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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Now raise your weapons or I'll kill him with this deadly jellybaby."
Best remembered for introducing one of the Time Lord's most memorable companions, the warrior Leela, Doctor Who - The Face of Evil has a lot more to recommend it than Louise Jameson's skimpy costume fuelling millions of schoolboys' and their dads' fantasies. It's a surprisingly compelling mystery that sees the Doctor arrive on a planet plagued by invisible monsters (not...
Published 19 months ago by Trevor Willsmer

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3.0 out of 5 stars Who Am I?
I have to say that this is not one of my favourite productions. Chris Boucher's script is let down by a very shiny looking studio for much of the jungle scenes and some very cod Shakespeare speech from a so-called savage tribe. Louise Jameson is the highlight of this story and has a very strong debut. Elisabeth Sladen was a tough act to follow but Louise brings something...
Published 1 month ago by SalfordRed2


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Now raise your weapons or I'll kill him with this deadly jellybaby.", 9 Dec 2012
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Face Of Evil [DVD] (DVD)
Best remembered for introducing one of the Time Lord's most memorable companions, the warrior Leela, Doctor Who - The Face of Evil has a lot more to recommend it than Louise Jameson's skimpy costume fuelling millions of schoolboys' and their dads' fantasies. It's a surprisingly compelling mystery that sees the Doctor arrive on a planet plagued by invisible monsters (not the only time the show would borrow from Forbidden Planet in Tom Baker's tenure), a tormented villain with the doctor's voice who makes others act out the images of his torment and two warring tribes, one primitive, the other more hi-tech. While he's trying to work out whether they're the captors of a survey team that crashed on the planet or their children, it gradually emerges that we're watching a sequel to a story that was never told by the series, one that deals with the disastrous long-term consequences of his interfering in the past - so far in the past that it's not until the terrific visual punchline to episode one that he even remembers it...

It's one of Baker's best stories, and in Leela he has a surprisingly vicious (at least at first) and ferocious companion, one who actually kills and is proud of her deadly prowess. It's quite a leap from the Victorian Pygmalion figure the role was initially intended and yet despite, as Jameson informs us in an interview on the DVD, being based on a combination of her dog and the little girl who lived in the flat upstairs, she's not presented in a patronising way as a bit of cheesecake with a blade: she can look after herself and is more likely to rescue the doctor than need rescuing herself. It also benefits from surprisingly good design for its jungle planet, something of a Doctor Who speciality in the Pertwee-Baker years, making it one of those stories that for the most part looks as good as its script is ingenious.

There's another good extras package on the disc too - audio commentary by Jameson and co-stars and crew, deleted footage, as well as other featurettes, vintage toy commercials and a stills gallery that reveals the initial horribly misjudged blackface makeup for Leela. Most revealing is that interview with Jameson that doesn't skirt over her difficult working relationship at the time with Baker. He famously didn't want to have a sidekick at all, and the opening episode shows why that wasn't likely to have worked as he wanders around not so much talking to himself to explain the kind of plot points he'd normally fill his sidekick in on as he is talking directly to the camera. It doesn't quite break the fourth wall but without the audience surrogate figure doesn't work half as well. He may not have been happy with the solution at the time, but there's no doubting that it worked wonderfully and that this story made a superb introduction. Oh, and don't forget to watch out for the Janus thorns.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It will not disappoint. THE FACE OF EVIL is balanced, informative and entertaining., 12 Mar 2012
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Face Of Evil [DVD] (DVD)
Even after nearly decade's worth of DOCTOR WHO - CLASSIC SERIES DVD releases once a while one is released that could you comfortably re-watch several times without becoming bored or restless, and Chris Boucher's penned, DOCTOR WHO - THE FACE OF EVIL is one of them. It's like sitting your Aunt's knee as she reads you a bedtime story - reassuringly secure.

Admittedly, it is frequently overshadowed by those stories around it - THE DEADLY ASSASSIN, THE ROBOTS OF DEATH, THE TALONS OF WENG-CHIANG- but, by no means, it's a production to be ashamed of or irritated by. Solid, interesting, elegant at times, understated performances that a founded in truth and reality (even though it's science fiction drama) and, of course, eyeofhorus.org.uk's favourite, Louise Jameson introduced as Leela.

