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44 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The definitive version
This is the definitive film, taken from the definitive book, about the sinking of RMS Titanic. As the "making of..." points out, Walter Lord researched the disaster for twenty years before publishing his book. As a result almost everything is correct.

I can only find two innaccuracies: As another reviewer points out, the ship does not break in this version,...
Published on 13 Oct 2008 by Parkie

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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The classic Titanic film, but beware...
A Night to Remember is *the* Titanic film. The true story and nothing but. This release also includes an excellent documentary about the making of the film which has behind-the-scenes home movies shot by the producer, Willam MacQuitty.

Unfortunately Carlton have released the film itself in 'widescreen' at a ratio of 1.33:1. The film was shot in the standard...
Published on 19 Oct 2010 by Enoch Sneed


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44 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The definitive version, 13 Oct 2008
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This is the definitive film, taken from the definitive book, about the sinking of RMS Titanic. As the "making of..." points out, Walter Lord researched the disaster for twenty years before publishing his book. As a result almost everything is correct.

I can only find two innaccuracies: As another reviewer points out, the ship does not break in this version, as the official report at the time took only Lightoller's account as fact. At the time the ship broke he was held underwater by the suction, only released from by the blast when the icy water reached the boilers. The only other inaccuracy is that the band did not play "Nearer my God to Thee". They were part way through "Autumn", which has a similar tune, when the ship lurched and they were thrown down the deck. The legend about the hymn is attributed to many sources and is probably due to the similarity of the two tunes and an unknown person singing the actual hymn.

The film does not rely on invented romances, family sagas, crime dramas and the other filler material that all the other versions I have seen rely on in an attempt to "engage" the audience. The filmmakers quite rightly believed that the actual story of the loss of the most technically advanced passenger ship in the world, with the loss of two thirds of it's passengers and crew, is dramatic enough without such nonsense. They cleverly use unidentified composite characters alongside the real people to show the points of view of all three classes aboard. This avoids the embarrassing name dropping that occurs in other versions, where the famous names of the day are forced into the action with contrived explanations of who they were for contemporary viewers. Guggenheim, The Strausses, and Molly Brown are all there, but are accurately depicted and are part of the overall story.

Not only is The Californian controversy is explored, but perhaps more importantly, the heroic achievement of the Carpathia and her crew is given due recognition. Built for a top speed of 14 knots, she made 17 on her race to assist the stricken liner, her engines shaking the whole ship with the effort.

The casting is amazing, just about everyone is a ringer for the actual person they depict. And the acting is faultless from all involved.

The manners and attitudes of the age are expertly captured, for example, some first class ladies did complain about men smoking in the lifeboats. This was because smoking was seen at the time as a pleasurable indulgence, and appeared to be a crass and disrespectful act to such ladies. The moment when the third class passengers burst into the deserted first class restaurant is heartbreaking as they gaze around at such luxury for the only time in their lives.

The effects in the film are, in my opinion, far more convincing than CGI effects, including a wonderful overhead shot of the ship steaming through the night. And the sinking itself is both amazing and awful to watch in it's stunning realism.
There is no need for invented incidents here, either, everything that happens is documented as fact.

It is good to see that one of the most remarkable characters in the event is depicted as well, the baker, Charles Joughin. Sorry to any Jack and Rose fans reading this, but Mr Joughin was the last person off the ship, actually standing on the upturned stern as it slid smoothly beneath the surface. His full story is told in the original book upon which this film is based, which I would also highly recommend to anyone interested in this subject.
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87 of 89 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars classic disaster film, 27 Jan 2005
By 
Ms. H. Sinton "dragondrums" (Ingleby Barwick. U.K.) - See all my reviews
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This 1958, black and white film tells the story of the ill fated Titanic. Unlike the Oscar winning James Cameron version, there are no high tech special effects, and, more importantly, no made up romances to detract from the story. Instead, what you have is a true story, produced in a straight forward manner that is far more gripping than any fiction.
An important omission in the Cameron version is the proximity of another ship, The California, and it's inability, (or refusal), to help the stricken liner, an issue that is addressed in this version. This is a film that has focused more on the actual events of that fateful night in 1912 rather than on the relationships between various passengers. It certainly pumps up the tension, even though everyone knows the outcome. There is always a part of you hoping that this time the Titanics desperate calls for help will be answered.
Starring Kenneth More, Honor Blackman and a young David McCallum, this movie has stood the test of time and is well worth a viewing.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A marvellous film, 24 May 2007
A Night to Remember is the definitive film of them all (for the facts that were know in 1958), so much detail is included - and its the only one to focus not only on Titanic but also what was happening on the Californian and Carpathia during that fateful night. It also avoided fictional romantic sub plots and stuck to the events that night bordering between drama and documentary.

Kenneth More was amazing in his portral Charles Lighttoller - it was perhaps the best perfomance of his entire career. What made the film a success was not only a tight script but the fact that director

William MacQuitty (who had seen the ship as a boy) had a surviving officer as technical advisor 4th Officer Joseph Boxhall and also many survivors were still alive that could be interviewed, some of which visited the film set. It was the most expensive film of the 1950s for the rank organisation circa at 450k with good special effects for the time. Sit back and enjoy the all star cast, Honor Blackman,

