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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FLASHY AT HIS BEST
Flashman's Lady is by far my favourite of the 'Flashman' series. It sees our (anti) hero getting himself in the way of pirates, psychotic large breasted despots and some quite sharp bowling! In this volume he travels to Singapore, Borneo, Madagascar and most exotically of all a certain cricket ground in St John's Wood.
For those of you unfamiliar with the Flashman...
Published on 13 Jan 2003 by T Marshall

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3.0 out of 5 stars Flashman loses the plot
I'm a great admirer of GMF's wonderful literary creation Harry Flashman, having enjoyed the first five books, but the pace is well off in this instalment. The book opens with a 100 page treatise on the 1840s cricket scene. Frankly it took me three attempts to wade through this part. The paper-thin plot then takes us to some familiar boys-own adventures in the byways of...
Published on 8 Aug 2009 by C. Young


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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FLASHY AT HIS BEST, 13 Jan 2003
By 
T Marshall (Hampshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Flashman's Lady is by far my favourite of the 'Flashman' series. It sees our (anti) hero getting himself in the way of pirates, psychotic large breasted despots and some quite sharp bowling! In this volume he travels to Singapore, Borneo, Madagascar and most exotically of all a certain cricket ground in St John's Wood.
For those of you unfamiliar with the Flashman volumes I feel great envy. To be able to read them again from scratch would be a joy. However, the name of Harry Flashman may be familiar to you from Tom Brown's Schooldays by Thomas Hughes. He was the main villain of the piece who eventually got kicked out of Rugby for getting drunk. The first volume (Flashman) details what happens to Flashy from the moment he was kicked out to when he managed to secure the thanks of Parliament for his herioc deeds in the Army in Afghanistan. The fun of Flashman is that he is a complete bounder and coward, with a magnetic attraction for disaster and personal danger. He usually tumbles into each escapade as a result of trying to get his leg-over a member of the fairer sex; the volume 'Flashman's Lady' is no exception.
So, due to his scurrilous behaviour with some bookies at a cricket match, and a Duke's Mistress he ends up voyaging half way around the globe with his wife and her father at the expense of a suspiciously generous Eastern trader. No sooner have they all arrived in Singapore then the Trader kidnaps the wife, whilst Flashy is Shanghied at a brothel, before being forced to pursue her into a pirates nest.
Now with most novels of this kind I would have just given away about two thirds of the plot, and as like dissuaded you from picking the thing up for a scan, however, with this particular beauty I have barely scratched the surface. Even so, I could try my damndest to spoil the story for you, and could even succeed, but I could never spoil the book itself. For we know that Flashy will survive (it's his memoirs after all) the joy is in the journey, and how he manages to scrape through with reputation intact. The added bonus of ths volume (and why it is my favourite) is the extracts from his dotty wife's journal. They are genuinely laugh-out-loud funny, providing you have a little empathy about you.
I would always recommend reading the Flashman series in order, but if you only want a taste of it, then you can do no worse than this volume. It is an absolute gem and worth every penny you can spare to secure a copy.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mr & Mrs Flash make a great couple !, 4 July 2005
I have come to the Flashman papers quite late (nearly 40 years after they first appeared). I am now working my way through them in chronological order of which Flashman's Lady is the 3rd book, but it was the 6th to be released. Put simply this is the best I have read yet, the writing has matured and so have the characters with Flashman more of himself and less constrained by the original portrait of him in Tom Brown's Schooldays. This adventure sees Flash attempting to counter the not-so subtle advances on his wife which lead to what is surely the funniest cricket match ever written and thereafter out to Singapore and Borneo before concluding in Madagascar. What is amazing is that the key characters are all unbelievable and yet real historicial people faithfully recorded and they only really make sense in either Flashman's world or British colonial history. If you haven't read Flashman my honest advice is to start at the first book and then read all of them because they follow a thread. In my experience though it is this book which brings together Flashman's cynicism and earthy view of the world and the Empire into a convincing view of his times. The Flashman books get better and better and if you have read Royal Flash and were disappointed then don't give up as things take off magnificently from here on in.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Flash shows an uncharacteristic spark of selflessness, 27 Dec 2005
By 
Amazon Customer (Glendale, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
In the 1966 screen adaptation of A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS, Sir Thomas More (Paul Scofield) advises his daughter Meg (Susannah York):
"If (God) suffers us to come to such a case that there is no escaping, then we may stand to our tackle as best we can. And, yes Meg, then we can clamor like champions, if we have the spittle for it. But it's God's part, not our own, to bring ourselves to such a pass. Our natural business lies in escaping."
