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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A different setting for a zombie film, but it works
This film is fine and has a strong and commanding lead role by Andre Morell. It's a good story, is well put together, and interestingly is set in 1860 in darkest Cornwall (and not as you would perhaps expect in the Caribbean, or Haiti in particular).

Sir James Forbes, an eminent professor of medicine at London University, receives a troublesome letter from one...
Published on 5 Jan 2008 by LXIX

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars One of Hammer's best...
...but doesn't bear much re-watching. It's good to see zombies portrayed as something other than athletic cannibals and there are some genuinely creepy moments. However campness overwhelms it. It doesn't have the durability of Quatermass and some other Hammer offerings, but I'm happy to have watched it.
Published 2 months ago by J. Stockwell


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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A different setting for a zombie film, but it works, 5 Jan 2008
By 
LXIX (scotland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This film is fine and has a strong and commanding lead role by Andre Morell. It's a good story, is well put together, and interestingly is set in 1860 in darkest Cornwall (and not as you would perhaps expect in the Caribbean, or Haiti in particular).

Sir James Forbes, an eminent professor of medicine at London University, receives a troublesome letter from one of his former protege students and decides, along with his pretty daughter, Sylvia, to visit him.

In the Cornish village, 13 people have died within a year and all under mysterious circumstances. Suspiciously, the local squire will not authorise any autopsies. The doctors decide to investigate and in doing so uncover empty coffins, voodoo practice, strange going-ons at a disused tin mine and, ultimately, as the title suggests, a plague of zombies.

Diane Clare plays the role of the voluptuous Victorian beauty and overall this is a decent 86 minute offering from the Hammer team.

The dream scene is particularly memorable and is a famous slice of 60's horror (remember that this film was actually made before 'Night of the Living Dead').

It is ironic that the human psyche naturally fears the idea of zombies but, at the same time, a belief in life after death is a basic tenet of most world religions.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Undead Has Never Looked So Good!, 17 Jun 2013
By 
Rick "RickAnne :o)" (Lincolnshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Plague of the Zombies (Blu-ray + DVD) [1966] (Blu-ray)
Plague Of The Zombies is one of my favourite Hammer Horrors. I was introduced to it in my early years when the B.B.C put a double feature of horror movies on under the banner, 'Dracula, Frankenstein & Friends'. As well as being introduced to the Universal classics (Karloff, Lugosi, Chaney etc) we were treated to these wonderful colour gems from the Hammer stable. This BluRay looks fantastic, & the powers at be (in this case, StudioCanal) have done a fantastic job, with some nice little extras to boot. A must have for all Hammer fans.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the Better Hammers, 1 Jan 2005
By 
E. A. Redfearn "eredfearn2" (Middlesbrough) - See all my reviews
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This film made back to back with The Reptile is actually one of Hammers most popular films. A fine cast, decent sets, a good script and a really good dream sequence when the zombies emerge from their graves make it a really good watch indeed. Also includes the lovely Jacqueline Pearce who is fondly remembered for her role in Blakes Seven a few years back. Overall, a fine effort worth adding to any DVD collection. Good picture and sound too.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brook Williams is perfect as the ineffectual doctor, 20 Aug 2014
By 
A.J.Bradley (Belper,Derbyshire) - See all my reviews
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The image of the zombie holding Jacqueline Pearce has been with me since I acquired my first horror magazine, 'Monster Mania', when I was still at junior school. It must have been some years before I saw the movie itself, because we all had to wait in those days for Hammer, AIP etc. to show up on (most likely) BBC2 on a Friday night.
This is classic, mid-period Hammer (they were going off the boil by now), featuring the superb (and highly underrated) John Carson as the voodoo-meddling villain and Andre Morrell as the Van Helsing-type character, Sir James. Brook Williams is perfect as the ineffectual doctor, and the only weak link is Diane Clare, who really couldn't act and, I'm afraid, wasn't sexy enough for Hammer. (I'm afraid they hadn't yet discovered the likes of Linda Hayden). No George Woodbridge, but Michael Ripper is on hand as the village police sergeant.
You have to hand it to Hammer, they could dish it out from time to time, even when Terence Fisher wasn't helming the film. The early ones have a real period charm now and 'Plague Of The Zombies' just about manages to fall into this category.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hammer makes a film about traditional zombies, 15 April 2005
By A Customer
"The Plague of Zombies" is the only Hammer film to deal with that particular type of walking dead and one of the studio's better efforts once you get past the idea of the voodoo of Haiti being used in Cornwall to solve a labor shortage. The film begins with an intense voodoo ceremony that somehow disturbs the sleep of Alice Tompson (Jaqueline Pearce). She happens to be the wife of Dr. Peter Tompson (Brook Williams), the physician of a small Cornish village whose patients have been dying due to some mysterious malady that he can not even diagnose let alone cure. The good doctor's mentor Sir James Forbes (Andre Morell) has traveled with his daughter Sylvia (Diana Clare) to see if he can help. While the women have a run in with Clive Hamilton (John Carson), the local squire (and the obvious man behind all the evil doings), the physicians find they cannot do any autopsies because all of the graves of the recent dead are empty!
The most memorable moment in this film is when Peter passes out and the dead erupt from their graves in a dream sequence. Ultimately the film suffers from the fact that the audience is so far ahead of the characters in terms of figuring out the mystery. Of course Hamilton spent years in Haiti and is using the dead to work his otherwise unprofitable tin mine. The mysteries are only mysteries because Peter Bryan's script says they are mysteries. However, "Plague of Zombies" does remind us of what the term "zombies" meant before the flesh-eating corpses of George Romero et al. Note: This 1966 film was shot on the same sets as "The Reptile," also directed by John Gilling and also set in Cornwall, but the production crew does a nice job of redressing everything so its hard to tell.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of Hammer's very finest, 1 Mar 2014
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
“This isn’t London, sir. This is a Cornish village inhabited by simple country people, riddled with superstition and all dominated by a squire. He acts as coroner and magistrate, judge and jury.”

Although not among their best known, The Plague of the Zombies is one of Hammer’s very best, and a very different take on the genre than that George A. Romero would usher in only two years later. For a start it’s a period piece and its zombies are more victims than flesh-eating fiends, the result of a curious plague that begins with lethargy and ends with living death that’s baffled local doctor Brook Williams and is threatening to take the life of both his wife and his mentor’s daughter.

You don’t have to look far for who’s responsible: back from foreign parts with a lot of money and the kind of friends Sir Hugo Baskerville would have hung out with before running into that large canine on the moors, John Carson’s dissolute squire has taken a leaf from Murder Legendre’s book of labour relations to deal with the local manpower shortage and is killing off and raising the locals from the dead to work in his dangerous abandoned tin mine. And what a quite splendid villain the silken-voiced Carson is. Coming across as James Mason’s (more) evil brother, he avoids pure melodrama in a part that would have seen many chewing the scenery by exuding aristocratic indifference from every pore whenever confronted by his many social inferiors who are barely worth his contempt, is proud of his non-conformity (“In order to be popular, one must conform. I find that too big a price to pay. I have my own standards. I conform to them.”) and it’s even heavily implied he’s had his wicked way with the heroine before he tries to kill her, which seems to be his preferred method of avoiding long-term entanglements.

If Richard Burton’s protégé Williams is a typically nice-but-bland Hammer hero chosen primarily for the ability to pass as coming from the right side of the tracks (not always a priority with Hammer starlets, who could always be – and often were – dubbed), there’s always the ever-excellent Andre Morell on the side of the angels as the distinguished specialist called in from London to diagnose the plague and Michael Ripper, the true face of Hammer, as the local police sergeant. There’s excellent direction from the ever-undervalued John Gilling, good performances, particularly from a superb Jacqueline Pearce (though Diane Clare is pretty bad and the actress dubbing her isn’t much better) and a terrific dream scene with hands clawing up towards the surface and zombies shaking the dirt of the grave from their faces while Roy Ashton’s unsettling zombie make-up makes you wonder if Dick Smith saw the film when deciding on Linda Blair’s demonic look in The Exorcist. Gilling and co-stars Jacqueline Pearce and Michael Ripper would go on to shoot The Reptile on the same sets the same year to less memorable effect, making for an interesting homemade double-bill, but for all the superficial similarities this retains its own unique identity and stands as one of the studio’s best and one of those rare films that seems to get better each time you see it.

Sadly the UK DVD offers no extras, losing it a star - Anchor Bay's US DVD included an episode of the World of Hammer clip show, trailer and 2 TV spots for its double-bill with Frankenstein Created Woman while StudioCanal's UK Blu-ray/DVD combo offers a splendid restoration with a new half hour documentary, episode of World of Hammer and UK trailer.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Hammer's very best in an excellent Blu-ray restoration, 9 July 2012
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Plague of the Zombies (Blu-ray + DVD) [1966] (Blu-ray)
"This isn't London, sir. This is a Cornish village inhabited by simple country people, riddled with superstition and all dominated by a squire. He acts as coroner and magistrate, judge and jury."

Although not among their best known, The Plague of the Zombies is one of Hammer's very best, and a very different take on the genre than that George A. Romero would usher in only two years later. For a start it's a period piece and its zombies are more victims than flesh-eating fiends, the result of a curious plague that begins with lethargy and ends with living death that's baffled local doctor Brook Williams and is threatening to take the life of both his wife and his mentor's daughter.

