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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars MoPai Insight
The author was the first westerner to be admitted as a student of John Chang. whilst this is by no means a 'how to' book it contains a wealth of first hand insight into how John Chang dealt with Mr. McMillan. In Chapter 8 (29% on Kindle) Mr McMillan in reference to the specific content of his training says (I am unable to divulge any specifics). However along the way in...
Published on 9 Nov. 2012 by Pete Keeffe

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1.0 out of 5 stars Great potential but fails to deliver
From the start of the book, it becomes apparent that the Author is not a naturally gifted writer. The text is riddled with spelling mistakes, terrible sentence structure and grammatical inaccuracies.

Towards the beginning of the book it is so bad it is like reading Forest Gump's diary!

If you are looking for any training information on Nai Gung you...
Published 4 months ago by Quillion


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars MoPai Insight, 9 Nov. 2012
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This review is from: Seeking the Master of Mo Pai: Adventures with John Chang (Kindle Edition)
The author was the first westerner to be admitted as a student of John Chang. whilst this is by no means a 'how to' book it contains a wealth of first hand insight into how John Chang dealt with Mr. McMillan. In Chapter 8 (29% on Kindle) Mr McMillan in reference to the specific content of his training says (I am unable to divulge any specifics). However along the way in this engagingly anecdotal work which spans a timescale from the late 1980s until 2011 it is possible to pick up one or two pointers towards what MoPai training at the beginner levels actually consisted of for Mr McMillan and very rigorous and time consuming it sounds. Mention is made of two other western students who were accepted after Mr McMillan, one Greek presumably Kosta Danaos who wrote the book The Magus of Java and an Australian chap referred to as 'Dicky'. It would appear that these three did not necessarily get on as well together as one may have hoped. Mr. McMillan is a Christian so his views on the spiritualistic aspects of John Chang's MoPai school (the grandmaster was a spirit guide with whom John Chang communicated) are what one would expect. All spirits are 'demons' according to the author, that said he does describe two encounters he personally c.aims to have had with 'spirits'. Mr. McMillan writes from the heart and perhaps wears his heart upon his sleeve at times but this book is possibly destined to become a set text for anyone interested in unentangling something of the enigma that is MoPai as currently presented to a western audience by the several and often conflicting 'authorities' on the form.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting book from a pioneer., 25 July 2012
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This review is from: Seeking the Master of Mo Pai: Adventures with John Chang (Kindle Edition)
I really enjoyed this book. It is written by a western pioneer in Mo Pai Nei Kung which makes this a unique book. There are some typos in the book and the text could be more concise in places. It is a very honest account of the authors experiences which I appreciate. The authors religious views are evident in the text and it's refreshing to have someone being honest about their views. For any critics about the book from armchair neikung experts I would like to remind them that this is the man who crossed the ocean and in a land he did not know, with a language he didn't speak, he found a teacher and did what very few people could do. This is a book about his experiences and for those who wish to pursue Nei Kung there are the authors views about the other books that have been published which is very interesting.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Great potential but fails to deliver, 8 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: Seeking the Master of Mo Pai: Adventures with John Chang (Kindle Edition)
From the start of the book, it becomes apparent that the Author is not a naturally gifted writer. The text is riddled with spelling mistakes, terrible sentence structure and grammatical inaccuracies.

Towards the beginning of the book it is so bad it is like reading Forest Gump's diary!

If you are looking for any training information on Nai Gung you will be disappointed as there is no detail given.

The author would have probably produced a reasonable book if he had just stuck to travel stories and anecdotes of his training with Pak John.

Sadly the Author is extremely critical and judgemental about almost everyone he encounters. Indonesians (borders on racism) the other students, other Chi Kung practitioners and systems etc etc.

It wouldn't be so bad if he had an informed opinion and qualified his comments, but this does not happen.

The Author makes sweeping statements about every subject, such as...

"My research shows....." What research?
"A Chi Gung master once told me...." Who? Where? When?

Some of the authors opinions are so extreme and deluded it throws all the rest of the book in to question. For example his rants about Mormons. His claim that it used to be normal for close relatives to interbreed and produce offspring with no genetic defects ! His claims about the Ninja using Dim Mak etc.

I am sure I won't be able to dissuade the Mo Pai fans from reading this, but if your interest in Internal Arts is more general, I wouldn't bother with this. There are far better books out there.
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3.0 out of 5 stars a bit dissappointing..., 30 Dec. 2012
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I read Kostas book "Maggus of Java" and also are following similar tradition and of course are interested in any information about it. So I welcomed a book that would hopefully present diffrent point of view and other information on Nei Kung.
In reality I was a bit dissapointed. There are some good elements in that book as well as not needed/boring ones.
In particular author was expressing his christian belief too often ,which is irrelevant In my opinion to his practise. if he had used those pages (the ones he present his theological thoughts) on more information about neikung I would be delighted.
The other not really needed thing is his tourist guide like description of places he visited. It is nice to know that Balianese girls are pretty and whole island as well but it was distracting from main topic of this book.

Good things are located on pages describing neikung system itself, his experiences and everything related to neikung. I also found quite interesting to read about his research on other energy arts.

In general this book is filling his desire to express somewhere his sadness after loosing his teacher and his grief about whole situation in mo pai school.

Kostas book is better reading from point of view of armchaired taoists:) if you haven't read Maggus of Java then two stars is a rate
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3.0 out of 5 stars insightful but at the same time overly personal, 7 Jun. 2013
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This review is from: Seeking the Master of Mo Pai: Adventures with John Chang (Kindle Edition)
i found some of the information about the book very insightful about the lineague the experience of chi(prana) but apart from that the book felt like alot of complaining about his master other practitionors also despite his years of training he still talked in a dogmatic way especially when he said you cant believe in enlightenent and jesus at the same time , when it was evident Jesus was one of the greatest meditators in history , thy eye be single is a reference to the third eye .
i do admire his tenacity to practice hard as i do a simular system of a yogic background and i can concur it takes the discipline of the highest order , i have done martial arts and they dont compare to the will needed to do these ancient internal disciplines .
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Buy it, Read it, Bin it., 26 April 2012
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My opinion is this: From this book the author appears to have two virtues: He appreciates beauty, and he is prepared to be honest about himself (as far as we can tell). Unfortunately those who are interested in "John Chang" should read this book. The amount of useful information is minute, and perhaps the most useful is a single sentence of what the first stages of Mo Pai are not (also pages 139-146 and 152 have some virtue.) The worst aspect of the book is born from the fact the author has been profoundly brainwashed into Christian thought, his preaching within the text demonstrates the depth of his ignorance which is desperately sad - 'You can take a horse to water....' and all that. The irony and the tragedy for Jim McMillan is that until he completely graduates Christianity and leaves it in the spiritual Kindergarten where it belongs he will never develop any real "Supernormal" abilities of note, his subconscious mind will simply not permit it. He is only three steps from enlightenment, but it may as well be three light years. I recommend you buy the book though, read it once, then dispose of it. Unless the reader can retain an attitude of objective detachment parts of the text may make some readers extremely angry.
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