Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (5)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars Out of joint
70uk Le fantôme de la liberté by Luís Buñuel (1974, 104')

There is an ongoing discussion as to which of his last seven films - Diary of a Chambermaid (1964), Belle de Jour (1967), The Milky Way (1969), Tristana (1970), The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972), The Phantom of Liberty (1974), or That Obscure Object of Desire (1977) - is...
Published on 23 Mar 2012 by Dr René Codoni

versus
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars One for dedicated Luis Buñuel fans only
I've always compared The Phantom of Liberty to Monty Python's The Meaning of Life. Mainly because I've thought of it as a surrealistic comedy sketch film that deals with the absurdity of life.

I was wrong. Sort of. It might technically be a sketch film, but most of the sequences are too long and lacking in humour for large parts, for me to now really think...
Published on 19 May 2011 by BS on parade


Most Helpful First | Newest First

5.0 out of 5 stars Out of joint, 23 Mar 2012
By 
70uk Le fantôme de la liberté by Luís Buñuel (1974, 104')

There is an ongoing discussion as to which of his last seven films - Diary of a Chambermaid (1964), Belle de Jour (1967), The Milky Way (1969), Tristana (1970), The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972), The Phantom of Liberty (1974), or That Obscure Object of Desire (1977) - is the most surrealistic. Well, they are all Buñuel's, so the variation must be by degrees, and under that perspective, it is The Phantom of Liberty (1974).

Indeed, there is plenty of material: the ostrich turning her head fast left/right, the case of the non-missing school girl, the roof top shooter into crowds, who is immediately released after having been found guilty, the drinking party of Carmelite monks, smoking and playing cards in a motel room, and much more. Army and police are again recurrent motives, as is religion, though unlike the similar "Voie lactée" (1969), there is no continuity motif like the two tramps on a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela.

70uk Le fantôme de la liberté by Luís Buñuel (1974, 104')
23 March 2012
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Not a sketch show, 4 Feb 2010
On the surface this is as funny as "Bourgoisie", but much more satirical and subversive as the subject is grander, liberty itself. If you watch it for the comedy some rather unsettling messages remain in your head afterwards. That doesn't stop it being funny, the best comedy always makes you think as well as be entertained. Like "Bourgoisie" and "Object of Desire" this is a series of connected stories rather than a continuous narrative (in fact more so) and together the three films form a thought provoking trilogy. Watch all three (although unfortunately this is the wrong format for Europe, so you have to reset the DVD player, grrr!).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is the best Bunuel film ever, 18 April 2001
This is Bunuel at his most playful and subversive. It is the hidden gem amongst his works. I don't understand why it isn't more well-known. It is the film Discreet Charm of the Bourgouisie would have been if it hadn't been so Hollywood-ised. 'Phantom of Liberty' remains true to the original political ideals of surrealism.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars One for dedicated Luis Buñuel fans only, 19 May 2011
I've always compared The Phantom of Liberty to Monty Python's The Meaning of Life. Mainly because I've thought of it as a surrealistic comedy sketch film that deals with the absurdity of life.

I was wrong. Sort of. It might technically be a sketch film, but most of the sequences are too long and lacking in humour for large parts, for me to now really think of it as a sketch film. A certain quick fire quality of getting in and out of the sketches is missing. Also there's not much in the way of punchlines to the scenes as the joke is usually in the set up. As random and unconnected as much of it is, it doesn't necessarily feel like a sketch film.

The main problem with the film is the pace. It does try the patience a little. I'd imagine the more casual viewer will be climbing the walls in frustration long before the end. I yawned a few times, and I was certainly fed up with it during the last stretch. And Buñuel was usually someone whose movies didn't dillydally and actually got on with it.

Is the film funny? There are a few laughs in it, but there are long stretches that are barren of jokes (or anything to really hold your attention). The maddening thing about the film is that the good bits are very good. Sadly I doubt those parts edited end to end would last much beyond fifteen minutes.

For example: the sequence set in the storm lashed hotel has a good climax, involving a pervert being publicly flogged by his leather clad mistress. Unfortunately we have to endure about twenty minutes of unfunny, directionless tedium (monks playing cards, a young man trying to have an affair with a much older woman) to get a minute of good stuff. The ratio of bad to good is not in our favour.

It's a weak movie with a few good bits. If you go into it with a positive mind then you might at least get substantial enjoyment out of the better bits. If you go into it with big doubts then I don't think you'll get anything out of it, apart from a few yawns. It's not unwatchable; it's just not exactly a thrill ride. I've seen it many times, and although I've never loved it, I'm mildly surprised at how borderline boring it was.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Assorted tales of misuse of Liberty, 9 Jun 2005
By 
Jazzisticus (Lisbon,Portugal) - See all my reviews
Some people find it difficult to understant this movie, because it has no plot. Others think it is funny..
It is a series of "Vignetes" linked by a very tiny idea thread. The key to understand it is Goya's painting "El 3 de Mayo 1808 - Las executiones" about the executions of Spaniards in Toledo. Someone shouts "Vivan las cadenas" (hail to the chains). Bunuel himself plays a friar that faces the firing squad and dies. The French soldiers where supposed to bring freedom to the enchained Spanish people.
The same painting appears at the Police Inspector's office when the parents go there to report the missing daughter that is right there answering the Inspector's questions..
Later on, this same inspector arrests one "Prefet de Police" that went to the Cemitery and tried to open the coffin of his dead sister..A second "Prefect de Police" appears (played by Michel Picolli). He desmisses the inspector and both "Prefets", after drinking a scotch, go happily to the zoo to disperse a protest. We do not see the protesters, but hear the sounds of shots and cries of victims. Just before the "prefects" comment: "if some animals are killed, too bad for them..."
"Bunuel was everything, but arbitrary.." says (in French) Jean-Claude Carriere in a "Proposito de Bunuel" a documentary that accompanies the Criterion DVD of "Discreet Charm of the Bourgeosie".
I say Bunuel was never "funny, and in this movie he is crystal clear. Freedom only brings misery to mankind, except to a priviledged few who make stupid use if it...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A minor Bunuel masterpiece, 4 Jun 2003
By 
Penguin Egg (London, England) - See all my reviews
The Phantom of Liberty is made up of a series of surrealist vignettes held together by the loosest of narrative structures - Think of a Monty Python episode without the laughter-track. The opening scene has prisoners facing a firing squad, defiantly clenching their raised fists, and shouting, "Down with freedom" and "Long live chains." This pretty much sets the tone for the rest of the film. In another memorable scene, guests sit down at the dining table, but instead of chairs, they sit on toilets. To talk about food at the table is the height of vulgarity. There are other scenes just as good. This film may sound arty-farty, but it works and works brilliantly, and in no small part due to Luis Bunuel, who directs with the minimum of fuss and the maximum of effect. Don't let the surrealist tag put you off. This film is fun and was meant to be so. This may not be quite up there with the rest of Bunuel's classics : Belle De Jour, Simon of the Desert, or The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, with which The Phantom of Liberty has something in common; but it is still a minor masterpiece and will delight and baffle in equal measure.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Inculcated with too much Monty python, 4 Feb 2010
By 
E. Coolican "karajan lover" (london) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Clearly the result of trying to do a monty python, but coming from the wrong culture for it, he must be at least applauded for the attempt. There were longeurs, and several conceits simply didn't work, but it tripped fairly nicely along, it's just that I saw it after Descreet charm of the bourgeose, which is a superior film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews