Customer Reviews


146 Reviews
5 star:
 (87)
4 star:
 (38)
3 star:
 (13)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (6)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tyrannosaur - Powerhouse film from Paddy Considine
This is a gritty slice of noirish realism from first time director (but a familiar face in front of the camera) Paddy Considine. It tells the story of Jacob (Peter Mullan) a man for whome life has been one long misery, full of violence, alcohol and deprivation. A chance meeting with Hannah (for whome life appears at first to be perfect) might just lift some of the...
Published on 2 Aug 2012 by Victor

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Tyrannosaur
The film Tyrannosaur is very compelling and not what you would think it is going to be from the title.
Published 19 months ago by Jean


‹ Previous | 1 215 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tyrannosaur - Powerhouse film from Paddy Considine, 2 Aug 2012
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Tyrannosaur [DVD] (DVD)
This is a gritty slice of noirish realism from first time director (but a familiar face in front of the camera) Paddy Considine. It tells the story of Jacob (Peter Mullan) a man for whome life has been one long misery, full of violence, alcohol and deprivation. A chance meeting with Hannah (for whome life appears at first to be perfect) might just lift some of the darkness and bring a little light into his life. But as ever, it is going to be a struggle.

This is a story of damaged people trying to find their way through the world. It shows how you shouldn't just take people at face value, and how there can be a lot more going on behind the scenes than you realise. It deals with domestic violence of a variety of shades, and with mental illness. It is not a fun film to watch, but it is very worthwhile and moving.

Impressive performances from the cast, especially Olivia Coleman (hitherto only known to me as a sidekick to Mitchell and Webb), bring Paddy Considine's dark vision to life. Peter Mullan as the moody Jacob is impressive, seeming to burst from the screen when enraged, as though the television is not big enough to hold all of his anger. I felt threatened by his presence at times, even through the separation of the film camera. Olivia Coleman brings strength and dignity to her role as her relationship with Jacob evolves, managing to show how she takes inspiration from his anger and violence to deal with her own problems.

It's tough and gritty, but I felt that these were real people dealing with real problems, and I have to say it was an impressive debut for Considine the director. 5 stars.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


59 of 63 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A film about beasts and monsters, 9 Dec 2011
This review is from: Tyrannosaur [DVD] (DVD)
TYRANNOSAUR
(dir. Paddy Considine/91 minutes)

Paddy Considine's directorial debut was the big winner at last week's British Independent Film Awards, picking up trophies for Best Director, Best Actress and Best Film. And rightly so. It's a remarkable film about beasts and monsters that pulls no punches. It's unrelentingly unpleasant; one (graphic) scene towards the beginning drew a collective gasp of horror from the audience in the cinema. It tells the story of `tyrannosaur' Joseph, characteristically played with blistering rage by Peter Mullan. Joseph is a violent, bitter, alcoholic widower, full of anger and pain. He meets Hannah (a stunning performance by Olivia Coleman), an all-round good egg (she's a devout Christian working in a charity shop, what more proof do you need that she's a good person?) who takes Joseph under her wing and helps him on the road to recovery and redemption. It all sounds a bit predictable written down on the page like that, but the execution is far from predictable as Hannah is hiding something equally terrible about her own life. All the performances are standout (Eddie Marsan makes a distinct impression in his limited screen time as Hannah's monstrous husband James). Casting Coleman, primarily known as a comedy actress in Peep Show, Rev and Green Wing among others, was a masterstroke as she's so warm and nice that you just want to give her a hug. She'll break your heart. That's a promise.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Avoids cliche, 23 Feb 2012
By 
Withnail67 (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Tyrannosaur [DVD] (DVD)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This could have so very easily been a clumsy and derivative film with monotone emotional range: it is to the credit of director and cast that it avoids cliche and achieves a subtle emotional range.

The press reviews have been dominated by comparisions to Shane Meadows, Ken Loach, 'Nil By Mouth' and even Edward Bond. All of these elements are present, but the film avoids being a collage of British working-class 'misery' cinema, and manages to be more than the sum of its parts. Oldman's film is perhaps its closest relative in its cunning and knowing manipulation of bleakly comic dialogue.

Attacking the film as a middle class, exploitative depiction of working class life is pointless and counteracts its own criticism: this is a sombre and skilful evocation of brutalised lives, not a documentary on those lives in reality. On the other end of the scale, the film avoids simplistic moralities about redemption and slaps down any notion of the nobility of suffering.

In its knowing artistry, subtle plotting, and powerful characterisation, this film is an disquieting but necessary experience.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dog Rough Debut, 5 Jun 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Tyrannosaur [DVD] (DVD)
I sort of knew that if Paddy Considine made a film it would be like this. Hard drinking gamblers and fighters. Tattooed, benefit dependent thugs with baseball bats and weapon dogs. Random racism and calculated GBH. Neglected children bearing witness to adult trails of dysfunction and destruction. Lost souls reaching for lost souls in a land of the soulless. A funeral, a wake, a coming together. There's no doubt this is a good film. Olivia Colman is just beautiful as the cross-wearing, alcoholic charity shop worker; Eddie Marsan is his usual fathomless, weird-headed menace; and Peter Mullan does admirably what the hard man role asks of him. Paddy was never going to have a musical, or a costume drama or a stab at Shakespeare as his directorial debut so should I be surprised that this is what it is? Probably not. Is art, because it supposedly imitates life, a perpetual re-affirmation of a community of stereotypes? Possibly. And although there's nothing wrong with drawing truth from what you know I could have done with some more shade and colour in the narrative and a little less immersion in the world of the depressed underclass. If that meant an extra fifteen minutes on the length it would have been worth it as I thought the film was a bit too short.

`Tyrannosaur' might bear comparison with Samantha Morton's 2009 directorial debut 'Unloved'. In some ways their directors' biogs are similar - an East Midlands origin, falling into acting through non-traditional routes, working class upbringings - but whereas Moreton's film about a little girl's experience growing up in care is both bleak and beautiful Considine's is just bleak. Despite the stylistic - and gender - differences both films seem to go to similar places; buy both and view them as a pair.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Moving, Difficult To Watch 90mins., 21 Feb 2012
By 
Mr. B. R. Good (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Tyrannosaur [DVD] (DVD)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
With a small, talented cast, this film was written and directed by a man who had been under my radar for ages - Paddy Considine. I first discovered him as the lead in Shane Meadows', 'A Room for Romeo Brass'.

The plot in a nutshell: An angry, disturbed alcoholic, alone since the death of his beloved wife roams from dole office to pub in a never ending cycle of aggression and confrontation. He discovers Hannah, a middle class, kind Christian lady, with a secret. She may live on the pleasant side of town but her life is a circle of physical and emotional abuse by her husband.

Tyrannosaur did not immediately capture my interest, however, as a testament to the quality of the writing and production, I reached then end without taking a break once. The story of Joseph a troubled alcoholic played by the excellent Peter Mullan, finds solace in a vulnerable Charity shop worker, played by the popular Olivia Coleman.

A slightly crass observation perhaps, but the usually attractive Olivia Coleman (actually 38) does not look a day under 45 in this film.

As the film gets going, we see an extremely familiar face of British realism/gritty drama, Eddie Marsan, a man who crops up in virtually ever British drama these days. For a good reason, he is a superb character actor. He plays James, the violent, repulsive husband to Coleman's character Hannah.

It's a difficult watch because of the fact that real people are living these identical lives every day on any street or housing estate.

It was probably not necessary to include some of the scenes of animal abuse, it makes the film especially difficult to watch. The overwhelming theme that is woven into the fabric of the plot is about hopelessness, poverty and depression. Sad people living troubled lives. The issue of child abuse, while upsetting, is handled well.

Paddy Considine knows what he is doing - this is clear from the fascinating extra features in which he provides a commentary and discusses deleted scenes. Another Shane Meadows? Most definitely.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A grim, but impressive T-Rex of a Brit drama, 20 Feb 2012
By 
T. BROOKES "Brookey" (Midlands, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Tyrannosaur [DVD] (DVD)
An excellent but hard to watch and grasp Brit film, undoubtedly Meadows-esque and as gritty, real and dark as they come. Considine directs impressively, the film is well shot and paced and features excellent acting contributions from an odd placed Olivia Colemen (from Peep Show fame), Peter Mullan (Neds director) and Eddie Marsen (many films).

Fans of dogs may wish to avoid.

Plot - A drunken widower's path crosses with an abused wife's in this grim, dark and brutal tale about unhappy existences, in the North of England.

Padd Considine is obviously talented when it comes to films (acting or directing with this his first) having learned from the excellent Shane Meadows, it will be interesting what he does next!

Fans of this should try out 'Dead Man's Shoes', 'Fish tank', 'Submarine', 'Neds' and 'This is England'.

'The film is an expansion of Dog Altogether, a short film for Warp Films that Considine wrote and directed, which won the Best Short Film BAFTA and BIFA awards as well as the Silver Lion award at Venice in 2007. Mullan and Colman also appeared in the short film, playing the same roles. Popplewell was also in the original short, but in a different role.' (Wikipedia)

The film is set in an unspecified town in the North of England. Although much of the film was shot on location in residential areas of Leeds and Wakefield.