One of the most endearing qualities of author George MacDonald Fraser's anti-heroic protagonist, Harry Flashman, is his natural cowardice, which he freely admits with a certain degree of pride. Flashy is an expert at escaping; More would have been impressed.
In that volume of his memoirs entitled FLASHMAN'S LADY, Flashy is still young in the mid-1840s. His talent for a prudent and precipitous departure has yet to mature, as evidenced by his delayed response when beset by thugs in a dodgy section of Singapore:
"I'm not proud of what happened in the next moment. Of course, I was very young and thoughtless, and my great days of instant flight and evasion were still ahead of me, but even so, with ... my native cowardice to boot, my reaction was inexcusable ... in my youthful folly and ignorance, I absolutely stood there gaping ..."
The larger portion of this book's plot involves the kidnapping of Flashy's beautiful but scatterbrained wife, Elspeth, by a certain Don Solomon Haslam, a moneyed and mannered member of English high society who's not what he seems. Harry's determination to stay out of harm's way is severely taxed as he pursues Elspeth's rescue into the pirate-infested interior of Borneo, and later into Madagascar, where Flashy finds himself the slave of that island's mad and despotic queen, Ranavalona.
A chief attraction of Fraser's Flashman series is the knowledge it gives the reader about historical and factual, but arcane, events and places. In FLASHMAN'S LADY, the reader is apprised of the private war against the pirates of the East Indies by the eccentric English imperialist, James Brooke, and the reign of terror perpetuated by that female Caligula of the period, Queen Ranavalona I of Madagascar. Indeed, the author's research into the latter has prompted me to place a non-fiction history of the subject on my Wish List.
Deep down, I think, Flashy's personal appeal is based on the realization that he's Everyman, whether one would wish to admit it or not. Our natural preference is to escape, and it's only through blundering circumstance, good luck, or an odd quirk of fate that any one of us might, like Harry himself, be perceived a hero by our fellows.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FLASHY AT HIS BEST, 27 Dec 2002
By 
T Marshall (Hampshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Flashman's Lady (Hardcover)
Flashman's Lady is by far my favourite of the 'Flashman' series. It sees our (anti) hero getting himself in the way of pirates, psychotic large breasted despots and some quite sharp bowling! In this volume he travels to Singapore, Borneo, Madagascar and most exotically of all a certain cricket ground in St John's Wood.
For those of you unfamiliar with the Flashman volumes I feel great envy. To be able to read them again from scratch would be a joy. However, the name of Harry Flashman may be familiar to you from Tom Brown's Schooldays by Thomas Hughes. He was the main villain of the piece who eventually got kicked out of Rugby for getting drunk. The first volume (Flashman) details what happens to Flashy from the moment he was kicked out to when he managed to secure the thanks of Parliament for his herioc deeds in the Army in Afghanistan. The fun of Flashman is that he is a complete bounder and coward, with a magnetic attraction for disaster and personal danger. He usually tumbles into each escapade as a result of trying to get his leg-over a member of the fairer sex; the volume 'Flashman's Lady' is no exception.
So, due to his scurrilous behaviour with some bookies at a cricket match, and a Duke's Mistress he ends up voyaging half way around the globe with his wife and her father at the expense of a suspiciously generous Eastern trader. No sooner have they all arrived in Singapore then the Trader kidnaps the wife, whilst Flashy is Shanghied at a brothel, before being forced to pursue her into a pirates nest.
