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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking
Whilst on the surface Hoolifan can be seen as a romp through the decades with a football mob it is undoubtedly an important social document. The psychology of young men and gangs is intentionally or unintentionally laid bare as is the social framework they operate under. Searching questions are raised over the institutionalisation of football and policing and...
Published on 9 Sep 1999

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One for the 'Loaded' readers.
Another cash-in on the late 90's postmodern 'lad-culture'. Written in the style of how a 15 year old might describe his weekend, always the 'noble hero', full of unnecessary embellishments (and cultural inaccuracies), heavy on the fantasy...talk about self-eulogizing. Image first, facts second. If you want believable pain, read Steve Cowens book on The Blades.
Published on 20 July 2001


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One for the 'Loaded' readers., 20 July 2001
By A Customer
Another cash-in on the late 90's postmodern 'lad-culture'. Written in the style of how a 15 year old might describe his weekend, always the 'noble hero', full of unnecessary embellishments (and cultural inaccuracies), heavy on the fantasy...talk about self-eulogizing. Image first, facts second. If you want believable pain, read Steve Cowens book on The Blades.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 22 Oct 1999
By A Customer
After all the reviews posted on this site, I though I'd give this book a read but I have to say it was a let down. If there's any humour in here, I didn't find it and it was also hard to work out which of the two authors was actually writing which part. Definately too confusing to be taken seriously and certainly not the masterpiece some of the people on here think it is.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars DO WE REALLY NEED ANOTHER HOOLIGAN DIARY?, 13 Jun 1999
By A Customer
ON THE WHOLE THE BOOK WAS A FAIRLY ENJOYABLE READ BUT ONE THING DID ANNOY ME,THE AUTHOR MOANED ABOUT THE HEAVY POLICE PRESENCE AT A MILLWALL GAME AND THE FACT THAT HE WAS BEING VIDEOTAPED.HE COMPLAINED TO A SENIOR POLICE OFFICER POINTING OUT THAT THERE HAD BEEN NO TROUBLE,WELL SURELY BY HAVING A LARGE POLICE PRECENCE AND THE POWER OF VIDEOTAPE THIS WAS THE REASON FOR NO SERIOUS TROUBLE!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking, 9 Sep 1999
By A Customer
Whilst on the surface Hoolifan can be seen as a romp through the decades with a football mob it is undoubtedly an important social document. The psychology of young men and gangs is intentionally or unintentionally laid bare as is the social framework they operate under. Searching questions are raised over the institutionalisation of football and policing and society's attitude towards violence generally.
An entertaining and often comedic read from many angles and my only criticism is: have the authors allowed some very lateral and compelling thoughts to become obscured among the action, dialogue and event driven prose that drives the book?
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Terrace Culture Remembered, 20 Feb 2002
By 
Hugh Jenkins (Perth, Australia (originally Wales)) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Anyone who went to football matches in the eighties will find this book brings memories flooding back. It made me realise that I'd forgotten so much about those days, and perhaps highlights just how mcuh football has moved on (or at least I have).
The book doesn't attempt to moralise on the subject of hooliganism and there's no remorse on the part of the author for his actions. In fact, he appears to take blatant pride in his violent activities and you'd be led to believe that no innocents were victims of his actions.
I suppose the author should be commended for his forthrightness and honesty, but it would be nice if the author could have shown some belief that the world's a better place without the sort of character he was.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Working-class classic, 7 Sep 1999
By A Customer
Hoolifan is a working-class classic up there with 'Saturday Night, Sunday Morning or The Football Factory. The author evokes a South London working-class childhood with great feeling and detail and takes the reader step by step through the seductive process of transformation from rattel-waving boy to aggressive football thug. The authenticity is electric and here for the first time a work that strips away the myths, presumptions and lies that surround the subject, allowing the reader to form their own conclusions.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant book, 10 Feb 2000
By A Customer
Hoolifan is a superb book, and not just from a hooligan point of view either. In many ways it captures an era of football that has past, but brings it to life so vividly you could be forgiven for thinking you were standing shoulder to shoulder with King in the midst of Chelsea's boys. My only complaint is that once I started reading it, I had to finish it, which meant the work I should have been doing was put on the back burner.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down!, 1 Feb 2001
By A Customer
Nestolgic trip back into the reality of being around the terraces in the mid to late seventies for me. An old Forest fan from that era, (when they were good)!. If you lived it you can relate, if you didn't , you can't. It's that simple. Even though I'm a six figure earner now,the authors conclusion was profond relative to his comments about maybee not being proud today of yesterdays antic's , but at that time, boy we had fun
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5.0 out of 5 stars authentic, 7 July 1999
By A Customer
this is one of the best books on the subject of football hooliganism. it is up with "the footbal factory"by john king and whereas the latter is fiction this is fact.AS A forty something and a former member of manchester uniteds red army it brought back lots of memories of the eras talked about in the book. highly recommended especially to 35-45year olds!!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Honest, Entertaining and realistic, 2 Dec 2008
By 
N. Lammond "neil" (netherlands) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
As a Chelsea fan since the mid 70s I bought this book out of curiosity regarding which games would be talked about and what incidents etc!

Now having attended many games over the years on an occasional (5 to 10 a season)basis I have seen many things and soaked up the atmosphere without ever being seriously involved in the trouble. However this book really brought it all back, the apprehension of going to places like the Den and Upton Park and being nervous as you never quite knew what would happen on the way to and from the match etc.

It reeally brings back the feel of the 70s and 80s pre Super sunday and the sanitised premiership. When football was about going to the match with your mates and getting up to/ shouting a few things that you wouldn't want your mum to know about. The fashions of the day are also discussed (skins casuals etc) along with the terrace culture of the times which accurately goes from the massed 70s chasing across the terraces to the motre sinister mid 80s when weapons started becoming more frequent and the violence increased.

I think that it is also pretty honest, for instance the author talks about getting hidings or biting off more than they could chew as well as the expected takings of ends etc. As someone who went to some of the matches mentioned and knew some of the faces talked about if only by sight/reputation it's a great read. You feel like you really know the guys (without the danger I might add)even though at the time I would have been too young and as much use as a chocolate tea pot.

Thoroughly recommend it for Chelsea fans old and new anyone who used to discuss who ran who in a 70s/80s playground and those curious about football culture 'back in the day'. I could read it over and over.
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