With a cleaned and restored print (probably better than you originally viewed on your rental television back in 1977...), THE FACE OF EVIL's release is supplemented with an informative (with sleight repetitive recollections from the actors and crews alike is the only downside across the documentaries & commentary), entertaining and polished array of EXTRAS.

INTO THE WILD confidently documents the `making of...' process with insightful contributions from the Series Producer, Philip Hinchcliffe:

Philip Hinchcliffe: I came up with the idea of a computer going mad. Being `God'.

Whilst the recently deceased (2010) director of THE FACE OF EVIL, Pennant Roberts (interviewed in 2005) and Louise Jameson discuss the genesis of the character of Leela, and how Jameson distilled the personality of her dog, Boisie, and her neighbour's three-year old daughter into the creation of the alien `savage'.

Talking of the story's director, Jameson: ...very long and affectionate friendship with Pennant and his wife over the years.

Visual Effects Designer, Mat Irvine, made his `solo' debut with this production and discusses the challenges of working to tight schedules and limited, shoestring budgets.

In a rare appearance, one-time DOCTOR WHO set designer, Austin Ruddy, confirms that he a "free hand to do what we wanted to do". As fans would confirm, his designs were stunningly creative especially the planet's stylist `jungle' and the perennial problem of `how to do another DOCTOR WHO corridor'. Indeed, the Series Producer states that he was "...a top designer. I'd put it up high in some of my DOCTOR WHOs".

Unsurprisingly, INTO THE WILD's contribution from Jameson is central to this documentary feature, and addresses the (Janis) thorny issue of her working relationship with the lead actor.

On Tom Baker, Louise Jameson: He was a totally brilliant Doctor...strained at times...and we're extremely good friends now.

Overall, IN THE WILD is a more a tribute to Pennant Roberts and less of a "Making of...", and quite rightly so.

FROM THE CUTTING ROOM FLOOR is as gripping as Hitchcock thriller, and all it is are `out-takes' and `unused' material from the production. With a couple of expletives `bleeped-out', it's beguiling that the filming was so good natured, calm and professional in the face of adversity (re: BBC Union Electricians poised like vipers to terminate the studio lighting at 22:00 prompt). The deleted scenes, all from the Ealing Studio filmed sequences, are presented slotted into the broadcast material and demonstrate how single-camera filming, compared with multi-camera shooting on videotape, is far more polished.

The weakest of the documentaries is DOCTOR WHO STORIES: LOUISE JAMESON as, sadly, the recollections from the seminal actress are duplication from both INTO THE WILD and the STUDIO COMMENTARY. Nonetheless, Jameson is singularly known for her affection (and gratitude) for being cast in DOCTOR WHO, and her memories are, like a complicated Sherry Trifle, layered and wholly satisfying with numerous Glace cherries topping it off. You'll just have to watch this feature to find out why she asks the BBC DVD interview, "Am I allowed to say crap?". Delightful.

Even in 1977, I couldn't afford the (expensive due to high tax rates) DOCTOR WHO action figures so seeing the DENYS FISHER TOYS ADVERT for the first time is like owning your very own time machine. The 4.99 of 1977 (circa) TARDIS would be worth about 35.00 in today's money, and with weekly pocket money of 50 pence it was far out of my reach (and I preferred buying the pocket-money friendly TARGET novels).

In the 1970s, a staple of the weekends was `The Multi-Coloured Swap Shop' magazine programme, presented by the engaging Noel Edmonds, and to have a DOCTOR WHO guest it was essential viewing. Louise Jameson effortlessly effervesces as she charms the unflappable Edmonds as she discusses how she secured the role of Leela and the filming of the series.

Wendy Padbury presents press coverage of Tom Baker's time as the ignominious Time Lord in TOMORROW'S TIMES - THE FOURTH DOCTOR. The selected print clippings are witty, definitive and informative, and recall a press campaign, S.O.L. (`Save Our Leela'), to try to revert Jameson's decision to leave the series.

The COMING SOON TRAILER is the Pertwee classic, DOCTOR WHO - THE DAEMONS.

The STUDIO COMMENTARY is a true pick-n-mix of cast and crew, ably moderated, cajoled and coerced by actor, Toby Hadoke.

