Customer Reviews


10 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Paid Companion
This was a good read in Amanda Quick's style, it kept moving and maintained your interest with a good story of romance and thriller I feel this is better than her last two titles and more of what is expected from Amanda. Her attention to detail is superb and I would recommend to anyone.
Published on 16 May 2004 by Sue Knowles

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Readable
This is the first novel of Amanda Quick I have read and it did not convinced me to read more (which I probable do anyway, because almost all authors have some books which are not so good). Plot is OK, but the spark was missing. I prefer books where you can feel the feeling and how they are growing. However, the book is OK...
Published on 13 July 2009 by Susanna Kataja


Most Helpful First | Newest First

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Paid Companion, 16 May 2004
By 
Sue Knowles (Northampton United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This was a good read in Amanda Quick's style, it kept moving and maintained your interest with a good story of romance and thriller I feel this is better than her last two titles and more of what is expected from Amanda. Her attention to detail is superb and I would recommend to anyone.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars engaging read but not sparkle, 22 May 2004
By 
Deborah MacGillivray "Author," (US & UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
I adore Jayne Ann no matter if it is Krentz, Castle or Amanda Q. But sigh, her last few half dozen books have been dull, only the Castle "After Glow" showing Jayne Ann can still razzle-dazzle with the best. This book is not JAK at her best - far from it - but it is a big improvement from the last two Quicks and two JAKs, that you tend to want to rate it higher than it deserves.
I liked the characters - and REALLY wanted to love the book - and after the fire works on "After Glow", I really hoped she would keep that power. It starts out well, but sort of loses steam quickly (no pun intended!). This book is JAK formula all the way. I love the formula, so I don't mind that. But I do mind a rather boring mystery slowing the book down. Since JAK moved from "Romance Writer" to "Mainstream Writer", she has lost "THE ROMANCE" and it's killing her books. She almost rises to the level, but not quite. She needs to rediscover the power of emotional bonds. Her toning down the emotional tension between her leads and making it more a comedy of manners with a week mystery tossed in for diversion is watering down the JAK Magic. The mystery is hardly a mystery, and almost falls into the old trite Who Dun It style of introducing the evil villain at nearly at the last minute.
I thought Eleanor and Arthur quite charming, they engaged my attention to the end, but they just did not sizzle with JAK's witchcraft.
It's a good solid read, just not a great one. Nice book for the beach.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 11 Aug 2005
By 
This review is from: The Paid Companion (Paperback)
I loved this book! Once I started reading it I could not put it down and stayed up until 4am to finish it! I just really wanted to know what happened to the characters and how the story would resolve itself. The Regency romance was excellent fun (self-sufficient young woman + Rochester-esque brooding hero = passionate love affair), and the murder mystery sufficiently engaging. I would definitely recommend this book for a fun cheery read!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fun read, 3 July 2005
By 
Helen Hancox "Auntie Helen" (Essex, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Paid Companion (Paperback)
This book is in a similar vein to all the other Amanda Quicks (harsh, overbearing man who has to learn to love) but it's still a good way to while away a half day. Elenora Lodge is a charming character, perhaps more worldly-wise and less irritating than some of Amanda Quick's other heroines. I was less keen on Arthur, the Earl St Merryn, but it's still a good book. The suspense/murder part seems rather tacked on, but it's a worthwhile read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A very engaging piece of audio fluff!, 29 Jun 2013
By 
Caz "So many books, so little time..." (Frinton-on-Sea) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Paid Companion (MP3 CD)
This was a lot of fun to listen to although I suspect I might not have enjoyed it as much had I read the book. Michael Page is one of those narrators whose name on an audiobook is guaranteed to make me take a second or third look, and even though he's not narrated a huge number of romance novels, I've enjoyed those I've heard. (Most recently, I liked his reading of Victoria Alexander's The Importance of Being Wicked).

The plot in this story centres around Arthur Lancaster, Earl of St. Merryn and his search for the murderer of his uncle, who had been one of a group of three brilliant scientists who, in their younger days, had been fascinated by the prospect of constructing something called "Jove's Thunderbolt" (which sounds to me like some type of laser) from a set of obscure alchemical plans. The project was never completed, however, as the trio moved on to more serious scientific and philosophical matters.

Eleanora Lodge is a young woman fallen on hard times since the death of her father who is forced to seek employment in order to support herself. At the advanced age of twenty-six, she reasons that her best bet is to try to find work as a lady's companion and with that in mind, registers her interest with employment agencies that recruit ladies for such positions.

St. Merryn returns to London in order to begin his search but knowing his presence at the numerous and varied social functions that comprise the season will make him a prime target for all the match-making mamas, decides that the best way to escape them will be to arrive with a fiancée in tow. He therefore applies to an agency in order to hire a paid companion -and at first can find no-one who meets his exacting requirements.
Until Eleanora bursts in, unannounced.

So what we have here is a "pretend couple" romance, which I admit, is one of the tropes of which I'm quite fond. St. Merryn is rich, handsome and has a reputation for having a mind like a steel trap and a heart of ice. He's autocratic and doesn't suffer fools gladly which means that though he is generally well-respected by his peers, most of them are afraid - rather than fond - of him.

The romance progresses in a fairly predictable manner, and the author does a great job building some searing sexual tension between the couple. The sex scenes are fairly tame, but I rather liked the humourous tone, which was a nice link between their usual, day-to-day interactions and this new turn taken in their relationship. I always think that a couple that banters and teases will continue to do so in the bedroom - so the humour felt completely appropriate. I particularly liked this, from the first time they're *ahem* getting down to business:

... he casually removed a linen handkerchief from a pocket and placed it to one side. Did he expect to sneeze in the middle of this business? she wondered.

and then, later, when St. Merryn has a minor strop because he's just found out Eleanora was a virgin (to be fair, she'd kind of led him to believe she wasn't, but never explicitly said so either way)

"Damnation, I took you to be a lady of some experience in this sort of thing."
She smiled up at him. "I have good news, sir. As of this instant, I am, indeed, a lady of some experience."
"Do not taunt me," he warned. "I am exceedingly annoyed with you."
"Does that mean that you are not going to finish what we have started?"
His face was fierce in the firelight. "I cannot seem to think clearly at the moment."

The plot thickens, the mystery deepens and the clues start to come thick and fast. The dénouement is, I will admit, more than a bit daft, but what sustained my interest was the relationship between the two protagonists. Having employed Eleanora as a decoy so that he would be able to navigate his way around society seeking answers without being viewed as a viable marriage prospect, St. Merryn quickly realises that Eleanora's quick mind and natural intelligence can be of valuable assistance to him. He does not dismiss her opinions and in fact finds himself trusting her and her judgement more than he has done with almost anyone; and Eleanora very cleverly works out how - on occasion - to make her ideas seem like they were his ;-)

Michael Page's vocal characterisations are excellent and he is very good at differentiating between all the different individuals in the story. He is also one of those male narrators who is able to perform female characters convincingly by softening his tone rather than raising the pitch of his voice to a silly degree. I've read a criticism somewhere that his interpretation of St. Merryn was too high pitched and nasal, but I didn't find that at all. He did adopt a higher pitch and harsher tone than he used for his narration, but I felt it was in keeping with the character because Arthur is harsh - on the outside at least. I also thought that the stern tone worked very well with the humour in the book as St. Merryn is frequently shown to have a very dry sense of humour that is of the sort apt to be missed by the less discerning among the ton. I thought that giving his voice that element of severity only served to emphasise the contrast between St. Merryn the real man and the austere and rather forbidding face he presented to the world.

Finally, here's another of my favourite moments, from when Arthur proposes to Eleanora.

"I took one look at you and I knew that you would be the best investment I could ever possibly make."
She smiled tremulously. "Oh, Arthur, that is the most romantic thing anyone has ever said to me."
"Thank you. I was rather pleased with it, myself. I practiced it during the carriage ride here today."

To sum up - I love a witty hero with a mischievous sense of humour and a heroine who doesn't simper and who can give as good as she gets in the bantering stakes. The ending was undoubtedly silly, but I liked spending time with Arthur and Eleonora and Michael Page's excellent narration served to make The Paid Companion a very entertaining piece of audio fluff.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars pleasure, 15 Dec 2011
By 
This review is from: The Paid Companion (Paperback)
this is my first book by author amanda quick {aka jayne ann krentz, jayne castle} and will not be my last. a very enjoyable read that included both romance and mystery.
the hero arthur was for me a little stiff[ahem!] and remote, the heroine leonora was fiesty and brave. the story is set amongst the ton of old london town and although is essentially cinderella like ie young woman has to make her own way in the world through no fault of her own and is saved by rich young man! it is certainly a cut above from others of its ilk and engaged my interest from the start. my only complaint is the lack of feeling displayed by arthur. i felt his emotions were a little too contained but i suppose i am spoiled by the strong men in christine feehans work.
overall i would give this 4 stars and will seek out more by this talented author
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Another winning Amanda Quick novel, 27 Sep 2010
This review is from: The Paid Companion (Paperback)
Recently re-read this book and enjoyed it as much as I had the first two times I'd read it. The Earl of Merryn and Miss Elonora Lodge provide lots of entertainment, and you have to admire the Earl's resilience to Elonora's resourcefulness.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Readable, 13 July 2009
This review is from: The Paid Companion (Paperback)
This is the first novel of Amanda Quick I have read and it did not convinced me to read more (which I probable do anyway, because almost all authors have some books which are not so good). Plot is OK, but the spark was missing. I prefer books where you can feel the feeling and how they are growing. However, the book is OK...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, 20 Nov 2005
By 
R. K. Harvey "harvey_rebecca" (Essex, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Paid Companion (Paperback)
I was really surprised at how good this book was. It was so enjoyable I didn't want to put it down. I loved the characters and the plot was also interesting. If you haven't read any Amanda Quick novels before try this one, it's great!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fast paced read, 23 May 2004
The Paid Companion is one of the best Amanda Quick's I've read for a while. The pace is fast, the plot compelling, and the characters likeable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Paid Companion
The Paid Companion by Amanda Quick
5.99
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews