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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Men in the Iron Masks
An ancient adventure that rose from its Tomb, a birthday party and an art-deco whodunit - this collection has three great stories, all with metal-faced adversaries but so different when you lift their masks.

If you don't have the earlier individual releases this set is an essential buy. If you do have them already - the quality of the newly reprocessed `Tomb of...
Published 14 months ago by Number13

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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Nice upgrade, but not that "Special".
I bought this because a marketplace seller was offering a significant discount on the usual price of the set and I have been impressed by the extra work done on previous "Special Editions" of the serials.

With this set the Restoration Team have made dramatic improvements in the picture quality of The Robots of Death - which has been given a proper conversion...
Published on 9 Dec. 2012 by Philip Quinton


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5.0 out of 5 stars It's a classic!, 30 Oct. 2013
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This review is from: Doctor Who Revisitations 3 (The Tomb of the Cybermen/The Three Doctors/The Robots of Death) [DVD] (DVD)
Great to see these wonderful old Dr Who series again, and to enjoy some of the earlier Doctors again. A wonderful touch of nostalgia!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Doctor Who Revisitations 3, 10 Aug. 2013
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J. A. Bradford "JAB review" (Sussex England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who Revisitations 3 (The Tomb of the Cybermen/The Three Doctors/The Robots of Death) [DVD] (DVD)
A great collection from a great era of the BBC! the revisitation concept is a great idea, with the addition of further extras very welcome, as well as improvements elsewhere in the collection! A great purchase for Doctor Who fans!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Scrubbed up nicely, 10 Aug. 2013
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This review is from: Doctor Who Revisitations 3 (The Tomb of the Cybermen/The Three Doctors/The Robots of Death) [DVD] (DVD)
Three tales that have never looked better, plus an invigorating array of new extras. Worth splashing out for, if you can offload your older copies.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 29 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: Doctor Who Revisitations 3 (The Tomb of the Cybermen/The Three Doctors/The Robots of Death) [DVD] (DVD)
Superb stories with ace special features at a reasonable price
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent. You really do revisit these Classic Who stories, 5 Nov. 2014
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Gareth Morgan - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who Revisitations 3 (The Tomb of the Cybermen/The Three Doctors/The Robots of Death) [DVD] (DVD)
Excellent. You really do revisit these Classic Who stories.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The strongest of the Revisitations collections so far!, 27 Feb. 2012
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This review is from: Doctor Who Revisitations 3 (The Tomb of the Cybermen/The Three Doctors/The Robots of Death) [DVD] (DVD)
So we have reached the third and final Revisitations set from the Doctor Who Revisitations Team. After the second collection, in my personal opinion, being rather lacklustre in terms of the stories chosen, this has gone out on a high with three incredibly strong and popular stories. Although a few will disagree again with the choices, particularly from the point of view of the extras on the original DVDs, I have only owned The Three Doctors before (which I've now traded for the new edition) so all three are hugely welcome to my own personal collection.

The first story is the 1967 classic The Tomb of the Cybermen starring Patrick Troughton. It's sad that the few complete Troughton stories held by the BBC archives are mostly clunkers but this definitely isn't one of them. Without going into too much detail about the plot which will already be familiar to fans, this is a shining example from the black-and-white era of the programme of good, imaginative writing, strong acting and direction winning over a paltry budget. Patrick Troughton himself is at the top of his game as The Doctor - his seemingly-whimsical and mischievous nature masking great intelligence, cunning and authority as he thwarts his enemies without resorting to the vocal histrionics of McCoy or Tennant for instance. A scene between Deborah Watling's Victoria and The Doctor about family is well-acted and emotional without being over-sentimental. The various members of the archaeological expedition are well-played even if their slightly-combative relationships don't get enough time to develop after the first episode and it's refreshing to see a multi-cultural unit portrayed in 1960s Who. The two main villains of Klieg and Kaftan become slightly pantomime at times although that isn't a great issue amongst the well-portrayed, over-the-top villains throughout the history of Who. Their motivation for trying to control the Cybermen however isn't as well explored as it should be (Nazism-overtones?). The Cybermen themselves are suitably menacing with their cold, electronic voices and generally pose a threat in this story compared to some of their later appearances in the 80s and NuWho. It's also interesting to note how many of the additions to Cyber-lore e.g. the introduction of a Cybercontroller and their dependence on cold storage have remained to this day. The story itself is tightly-paced and fast-moving, a real contrast to many of the lumbering six-parters around it of the same era. Design-wise, the serial looks fantastic, giving some real sense of scale to the tomb complex on a limited budget and both through a combination of this and Morris Barry's direction, a fully believable alien world and atmosphere has been realised.
In terms of special features, the majority of those on the original 2002 release have been ported over, although the footage from the 1992 "Tombwatch" event has surprisingly not been included in this. However, we do get some excellent new features, which improves the package as a whole from its rather scant original release. These include the now-mandatory (but always interesting) behind the scenes/reflection documentary with cast and crew, "The Lost Giants", "Cybermen - an Extended Edition", originally seen on the "Attack of the Cybermen" DVD, but now with links by Matthew Sweet and material from the new series included and "The Curse of the Cybermen's Tomb" which explores the Egyptian influences on the story.

Moving on just over 5 years later and the series was celebrating its tenth anniversary with "The Three Doctors" with Troughton and William Hartnell reprising their roles alongside Jon Pertwee's Third Doctor to take on the renegade Time Lord Omega, in his first appearance. I would say that the story has not aged as well as the other two included in the box-set. This doesn't make it any less enjoyable but the lack of budget really shows on this story with the tinsel, fairy-lit anti-matter universe of Omega and his bubble-wrap Gel Guards. Bob Baker and Dave Martin certainly have imagination but The Three Doctors is just one of those times in the classic series that there was a real disjoint between what was intended and what could actually be portrayed with limited time and money.
That's not to say there isn't much to enjoy. Troughton slips effortlessly back into character and the antagonistic, rivalry between the Second and Third Doctors (stemming from real-life conflict between Troughton and Pertwee) is incredibly amusing. Hartnell, due to ill health, is relegated to a cameo as the First Doctor but certainly makes the most with his limited screen-time cutting his two successors down to size. Despite the focus on the Doctors, the UNIT family of the Brigadier, Benton and Jo Grant are very much involved in the action although Stephen Thorne's Omega is perhaps too over-the-top with a performance more suited to the theatre or radio. The storyline itself is slightly hokey and non-sensical and the direction, at times, flat and uninteresting, but this is one of those Who stories, that whilst not really a classic, is just enormous fun to watch without taking it too seriously.
Again a number of extras from the 2003 release have been included although once more, footage from an actual event (this time Panopticon 93) has not made it across to the special edition. In terms of new features, we get "Happy Birthday to Who", which takes a look at the making of the story with much humorously being made of the relationship between Troughton and Pertwee. "Girls, Girls, Girls - The 1970s" follows up the excellent 1980s feature on the "Paradise Towers" DVD, with former companions Caroline John, Katy Manning and Louise Jameson reflecting together on their roles in Doctor Who as well as the influence of feminism at the time and is incredibly insightful whilst "Was Doctor Who Rubbish?', where fans defend the classic series against comparisons to the new series, caused a cheer from me as I completely agreed with much of what was said. In terms of special features,"The Three Doctors" is by far the strongest.

The final story is 1977's "The Robots of Death", also the first proper Who DVD release way back in 2000 (discounting the original "The Five Doctors" release the year before). Given how scant special features were back then, its re-release is pretty welcome. This story falls towards the end of the acclaimed Hinchcliffe/Holmes era of the programme and for me, it's one of the strongest of that era, a rather ingenious take on the Agatha Christie, Whodunnit, type murder-mysteries with shades of Isaac Asimov thrown in for good measure.
It's amazing how well this show stands up today. A strong script from Chris Boucher is backed up a very strong, (and like "Tomb") ethnic cast with real relationship dynamics established between the various crew-members of the Sandminer through lots of personal jokes and jibes at each other's expense and an atmosphere of greed and lust for material wealth hanging over the world that's been created. The robots themselves, whilst not exactly frightening, are an interesting addition to the roll-call of Who monsters and even if the real villain behind their murderous rampage is all too obvious from early on in the story, it's certainly an interesting take on the whole robot angle. Tom Baker is still very much in his darker persona as the Fourth Doctor (although that would soon evaporate with the departure of Hinchcliffe and Holmes) but with the usual flashes of a wicked sense of humour we expect. His confrontations with Russell Hunter's Uvanov are a real treat to watch. Louise Jameson also settles in well to the role of Leela and it's refreshing to see a companion who is more physical and less reliant on the Doctor than had been seen up to that point (skimpy leathers aside). The art-deco designs of the robots and the Sandminer also make a change to the white, over-lit visions of the future we have previously seen in the programme.
In terms of special features, we get two new documentaries with another recollection "The Sandmine Murders" and also "Robophobia" with Toby Hadoke looking at the various robot appearances in Who. It's probably the weakest in terms of the new features, but they are by no means less interesting.

Each story also has the usual commentaries, information subtitles, photo galleries and continuity trailers included. Audio and picture quality is very strong, especially with the new VID-Fire restored "Tomb" looking pretty crisp and as it did on original transmission. The only problems I did notice were some obvious lines in the film sequences on "The Three Doctors" but that's a minor quibble.
Overall, I would highly recommend this package, if like me, you don't own the original versions. Those who do may balk at shelling out just for some additional features but it's by far the strongest of the three Revisitations in terms of story and extras-quality.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Addition to a Collection, 8 Dec. 2013
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This review is from: Doctor Who Revisitations 3 (The Tomb of the Cybermen/The Three Doctors/The Robots of Death) [DVD] (DVD)
Addition to my collection and a worthy addition, too. A chance to relive the old Doctors in the 50th year.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Now that's what I call Who 3", 12 Dec. 2012
This review is from: Doctor Who Revisitations 3 (The Tomb of the Cybermen/The Three Doctors/The Robots of Death) [DVD] (DVD)
Briefly on the stories themselves as I reviewed them for the original release of each in some detail;
Tomb of the Cybermen is arguably the best Cyberman story yet done taking into account what was achievable at the time it was done. They story is a wonderful mix of the discovery of ancient tombs with SF and restricts the metal men's screentime (as the best Cyber tales do) . It has a slighty darker reading of the 2nd Doctor , meddling in things and causing much that happens albeit indirectly. A good cast and the time is used well. With a little respect for its age, mistakes such as a visible kirby wire and obvious dummy in a cybersuit will not detract from the enjoyment.
The Three Doctor was the 1st multi-Doctor story and its plot is simple-renegade timelord Omega wants revenge for being abandoned. The timelords send the 3rd Dr his previous selves for help. Hartnell's poor health at the time meant he could only be in pre-filmed inserts on a screen but for all that it's good to have him involved & the 2nd & 3rd Docs work together nicely. A fun christmas special type of story (although it was actually not screened at xmas).
The Robots of Death is Agatha Christie in Space as robot servants start bumping off their masters. As Steven Moffat once observed titles like Robots of Death compromise the whodunnit status of a story but it's who's behind the robots that is the mystery. A great story.
Now then onto the additional extras. I'm not sure if Robots and Three had additional remastering but Tomb is now in glorious vidfire and looks all the better for it. A feature replacing the original restoration feature fills us in on the process. Frazer Hines and Deborah watling's enjoyable but slightly dry commentary is joined by a new 1 with The Moderator Toby Hadoke who has recalled them with many others including villainess Shirley Cooklin, good guys Clive Merrison & Bernard Holley and Cyber men Reg Whitehead. Reg is great informing us he was the 1st Cyberman in Tenth Planet and pleaded to be allowed to play a Yeti later. A much better commentary although the Moderator makes a slip up. He berates the contemporary Radio Times for showing Cybermen on the Cover spoiling their appearance in the show. Look at the story title Toby!
The original making of-a panel at the 1st public screening after it was rediscovered (of special interest as some participants are no longer with us) is joined by a newly shot making of with Cooklin, Victor Pemberton and many more and it's very well made.
Other new features include Matthew Sweet looking at the history of the Cybermen including New Who stories.Good but probably more interesting for fans with lower levels of anorak knowledge.
A welcome feature see such distinguished names as Christopher frayling considering how much of the story came from the diccovery of Tutankhamen, death to many entering the tomb, cybermats as scarabs, A nicely made feature.
Original features;, the reconstructed climax of Evil of the Daleks, title sequence test fotage and effects feature on Late Night Line Up are retained along with easter egg audio trailer for Abominable Snowmen which now plays over the episode selection.

Three Doctors keeps its Katy commentary which is great, Miss Manning on form. It also still has defunct broadcaster BSB's Dr Who Weekend footage and 30th Anniversary Convention footage with Jon Pertwee, Nicolas Courtney and others plus some contemporary Blue Peter footage.
Happy Birthday to Who looks at the making of the 10th anniversary story utilising new footage of Terrance Dicks, writer Bob Baker etc and cleverly culled archive footage of Barry Letts. The story's development, Hartnell's health problems and clashes between Pertwee & Troughton make for an enjoyable behind the scenes story.
Girls, Girls Girls is a welcome chat with some 70's Who girls. Sadly made too late to be able to involve the late Elisabeth Sladen but fortunately early enough for The late Caroline John to engage in an entertaining chat with Katy Manning & Louise Jamieson.
Was Dr Who Rubbish? is a feature that meanders and doesn't work well.

If you only own the original Robots, this will be a very tempting purchase as Robots benefits the most from the revamp. We still have untreated voice sequence of one of the robots, which still doesn't sound that different.
The interesting but dry original commentary from producer Philip Hinchcliffe and writer Chris Boucher is joined by a Tommentary. Good old Uncle Tom gets to play with Louise J director Michael Briant and Pamela Salem. He's on top form and regales us with how intakes of breath when he worked in a play with a young Pamela salem due to her beauty, sucked all the oxygen offstage, why changing a line to namecheck Jon Pertwee in a stage tour of Arsenic & Old Lace lead to a telling off and how he met Bill Hartnell's daughter in the supermarket!
The Sandmine Murders is a very well put together making of with Briant, Hinchcliffe and much of the cast. Salem tells of an old woman living near her who wears what looks like Toos' head dress!
As regular readers of my reviews will know, I'm not convinced that there is untapped comedic gold in most of the "funny" features produced but "Robophobia" works. Toby Hadoke's tone hits the spot, informing us why Daleks don't count etc. and it's a little gem of a feature. Not sure but the Chumbley clip may just be from the recently recovered episode of Galaxy 4. Please confirm or correct in comments, if you know.

Some great new features on stories with wide appeal.

For anyone who's interested other upcoming special editions are set to include; Ark in Space, The Aztecs (you have to buy it to get the Galaxy 4 ep) and Inferno. rumours abound that the Two Doctors may also get the treatment.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 21 Aug. 2014
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This review is from: Doctor Who Revisitations 3 (The Tomb of the Cybermen/The Three Doctors/The Robots of Death) [DVD] (DVD)
grandson delighted with this dvd
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Big & Bold, 14 April 2012
This review is from: Doctor Who Revisitations 3 (The Tomb of the Cybermen/The Three Doctors/The Robots of Death) [DVD] (DVD)
We are spoiled as Doctor Who fans. Our shows are released to DVD not as bald and bland releases featuring just the headline content, but fans like us - and they are like us - add and moderate commentaries voiced by significant members of the production, information text, interviews, reviews, additional .pdf content and features to each and every release. I am so used to this wealth of material that when I watch other, less feature-rich DVDs, I feel a little cheated.

The Revisitations series keep up this fine tradition of content and supporting material with each release by re-examining earlier DVD releases and re-issuing them with new content and improved quality. This is NOT the same as the Star Wars Trilogy being endlessly re-cycled: in the Revisitations series, the main content picture and sound quality is buffed up and there is significant extra value added to the releases.

If you don't have these stories already, buy them here and in the other Revisitations boxed sets. If *DO* you have them already - well, you're probably already a fan, and wait for the price to come down before buying them. Maybe then offer your original copies to other, newer fans who may not have seen the stories yet or not own them?

Do you think you're being stiffed by 2|entertain and the Restoration Team? You're not. Warmly recommended.
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