David McCallum, Kenneth Griffith and look out for early uncredited roles for actors Desmond LLelywn, Stratford Johns, Norman Rossington and Sean Connery.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than Titantic!, 26 Nov 2006
By 
SJ SMART "Smartie" (London) - See all my reviews
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This is the original classic story of the sinking of the Titanic. It was filmed in 1958 in black and white in a big tank at Pinewood Studios with no CGI but despite this the filmakers have portrayed the sinking very well with a lot of details and great performances. The black and white images instead of being a problem or a minus I feel add to the film, after all its set in the freezing North Atlantic at night, not a lot of colour there! Still very moving and powerful and if you liked Cameron's Titantic then you should like this too but no Rose or Jack though! I am sure Cameron must have watched this film as there a lot of similairities. Anyway its a good film and deserves a watch. Enjoy, if thats the right word!
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great British film!, 28 May 2002
By A Customer
I first saw this film many years ago and have seen it many times since. Its definetly a great British movie of a terrible disaster when 1,500 people lost their lives when unsinkable Titanic hit an iceberg and sank on a bitterly cold April night during 1912. I bought the vidoe version some years ago, and the DVD version quite recently. Overall, the DVD version is a better picture and contains a fascinating documentary "The Making of...." However, I noticed some slight cuts in the DVD version and also through part of the film, a vertical dark line from top to bottom of the film which is noticeable in the dark scenes. This is a pity cos its such a fine film. Nevertheless, its still worth a buy cos of the extras available on the disc.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 2012 Blu-Ray Review - in a word "stunning", 21 Mar 2012
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This review is about the BLU-RAY release of "A Night To Remember" - NOT about the film itsself.

It is amazing how some films, shot over 50 years ago in standard definition and in black and white can look so visually stunning on Blu-Ray. This is a perfect example. The high-definition transfer is incredibly sharp; the picture is excellent, far superior than the DVD prints that are available. I cannot praise the video quality high enough - it is stunning, sharp and crisp.

The extras on the disc (presented at 720p) include:
*"The Making of" (the same 1-hour documentary that is also available on the DVD)
*Original trailer
*Split-screen showing the restoration of the film
*Production Notes
*Original Costume Notes
*Press & Publicity
*Behind the scenes gallery
*General Production gallery

The picture is presented in 16:9 PB (there are thin black bars at the side of the picture rather than at the top/bottom to accomodate the ratio)

Distributor: ITV Studios Home Entertainment
Catalogue No.: 37115 35153
Certificate: PG
Running time: 123 mins 18 seconds (the sleeve says 118 mins, which is inaccurate)
Sound: LPCM 2.0 Dolby Digital
Video: MPEG4-AVC
Chapters: 12

Any fan of this film shouldn't even hesitate........ BUY IT ON BLU-RAY!

One note:
The film is TOO clean........ in the scene where Laurence Naismith (the Captain) takes the bullhorn and says "abandon ship" near the end, you can see the Pinewood car park in the background, along with a mound of dirt and a fence - in what is supposed to be a very dark Atlantic Ocean - details that are so clearly visible which the DVD cannot pick up!
Amazing detail!!!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A restoration to Remember, 22 Mar 2012
By 
R. Shore (Belfast, Northern Ireland) - See all my reviews
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Simply put, one of the finest Restorations of a film I've ever seen. Stunning picture and sound. Jaw dropping, any superlative you want just doesn't do justice to what you are watching. ITV studio score a bullseye again with this blu-ray release. Ironically enough one of Roy Ward Baker's other classics got the same deluxe treatment. "Quatermass and the Pit".
Anyone wanting to see how restoration should be done should pick up either of these two classics.

Roger
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Iceberg.Dead ahead sir!", 20 Nov 2008
By 
Mr. A. Whiteside "tonyjackie3" (uk) - See all my reviews
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Without question,'A Night To Remember' is the finest film ever made about the Titanic disaster.I know that the overblown 'Titanic' won a record number of awards,but it pales in comparison to this fine movie.

We all know the story by now.Over 1500 lives lost and many lessons learned.This movie has an almost documentary feel to it and the fact that it was filmed in black and white somehow adds to the atmosphere.It is moving,filled with tension and features people that you actually care about.Directed with realism by Roy Ward Baker and very well acted this really is a first rate effort.

There are quite a few very interesting extras with this DVD so it is extremely highly recommended.Probably one of the finest British movies of the last 50 years.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blu-ray review, 19 Mar 2012
By 
Andy_128 (Renfrewshire, Scotland) - See all my reviews
I just received the Blu-ray version of this film today (19th March '12) which is also the GB release date of this Blu-ray.

The transfer to Blu-ray is great; it looks like they have went back to the master film to produce this. Superb fine detail and lighting. This is the first black and white Blu-ray I've watched.

Sound wise, the mono soundtrack is un-compressed here and I did notice it was quite a bit better than the DVD version.

I think I first viewed this film on Ch4 in Britain around 1988, which was a 4:3 cropped version.

This Blu-ray version of the film is more or less 1:85:1 (it is actually 1:66:1) there is a very small black vertical border on each side of the screen.

The extras that are on the original DVD look better on this Blu-ray with a few new extras added. I pre-ordered this disc via Amazon Prime a few days before the Blu-ray release date and it was delivered on the release date.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The classic Titanic film, but beware..., 19 Oct 2010
A Night to Remember is *the* Titanic film. The true story and nothing but. This release also includes an excellent documentary about the making of the film which has behind-the-scenes home movies shot by the producer, Willam MacQuitty.

Unfortunately Carlton have released the film itself in 'widescreen' at a ratio of 1.33:1. The film was shot in the standard screen ratio 4:3 and the widescreen effect has been achieved by cropping the top and bottom of the frame. This has the effect, for example, of losing the top of Michael Goodliffe's head and his hurried calculation of how long the ship will survive in his notebook.

I confess to being a complete anorak when it comes to the Titanic, but I love this film and I think Roy Baker and Geoffrey Unsworth went to a lot of trouble to compose each shot for maximum impact. To see the film vandalised like this just to create a trendy effect for DVD release is very disappointing.
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