The DVD features include deleted scenes, a mini behind the scenes and short story.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Undeniably powerful, but oh so bleak, 10 Feb 2012
This review is from: Tyrannosaur [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
If you have seen Considine's "Dog Altogether" (which is helpfully included as an extra here) then you will know exactly what to expect, as Tyrannosaur sets itself up as a practically direct sequel. Certainly in terms of performances the film does not disappoint, with both Peter Mullen and (particularly) Olivia Coleman being genuinely astonishing in their roles. But, if you HAVE seen "Dog Altogether", then you will know exactly the kind of ride you are in for. Bleak. Nihilistic. Violent. And, generally, deeply unpleasant.
Which is partly a problem with the film. There can be no doubting that Considine has a future as a director - the way he makes Mullen someone you come to almost care about is a talent most film-makers would kill to have - but by being so unrelentingly dark and piling grim scene after grim scene on the viewer he makes the film almost impossible to watch on occasion and an endurance test for all but the most hardened of those who will watch it.
Considine, it seems, realises this by having an ending which, while in keeping with what has gone before, also offers a welcome moment of hope for the main characters. Which, by this point, is sorely needed.
Without wishing to compare the two, his one time collaborator Shane Meadows also deals in such dark subjects, but he does so with a degree of subtlety, shade and even, when demanded, wit which is sadly lacking here.
Potential viewers should be aware that there is a genuinely horrific rape scene in the film and dog-lovers be warned: there are two moments which - while showing nothing graphic - do, by their implication, have the strong potential to upset.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great film... if you're in the mood for it, 8 Feb 2012
This review is from: Tyrannosaur [DVD] (DVD)
Some films thrill you, some scare you, some make you laugh. You choose which one depending on how you want to feel. Tyrannosaur is a fantastic movie, but you have to be in the mood for it. It's not a feel good type of film. It's gritty, nasty, dark, but ultimately uplifting (in a sad sort of way).

The main character, Joseph, is introduced to us as he kicks his beloved pet dog to death, smashes a Post Office window and gets into a fight with some youths in a pub. And he's our `hero' - he's the guy we're expected to root for. If you don't like the sound of him already, you're probably not going to enjoy his tale. He's not the most sympathetic of characters. Olivia Coleman (best known for her comedic roles, such as `Sophie' in Peep Show) is outstanding, showing just what a versatile actress she is.

Some people have criticised it as `yet more British miserablism.' That's a fair comment. It is pretty miserable. That's why if you're looking for something cheery, it's not for you. However, if you're willing to see just how depressing some people's lives are, you'll be glad you did - I'm guessing not many people are as trapped in such a downward, self-destructive spiral as the two central characters. If nothing else, you'll be glad you're not them.

Oh, and don't get your hopes up about seeing giant dinosaurs - it's a metaphor - Jurassic Park, this isn't.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dodgy title, stunning movie!, 15 Feb 2012
By 
J. L. Keogh (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Tyrannosaur [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
How many people originally thought this movie was going to be about dinosaurs? Me for one. When I saw the trailer and read reviews I wasn't sure it was the movie for me but it did rate very highly and so I thought, why not.

I rented this movie from Lovefilm and I must admit it kept getting put to the bottom of the pile. Today I was off sick work with a cold and with daytime TV the only other option I decided to finally watch it. Well I was held captive from the very first scene. As an animal lover I was shocked by the opening scenes with the dog but thought it was actually sensitively done (if that's possible). Knowing a lot of damaged people I felt for Joseph almost from the beginning and the scene where he runs into the charity shop and Hannah prays for him had me crying.

A lot of the other reviews have gone into the storyline and how miserable the movie is. Strangely I found it uplifting. Despite the loss Joseph had in his life and the misery Hannah had in hers, they still had people who cared. There was not a misplaced scene in the whole movie and the ending was indeed a shock to me.

If you are thinking of watching this movie, then do. It is not as miserable as other reviews make out if you look for the good in it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


57 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing and Riveting, 13 Jan 2012
By 
Valerie J. (West Yorks, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Tyrannosaur [DVD] (DVD)
Tyrannosaur is a powerful award-winning drama about a man who suffers from terrible outbursts of rage who, after one public outburst, dashes into a charity shop and hides. There, he is consoled by a religious woman who prays for him. Sounds like the comfortable sort of Christian drama that you might watch on a Sunday afternoon, doesn't it? Well, it isn't. Joseph (Peter Mullan) kicks his dog to death in a fit of rage within the first few minutes of the movie, his language is strong and relentless throughout, and Hannah (Olivia Colman), despite her Christianity and her charity, is a battered wife who suffers the most despicable physical abuse by her husband, James (Eddie Marsan).

If you can take the disturbing elements of this movie, then you will watch an exceptional drama that, for me, dragged up all sorts of emotions. I was repelled by Joseph and his tirades. I was angry with Hannah for not going to the police and having her nightmare of a husband put away. I was frustrated by them both. And I could not stop watching the drama unfold and it was relentless and I didn't come away from it happy, or relieved. But it did get me thinking how lucky I am to live in my world that is not theirs and it did make me hope that that never changes. There but for the grace of God go I, as the saying goes.

Tyrannosaur has beaten Tinker Tailer Soldier Spy in the British Independent Film Awards. I don't know if I could ever watch it again. If I do, it won't be any time soon. But it's a powerful movie, an exceptional one and certainly, I think, deserves watching once.

Written and directed by Paddy Considine who is also an actor. He starred in The Cry of the Owl (2009) and Dead Man's Shoes (2004) which he also wrote. Watch out for Peter Mullan and Eddie Marsan in Steven Spielsberg's The War Horse (2011). Eddie Marsan also appeared in London Boulevard (2010), also starring Colin Farrell. Olivia Colman plays Carol Thatcher in the 2011 movie The Iron Lady about Margaret Thatcher.

You can see my movies and books website via my profile. x
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 215 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Tyrannosaur [DVD]
Tyrannosaur [DVD] by Peter Mullan (DVD - 2012)
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews