut that dissatisfied many of the fans of the film by cutting some of the best-loved moments while the version on Blu-ray in the US and UK is a third cut that has decent extras but suffers from a dark transfer.

The Last of the Mohicans is a grand, sweeping epic romantic adventure that - in the original theatrical version at least - deserves its reputation as a modern classic.

Openly based as much on the now rarely seen Randolph Scott version from 1936 as on James Fenimore Cooper's novel, the scale is genuinely spectacular and the pacing spot-on, making for one of the most exciting and well-crafted pictures of the 90s. Despite the surface absurdity of casting and English actor and an American actress as respectively American and English characters (though in the novel Cora was actually Scottish, Madeline Stowe thankfully doesn't try the accent), the performances are well drawn. Daniel Day Lewis makes a classical hero in every sense of the word, but the supporting cast also manage to bring surprising depth to their roles. Steve Waddington, as the fiancé uneasily caught between loyalty to his country and to his own code of honour and Maurice Roeves' Colonel Munro are never duplicitous stereotypes, and, like Wes Studi's vengeful Magua and French director Patrice Chereau's outwardly humane yet slightly ambiguous French General Montcalm, never feel like mere ciphers there only to advance the story. Even Jodhi May, most of whose part got lost during the famously unpleasant shoot, manages to convey more with a single look than many actors can with a monologue. Everyone has their own valid reasons for their actions.

There is for once a real sense of time and place around the characters. The historical subtext of a nation moving towards revolution through the callous indifference of its distant government is woven into the narrative without overpowering it. The seeds of the American War of Independence and the end of Empire are hinted at and the complexity of the Colonial wars is used to add to the central drama rather than detract from it.

Unlike the empty stylistics of Miami Vice or the spectacularly self-conscious botched job of The Keep, here Michael Mann adopts a classical style that serves the story well. His use of long shots and long takes rather than close-ups and rapid-fire cutting combines with excellent production and costume design to not only create a convincing world but give you the time to get drawn into it.

The Scope composition is outstanding, using every inch and aspect of the frame to stunning effect. This is a film you really do need to see in widescreen, true CINEMA-Scope with no compensations made to the small screen. Scenes like the parlay between the English and French armies are not only robbed of their epic scale in fullframe but also of their sense of pace - with the peripheral action lost, the huge crowd scene is reduced to four men talking in a field. Dane Spinotti and Doug Milsome's photography is so sumptuous it makes the cold, flat, grainy look of Mann's recent digitally shot features look all the more disappointing, its use of reds and earth tones creating a vivid frontier world that is both visually and dramatically satisfying.

The only caveat is that some of the scoring (by no fewer than four composers) seems badly spotted and in the wrong place: despite strong work from Trevor Jones and Randy Edelman's underappreciated contribution, it is tempting to imagine cues being switched to different scenes to greater effect. Certainly the inclusion of a Clannad song actively works against the scene it accompanies and feels like a half-hearted commercial move.

A work of intelligence and emotion, if you love adventure movies this definitely deserves a place in your collection. However, be warned that while the UK DVD PAL edition is the original and superior theatrical version of the film (with isolated score and theatrical trailer the only extras), the NTSC version is Michael Mann's first director's cut - and quite a mess he's made of it, hacking away at sections that worked beautifully to make room for scenes that add little and losing much of the flavour and character of the original. Although the cut has a bit more action, it has a lot less heart and becomes rather a chore to sit through. The UK Blu-ray release is of Mann's SECOND director's cut (few directors re-edit their films as regularly as Mann), which is abit of an improvement but has dark picture quality, though it does have an accompanying documentary. But lovers of the original and best cut of the film are best advised to stick to the original UK DVD release.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best action adventure pictures ever made., 25 Jan. 2015
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One of the best motion pictures ever made. An emotional, rich journey full of plenty of twists and turns, with the perfect hero to root for in Day-Lewis.

The most impressive aspect of the entire film is director Michael Mann's eye for scenery- as this movie contains some of the most breath-taking in cinematic history. The love story between Lewis and Stowe is constructed beautifully, and the plot is paced to utter perfection. In addition, Wes Studi turns in a frightening, unforgettable performance as a man stripped of basic human emotions, whose thirst for revenge is what makes him so terrifying, since that is about all that drives him.

The ending of the film is simply magnificent, and I have to say out of all the movies I've seen, this one features the best finale to a film that I can recall. It is intense, beautiful, stirring, and ultimately tragic but perfectly executed - I'm moved every time I see it, and that's a testimony to the movie's ability to harness its power even after all the times I've viewed it. The score is also the best of the films I've seen - what a soaring soundtrack. Without question Michael Mann's best film, and one of my all-time favourite movies.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, heartfelt and well-acted, 4 Dec. 2006
This movie tells, mostly, the epic love story of Cora Munro, the strong-willed daughter of a Scots colonel, and Hawkeye, white adopted son of Chingachook of the dying Mohican tribe. Caught in the blood and mayhem of the French and Indian War in 1757, Cora meets the rugged frontiersman when he, his "father" and "brother", Uncas, save her, her sister Alice and their escort, Major Duncan Heyward, during an ambush. The passion growing between Cora and Hawkeye is challenged by Duncan's jealousy and the bloodlust of Magua, a Huron war-leader bent on revenge.

This is a masterpiece because it combines inspired cinematography and score with a layered story that blends epic symbolism with a stirring attention to human emotion. Although it focuses on Cora and Hawkeye, the minor characters are also given space; we see Duncan's weakness and internal struggle, Magua's bitterness and, most skillfully, the love of Uncas and Alice. Totally overshadowed by Cora and Hawkeye, the romantic awakening of timid Alice and quiet Uncas is shown in tiny flashes and only at the end do they shine, and you realize the power of their feelings quite matches those of their bolder siblings.

The ethereal, panoramic views are glory enough, but the score is perhaps the best I've heard in a soundtrack. It captures the mood and the era - the exotic drumbeats mixed with the poignant European orchestra. It makes you soar, but hints at grief; it reminds you that these people were at the mercy of the wilderness, embodied as much by the savagery of the war as by the humbling environment.

I recommend this film because it rests firmly not just on cast or crew or script, but all three. It portrays the frontier as a crucible for social and racial distinction, but also for moral and emotional boundaries. As a date romance, an action adventure, or a human drama best studied over and over (as I have), it is EXCELLENT!
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The Last of the Mohicans [Blu-ray] [1992] [Region Free]
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