Now with most novels of this kind I would have just given away about two thirds of the plot, and as like dissuaded you from picking the thing up for a scan, however, with this particular beauty I have barely scratched the surface. Even so, I could try my damndest to spoil the story for you, and could even succeed, but I could never spoil the book itself. For we know that Flashy will survive (it's his memoirs after all) the joy is in the journey, and how he manages to scrape through with reputation intact. The added bonus of ths volume (and why it is my favourite) is the extracts from his dotty wife's journal. They are genuinely laugh-out-loud funny, providing you have a little empathy about you.
I would always recommend reading the Flashman series in order, but if you only want a taste of it, then you can do no worse than this volume. It is an absolute gem and worth every penny you can spare to secure a copy.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Healthy Flashy, 24 July 2001
Since discovering the wounderful world of Flashman,(or Flashy as I now refer to him),my general living standards/health have certainly improved!! GMF brings to life the victorian age through the wealth of historical facts that can be found in his wonerful series. Flashmans Lady is no exception.....we meet the much previously talked about Lady Flashman, who adds further amusment to the book with her 'diary entries'. If you havent yet entered the world of Flashman then you must.....Its good for you!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yet another superb Flashman, 8 April 2002
By A Customer
Even by Flash's free-trotting standards he certainly covers some miles in this volume. From Newgate to Lord's to Canterbury round Cape Horn to Singapore and Borneo before satisying the mass of flesh that is Queen Ranavalona of Madagascar. For the first (and so far only) time the reader is able to gain an insight into the flirtatious, hare-brained ponderings of Mrs Flashman through selected diary entries. Elspeth's comments do not betray any adulterous actions on her part but confirm her for the audacious flirt Flashman always said you was. Of as much relevance to the content is the cheekily erased comments which reveal that while Mrs Flashman's actions cannot be brought into queation, maybe her thoughts can.
Volume VI is another excellent tenant in the Flashman stable and, in Ranavalona, contains a deliciously sensuous and depraved villainess. Stirring Stuff!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enough adventures, based on sound history, for a dozen books, 31 May 2001
By A Customer
As Flashman immediately pitches in with his cynical views on cricket you know that you can relax and enjoy the kind of robust iconoclasm which has now become unfashionable. The adventures follow at the usual breakneck speed with Flashy caught up in a series of historical events.
Normally unimpeachable Victorian heroes fail to impress Flashman who views Empire heroics as stupidity. There are, as usual, sexual adventures including the requirement on Flashman to service a sadistic, psychotic and omnipotent queen. Flashman's own potency, under the circumstances, is wondrous. This is the kind of high octane entertainment, with a mix of adventure and comedy, which is unique to Flashman. Escapist adventure at its best.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Englishman Abroad (part 3 of 12), 4 May 2007
By 
Mr. William Oxley "oxenblocks" (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Flashman is somebody you will love. Not only does he travel the world, he shapes history. His adventures are every boys' dreams.

Relax and enjoy the ride of your life from cricket at Lords to human barbeques in Madagascar knowing that our non-PC, amoral, lovable-rogue, Flashman will somehow come out smelling of roses.

Buy it, read it, enjoy it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No Political Correctness here!, 5 Mar 2001
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Although this is the 6th volumn of the Flashman Papers, it should be read after Vol 1 in strict chronological order as it fills a gap in Flashmans memoirs. This book bridges the return of Flashman from Afgahnistan and his escapades in Royal Flash. Although readers may not agree with Flashmans sentiments, like me they may find the lack of Political Correctness refreshing. Written in the style and expression of the early nineteenth century, Fraser adds to the air of authenticity with the usual genuine historical notes. This book isn't the type that will have you laughing out loud as you read but it will make you smile as "Flash" continues his anti-heroic romp through the Victorian age.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beg, borrow or steal this book., 21 Aug 2000
By 
This book sees old Flashy in fine quivering form. From the books early description of idyllic cricket at Lords, Flashman becomes involved in a 'gentlemans wager' that sees him mixed up with JB Brooke and his fight against the pirates of Borneo. The narrative of a pirate ship coming into view through a thick fog paints as evocative a picture as you're ever likely to read. Throw in the raving mad Queen Ranavalona and the diabolical tortures she forced upon her subjects all told with the characteristic wit and intelligence of GM Fraser and you have this book. Very funny and hugely enjoyable.
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Flashman's Lady (The Flashman Papers, Book 3)
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