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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on 20 March 2010
A thoroughly enjoyable rip-roaring read.I have read a number of Cussler novels,some better than others,I had some concerns regarding Cussler co-writing with other authors, but his collaboration with Jack Du Bruhl works very well.
Four brothers embark on an adventure to Pine Island in search of Pirate treasure buried in a deep shaft,little knowing of the tragedy about to unfold. A scientist at a research station in the freezing Antartic is driven to madness. Juan Cabrillo and his team from the "Oregon",search the South American Jungle for a missing satellite,make an interesting find, get involved with a Psychopathic Argentinian and his Special Forces team.An ancient Chinese seagoing expedition.Argentinian and Chinese cooperation also feature. Lots of action, death and destruction. Three stories intrinsically linked which keeps the reader engrossed all the way through. If you enjoy Adventure,escapism and a good read,I can recommend this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 26 October 2012
I have read several Cussler books and always find them enjoyable. This was, too, but the paperback edition I read (same cover as the Amazon entry here) was unfortunately spoiled by several errors. There must have been around 20 small mistakes, such as "he lead them to the car" and "her hair fell passed her shoulders" but there were at least 2 glaring mistakes. One sentence says that "the four older brothers were so similar they could have passed for quintuplets". Last time I looked, quins were 5, not 4. Then the usually meticulous research of Cussler lets him down badly. He mentions the Maldives, "known by the British as the Falkland Islands". Er, no. Sorry. That would be Malvinas. the Maldives are somewhere else entirely. Maybe I am nitpicking, but I do think a writer of Cussler's reputation should make sure these things are correct. The co-writer, De Brul, may be the one responsible, but Cussler's name is on the cover in large letters. This book would have received 5 stars from me, but the errors are just too noticeable to ignore. Hopefully, in other editions, they have been corrected.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 15 July 2012
Another Oregon Files adventure by Messrs Cussler/Du Brul.
The "company" battle a ruthless Argentine junta to retrieve a NASA payload, then confront them in Antarctica.
A little geographical confusion.P.20 "forced-labor camps deep into the Amazon" P.28 "About a hundred miles south of Paraguay in some of the thickest jungle of the Amazon".p.50 "labor camps here in the Amazon".P.70 "deep in the Amazonian region of his country". Neither Argentina nor Paraguay share the Amazon Basin.You would need to travel 400 miles north into Bolivia to encounter it.

P305 "when Argentina invaded the Maldives in 1982". Malvinas meant, probably a typesetting error.
P215 places most research bases on the other side of Antarctica.I believe half are concentrated on the Antarctic Peninsula.

Another good read and highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 27 March 2010
Wholeheartedly recommend this! The whole Oregon series written in conjunction with Jack du Brul are all very good reads; certainly the best of his current releases along with the Isaac Bell series with Justin Scott. Juan Cabrillo's 'The Corporation' again making the world a better place to live by virtue of battling with Argentine forces in Antarctica wanting to claim an oil & gas-rich peninsula as their own with Chinese backing. There are multiple plots all interweaving to make for a very entertaining story. Spotted an error though: Cussler/du Brul refer to the Falkland Islands as the Maldives when in fact the correct term used by the Argentines is the (Islas) Malvinas - the Maldives are in the Indian Ocean!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 13 March 2012
This is a good book for a holiday read. Covers a lot of ground in a fairly fast-paced fashion. James Bond style - ie no one could be that lucky / physically perfect etc. But story has enough interest to keep you going to the end.
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on 16 February 2014
What spoilt this book for me was the sloppy editing. If you’re buying a self-published book for 99p off Kindle you might expect a few typos – but if you’re paying rrp £18.99 for a first edition hardback, you expect quality and professionalism. You can barely go 8 pages without a typo – some of them glaring. And not just the editing – the authors made one or two real clangers themselves. Try this for size: (p75)
‘…converging on a levelled-off section of hillside at least two acres across….’
That’s like saying ‘I trod in a puddle that was six gallons deep.’