Recorded in 2010, contributions are from Louise Jameson (Leela), Leslie Schofield (Calib), David Garfield (Neeva), Harry H Fielder ("Tribe member"), Mike Ellis (Gentek), John McGlashan (Film Cameraman) and Philip Hinchcliffe (Series Producer).

On her costume unveiling, Louise Jameson: ...caused a bit of a stir.

On a `wardrobe malfunction', Harry H Fielder: Terry Walsh (Stuntman) told me how to fall on that shot (killed by a cross bow arrow) but when I fell the `wedding tackle' fell out my loincloth.
Louise Jameson (laughter).
Harry H Fielder: ...but `they' (production team) said, "It was only a small thing.

On her relationship with a DOCTOR WHO legacy, Louise Jameson: The loyalist fans in the world, DOCTOR WHO fans they are.

On Tom Baker's relationship with Leela, Louise Jameson: He didn't like Leela from the get go. But he loved the programme.
Phillip Hinchcliffe: Tom was the star (of the show) but Bob (Holmes - Script Editor) and I were the bosses.

BBC DVD's release of DOCTOR WHO - THE FACE OF EVIL is balanced, informative and entertaining, and will ensure that even for most jaded of long-term fans will be cosseted by a `warm and fuzzy feeling' - like being hugged the Muppet's Fozzy Bear - taking them back to a time when Fish Fingers and Baked Beans were perched on the lap in front of Saturday evening television. And for NEW SERIES fans, THE FACE OF EVIL DVD release is a one of the accessible stories that they could discover for the first time.

It will not disappoint.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dr Who - The Face of Evil (1977) - When Dr Who became Dr Henry Higgins (My Fair Lady), 31 Dec 2011
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Face Of Evil [DVD] (DVD)
The Face of Evil is the beginning of the new era for Dr Who. It all started in January 1977 when viewers, especially the male population caught their first sights of Louise Jamieson as Leela. Leela was very different to the Doctor's previous assistant Sarah Jane Smith. Leela was savage, but she was very brave in an understanding way.

I would like to say to any Tom Baker fan to get this adventure as the acting is first class from the lead actors Tom Baker and Louise Jamieson to the brilliant casting of the Savateem from Brendan Price as Tomas, Victor Lucas as Andor, Leslie Schofield as Calid to the casting of the Tesh from Leon Eagles as Jabel and Miles Ellis as Gentek, but all acting glory goes to David Garfield as the Savateem Holy, but misguided mystic Neeva who grand and over top performance is the crowning glory to this 1977 Dr Who adventure.

I am looking forward to more 1970s classics like the Mind of Evil, The Ambassadors of Death, Terror of the Zygons, Nightmare of Eden, plus the BBC should issue a seperate Special Edition DVD of 'The Revenge of the Cybermen' (similar to the 1972 Jon Pertwee Dr Who adventure 'Day of the Daleks') for true 1970s Dr Who Tom Baker fans. The BBC should also use advance and realistic CGI to re-create the missing 1979 Tom Baker adventure 'Shada'.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best, of all-times!, 19 Aug 2012
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Face Of Evil [DVD] (DVD)
It really is surprising that many Doctor Who fans don't rate this movie among their 'top ten'-s. It has one of the finest time-travel paradox stories ever in the history of Doctor Who (maybe second only to "Blink"). It shows Leela (a new companion who is strikingly different from all her predecessors) in all her action-oriented glory. It also shows, through the story again, the consequences of actions that are committed by the Doctor, often without the necessary amount of consideration that was actually called for. Brilliant episode, and most definitely worth repeat-viewings. Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Definitely worth a look!, 31 May 2012
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Face Of Evil [DVD] (DVD)
I haven't seen this story for a good few years and nearly didn't bother buying the dvd but I thought I'd give it a go and after watching it now I am very surprised about how good it holds up. There are some great lines from Tom and good acting all round. The commentary is entertaining and the extra's are good. I'm giving this 4 stars as it isn't quite up there with The Robots of Death and The Talons of Weng-Chiang which follow this story.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Your face is familiar, 27 Mar 2012
By 
Paul Tapner (poole dorset england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Face Of Evil [DVD] (DVD)
The fourth story of Tom Baker's third year as Doctor Who comes to dvd. With all four twenty five minute long episodes presented on a single disc.

This story also saw the first appearance of Louise Jameson as his companion Leela.

It sees the Doctor - travelling on his own - visit a jungle planet. Where there are two tribes. In the jungle live the rather primitive Sevateem. Of whom Leela is a member. Elsewhere on the planet live the rather more advanced Tesh. And everyone mentions a god called Xoanon.

But at the same time, one look at the Doctor's face has people shocked and calling him the evil one. And there are deadly invisible creatures in the jungle. With the help of Leela, the Doctor aims to find the truth about the planet. But a surprise and a familiar face await him....

This comes from an era that most regard as the best of the original seris, a time when the show was at the height of it's powers. With a charismatic star and a production team who were taking the programme to new heights. Thus it's a polished and excellent production with Tom Baker well at home in the lead role. The jungle set is superb considering that it's all studio bound. All the supporting cast take it totally seriously and turn in good work. And Louise Jameson instantly makes an impression as Leela. Making her a smart and brave individual who just happens to come from a primitive planet and thus has little knowledge and experience outside her own realm. But one who is smart enough to learn. There are certain violents elements about the character's behaviour that did get flak at the time, but these vanish in due course.

The story is also something that the programme hasn't done all that often. It's genuine science fiction. A totally alien and well worked out world with a mystery at the heart of it.

It's not the greatest story ever made but it's a very good one from a great era. And thus it's worth five stars.

The dvd has the following language and subtitle options;

Languages: English.

Subtitles: English.

It also has English audio navigation.

The extras are the usual:

Commentary from several members of the cast and crew [including Louise Jameson and producer Philip Hinchcliffe, but not on this occasion Tom Baker].

Production infromation subtitles.

A photo gallery of stills from the story and it's production.

A coming soon trailer for the next release in this dvd range.

The radio times listings for the story as PDF Files.

Also as a PDF file [viewable by putting the disc into a computer and opening said files] are a reproduction of a 1976 Typhoo tea Doctor Who promotion.

Other extras:

A typically excellent twenty five minute long making of documentary about the story.

From the cutting room floor: Nine minutes of film of it being made. This does have onscreen captions to explain what you're seeing being done so it works quite well and is quite interesting.

Tomorrow's times: the Fourth Doctor. Latest in a series of these, which has looked as how news media reported the era of each Doctor. This one is presented by Wendy Padbury [Second Doctor companion Zoe] and whilst it has it's moments it only runs for twelve minutes, thus it gets through the era rather quickly and has little of substance.

More substance can be found in Doctor Who stories: Louise Jameson. This, as with the recent one about Elizabeth Sladen on an earlier release from this year, was originally recorded in 2003 and uses the same format of discussing aspects of her time on the show in various sections. But it's a good interview and very enjoyable, although it does duplicate a little of the material from the making of documentary.

There's also a four minute long extract from an appearance Louise Jameson made on saturday morning kids show Swap Shop [which will be familiar as it was on the VHS release of the story].