You don't have to look far for who's responsible: back from foreign parts with a lot of money and the kind of friends Sir Hugo Baskerville would have hung out with before running into that large canine on the moors, John Carson's dissolute squire has taken a leaf from Murder Legendre's book of labour relations to deal with the local manpower shortage and is killing off and raising the locals from the dead to work in his dangerous abandoned tin mine. And what a quite splendid villain the silken-voiced Carson is. Coming across as James Mason's (more) evil brother, he avoids pure melodrama in a part that would have seen many chewing the scenery by exuding aristocratic indifference from every pore whenever confronted by his many social inferiors who are barely worth his contempt, is proud of his non-conformity ("In order to be popular, one must conform. I find that too big a price to pay. I have my own standards. I conform to them.") and it's even heavily implied he's had his wicked way with the heroine before he tries to kill her, which seems to be his preferred method of avoiding long-term entanglements.

If Richard Burton's protégé Williams is a typically nice-but-bland Hammer hero chosen primarily for the ability to pass as coming from the right side of the tracks (not always a priority with Hammer starlets, who could always be - and often were - dubbed), there's always the ever-excellent Andre Morell on the side of the angels as the distinguished specialist called in from London to diagnose the plague and Michael Ripper, the true face of Hammer, as the local police sergeant. There's excellent direction from the ever-undervalued John Gilling, good performances, particularly from a superb Jacqueline Pearce (though Diane Clare is pretty bad and the actress dubbing her isn't much better) and a terrific dream scene with hands clawing up towards the surface and zombies shaking the dirt of the grave from their faces while Roy Ashton's unsettling zombie make-up makes you wonder if Dick Smith saw the film when deciding on Linda Blair's demonic look in The Exorcist. Gilling and co-stars Jacqueline Pearce and Michael Ripper would go on to shoot The Reptile on the same sets the same year to less memorable effect, making for an interesting homemade double-bill, but for all the superficial similarities this retains its own unique identity and stands as one of the studio's best and one of those rare films that seems to get better each time you see it.

Sadly the UK region B-locked Blu-ray doesn't include the double-bill trailer pairing the film with Dracula, Prince of Darkness that's on the deleted US Anchor Bay DVD and which offers free Dracula fangs for the guys in the audience and zombie eyes for the gals, but it does have a truly excellent restoration (which uses the original UK title sequence, slightly different to the one on Anchor Bay's US DVD) and a very decent extras package - a new 34-minute documentary with Carson and Pearce (who recalls Morell's undisguised contempt for Diane Clare's amateurish performance), an episode of the World of Hammer clip show and trailer.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hammer's version of zombie horror, 1 Mar 2012
An usual hammer film as well as an usual zombie film, nothing like the zombie films produced today.Set in a small english country village the film is about a strange disease which has killed twelve people in as many months but the local doctor has no idea what it is and so he calls on his mentor, sir james forbes(andre morell)for help in stopping the plague that is slowly killing the villagers off.The transfer is excellent and overall this film is well worth buying if your a hammer fan
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Blu-Ray Transfer, 26 Jun 2012
By 
KoD (Toronto, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Plague of the Zombies (Blu-ray + DVD) [1966] (Blu-ray)
This is another superb Hammer Blu-Ray from Studio Canal. The colours are vibrant and lush, the image is crisp and clear and the audio is excellent. The movie itself is one of Hammers best efforts from the 60's. The plot is silly and fun, Voodoo in Cornwall! but helped immensely by the great looking, though brutally cheap, production values and the better than average acting. This makes for a great double bill with the simultaneously released Blu-Ray of The Reptile, a movie that was filmed using the same sets and some of the same actors, or with the movie it was originally released with as the B feature paired with Dracula, Prince of Darkness, a controversial Blu-Ray release from earlier this year (though I personally found it to be a great transfer and a vast vast improvement over any of the dvd versions). The extras are good, especially the interviews with surviving cast and devotees. I would give the movie a 3.5 to 4 star rating, but the Blu-Ray transfer rates a big 5.
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3.0 out of 5 stars One of Hammer's best..., 18 Jun 2014
By 
J. Stockwell (Here, there and everywhere) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Plague of the Zombies (Blu-ray + DVD) [1966] (Blu-ray)
...but doesn't bear much re-watching. It's good to see zombies portrayed as something other than athletic cannibals and there are some genuinely creepy moments. However campness overwhelms it. It doesn't have the durability of Quatermass and some other Hammer offerings, but I'm happy to have watched it.
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Plague of the Zombies (Blu-ray + DVD) [1966]
Plague of the Zombies (Blu-ray + DVD) [1966] by John Gilling (Blu-ray - 2012)
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