At another point it became evident that much of the story had been dictated, as a similar sounding word but of completely different and irrelevant meaning had been inserted. Overall the quality of editing gave me the impression of a rushed production.
The story: Usual Cussler production line. Entertaining, plenty of action, technically plausible, but variation on the same old theme. Something gets lost a long time ago; clues lead to its rediscovery today; good guys chase bad guys to find it first; confrontation; good guys win. All very predictable.
Don’t get me wrong – I like Clive Cussler novels. They’re pure escapism and if you don’t mind reading the same plot over and over, with just the settings and some of the characters changed, they’re good fun. However, the sloppy editing in this one spoilt it for me, and for that I give it a 2 star rating.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 7 December 2013
Clive Cussler writes (sometimes in collaboration with others) some of the best Fantasy/Adventure stories ever. I am not going to describe the plot but if you have read Cussler before you will know what to expect. Brilliant!
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on 15 July 2013
I've read most, if not all of the Oregon files and they are gradually getting more and more far fetched. I've read Clive Cussler since I was about 15yrs old, I'm over 50 now! I was getting bored with the Dirk Pitt novels and was happy to start on the Oregon files, I not so sure I'm getting a bit bored with these as well now. Don't get me wrong this was an exciting and easy read and great escapism, but it's getting harder and harder to work out if I've read it before or not, the locations vary but the plots are all very similar. Saying that I'll be reading the next one in the series and probably a few more after that...
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on 15 May 2012
Clive Cussler and especially the Oregan series are my favourite reads. Whilst the format remains constant, the endings are never predictable. This one was a cliff hanger to the last page and then some. How this guy keeps coming up with such variations on a theme I have no idea but nobody is more pleased that he does than me. Once I finally have every book he has written I am going to start all over again. I will never tire of his works. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED to everyone who enjoys a good adventure novel.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 30 May 2010
... but only if you don't want a slam bang rip roaring adventure with lots of blood and guts.
Myself, I prefer Cussler's wild, wonderful and often wacky plotlines and in this book it seems as if the plot started off as a story from the 'NUMA Files' and got hijacked halfway.
The premise is that Argentina has been taken over by a right-wing neo-Nazi junta and an American rocket has just crashed over their border. The Chairman and his crew go hunting for it and, in the process fall over the gondola of a crashed airship, inside of which is the sheleton of the pilot and some papers carefully left on a table. The team decide to take the papers back to their family and are almost killed by an Argentinian Death Squad. From there on, the Chairman and his crew are involved in a desperate effort to stop Argentina annexing Antartica.
We never hear what happened to the passenger(s) on the airship and although the 'Silent Sea' is pivotal to the story, we are told very little about the discovery itself. So,yes, I was disappointed, ...
but what really spoiled the book for me was the comment that, in the past, Argentina had invaded the Maldive Islands. It did? When? What use would a bunch of islands in the north-west of the Indian Ocean be to Argentina? Oh-oh, seems to be a classic example of 'Spellchecker Error'.
People who write a lot ought to be more aware that SPELLCHECKERS LIE. They do so frequently and often and one of the ways in which they do so, is to replace words that they don't know with words that they do. This is a mistake which I don't even think that the authors made, but if they did, the Editor should have caught it.
If nobody could spell 'Malvinas', write 'the Falkland Islands' for heaven's sake, not leave a howler that even a schoolboy would be ashamed to make!
Later:
There's also an annoying anachronism in the plot. 'Silent Sea' herself is said to have sailed in 1495. Couldn't have happened. After the Chinese admiral Zheng He returned from his last voyage, he found a new Emperor on the throne, one who wasn't in the least interested in foreign lands and who wanted the Chinese to stay in China. As a result, the shipyards which built the great sea-going junks were closed down, a great swathe of coastline was made a no-go area and deep sea travel was forbidden. All this happened between 1425 and 1435 - so no Chinese would have been sailing a great junk in 1495, because by then, nno one would have been able (or allowed) to do so.
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