There's also a tv advert for a range of Doctor Who toys - including the Doctor and Leela - that were released in the mid 70's. This advert is so very 1970's in style it should bring back many memories of the time.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Leela's first adventure, 23 May 2012
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Face Of Evil [DVD] (DVD)
I was a teenager when this first went to air, I was a bit crazy about Leela with her skimpy costume and tough character.
This DVD Face Of Evil has a lot of very enjoyable and informative extras. I did not know that Tom Baker and Louise Jameson did not get on during her time in Doctor Who. Louise is a very down to earth lady and she tells us her story very detailed and thorough.
The actual show is not one of the best Doctor Who shows but it does have some great acting from Tom Baker and Leela is fantastic.
The effects are good but the story is a bit thin for me. However this is a historic piece of film and a big transition stage in the era of Doctor Who, a worthy purchase for that alone if you are a fan.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Leela's Debut? - NB!, 26 July 2000
By A Customer
Arriving in a marshy jungle on some distant alien world, the Doc is suprised when the savage natives, the Sevateem, recognise him as ''the Evil One'' despite the fact that he has never seen them before, nor set foot on this very planet. Or has he? On the run from the Sevateem, the Doctor finds that his only ally is Leela, an outcast from the tribe, and he begins to unravel a mystery inextricably linked to his own shady past...
A break from the gothic tales that populate Baker's early years, The Face Of Evil is blessed with an intelligent and thought-provoking, if somewhat slow, script and some brill performances. Baker's at his boyish best and Louise Jameson makes nice her debut as Leela, although she isn't as good as in her next story - bloody masterpiece The Robots Of Death. Speaking of that tale, it is worth mentioning that Face has often been overlooked in favour of Robots, Talons or The Deadly Assassin, but trust me, it's a worthy purchase.
James
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Doctor faces past actions in a cracking Baker adventure, 4 Jun 2000
By A Customer
The Face of Evil is unusual in many respects. It finally gives us a story that examines the consequences of the Doctor's sometimes irresponsible actions. It gives us Leela, the savage who would just as soon knife someone as trip over and scream. And who can forget those strange cliffhangers? (Part 3 especially)
This is a weird and wonderful adventure set on an unnamed planet population by a savage tribe, the Sevateem, and a technologically advanced society who practice mind control, the Tesh. But by far the best character in this is Xoanon, the mysterious God of both tribes.
This is one of the best Fourth Doctor adventures you are likely to see, and a big round of applause for Chris Boucher, the writer, who also comes up with the Robots of Death and the Image of the Fendhal.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Evil Doctor?, 19 April 2014
By 
Timelord007 (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Face Of Evil [DVD] (DVD)
Dvd Info.
Running time 96 minutes approx, Rgion 2, Digitally remastered picture & sound.

Extras.
Commentary, Into the wild making of The Face Of Evil documentary, From the cutting room floor archive behind the scenes, Photo gallery, Swap Shop featuring Louise Jameson, Tomorrows times featurette, Louise Jameson interview, Coming soon trailer & more...

Trivia.
1)Until the conclusion of Horror Of Fang Rock actress Louise Jameson wore dark contact lenses which made her eye's quite sore.
2)Leelas Doctor Who debut.
3)Neeva played by actor David Garfield featured in Big Finish Sixth Doctor Lost Story audio adventures The Hollows Of Time as Professor Stream aka (Master).
4)Originally transmitted 1st January-22nd January 1977.

Synopsis.
The Fourth Doctor arrives on a mysterious Jungle planet were he meets two tribes the savage like Sevateem & the technological advanced Tesh who are at war with one another.

Exploring this mysterious planet the Doctor meets Leela a exiled warrior of the Sevateem who profaning the God Xoenon who communicates via the shaman Neeva is dismissed as a tribal outcast.

Leela has refused to take the tribal ritual of the Horda so her father named Sole takes the test in Leelas place & dies while taking the ritual of the Horda.

The Doctor meets Leela who Leela describes the Doctor as The Evil One due to his appearance being identical to of that of the false God Xoenon.

The Doctor suspects he may have been to this planet before & seeing his features carved into a mountain nearby the Doctor realizes he has & maybe the cause of this continual on going war between these two warring tribes.

What is the connection between the Doctor & Xoenon, Who really are the Sevateem? & can the Doctor's intellect beat the awesome power of the mighty Evil One?

Timelord Thoughts.
Writer Chris Boucher has written a wonderful Doctor Who adventure here brimming with a great story concept which features the debut of Leela played wonderfully by actress Louise Jameson who differs from other Doctor Who companions like Sarah Jane or Jo Grant as Leela is a savage warrior bringing something new to the mix of the strange world of Doctor Who.

Tom Baker again gives another excellent eccentric performance as the Doctor who channels the eccentric alien quality of the character like no other actor has before or since Tom.

Tom Baker also voices the villainous Xoenan in this story with such malevolent evil that it sent chills down my spine & is testimony of Tom's excellent range of vocal acting as he can make the Evil One sound quite disturbing & sinister.

This has all the ingredients of a Doctor Who classic, Superbly written by Chris Boucher & tightly directed by Pennant Rovberts featuring a mesmerizing performance by Tom Baker & features an excellent debut by Louise Jameson as Leela.

9/10.
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