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4.1 out of 5 stars
Dead Son Rising
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on 21 October 2011
Most artists and musical acts who have over 30 years in the business and a strong back catalogue are happy enough to rest on their laurels and tour the world playing their well known songs to fans new and old, not Gary Numan who has always been about evolving and playing his new material whilst throwing in a few classics but giving them a new feel along the way. So it should come as no surprise that Numan releases "Dead Son Rising" a new album that delivers big time and even throws in a few new ideas along the way. "Jagged" collaborator Ade Fenton is along for the ride as they take unfinished demos' tracks and ideas that have been lying around and deliver an album that is one of Numans finest.

The album begins with the excellent atmospheric instrumental "Resurrection" before the beats of "Big Noise Transmission" take over, the song has a real Prodigy feel about it and has Numan on fine vocal form and at times whispering the lyrics. The first single from the album "The Fall" is also one of the standout tracks starting out with a guitar sounding like Nine Inch Nails "The Day The World Went Away" from "The Fragile" album before some big beats kick in, it also features a great break down as Numan sings "How Does It Feel?", the song is about a friendship that ended.

The song "When The Sky Bleeds, He Will Come" is another standout as it builds slowly before a big industrial sounding guitar kicks in. We get two versions of the one song on the album in the song "For The Rest Of My Life" which is good but bettered by the reprised version that opens with a quiet piano before an acoustic guitar joins in with Numans vocal that is buried in the mix, it again sounds like Nine Inch Nails this time something of "Ghosts", Trent Reznor is a big influence on Numan now just as Numan was for Reznor when he was starting out. The song "Dead Sun Rising" is a song full of big beats and distorted synths and uses Numans cold vocal style delivery perfectly.

It's great to have Gary Numan making new music in the year 2011 and great music at that especially for a man who took a right bashing from the press, who should be ashamed of themselves for the way they treated him, it's great that he had the last laugh when so many acts came out and said how much an influence he has been on their carears. With "Dead Son Rising" there might be a few more joining that list!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 22 February 2012
Now this is more like it!

`Dead Son Rising' represents a neat step forward in Numan's chosen direction and as a stop-gap between `new' studio albums, bodes extremely well for the forthcoming `Splinter'.

These songs were originally leftovers from the last three albums, but were deemed too good to ditch permanently, so have been dusted off and formally completed. And what an excellent bunch of outtakes they are, harking back to the days when Numan's b-sides were often as good (if not better) than some of his album tracks.

The spooky instrumental `Resurrection' provides a quirky, atmospheric introduction to the album, which truly kicks into life on `Big Noise Transmission', an industrial rocker of the first order. Followed by the dark and magnificent `Dead Sun Rising' (surely one of Numan's finest songs ever) and the crushing `When The Sky Bleeds He Will Come', things quieten down for the sparse balladry of `For The Rest of My Life' and the unsettling `Not The Love We Dream Of' before the metal guitars belt back in for stomper `The Fall', then disappear again for the percussive oddness of `We Are The Lost'.

After that, the album seems to snuff itself out really and ends with a relatively low-key instrumental `Into Battle' and two utterly pointless instrumental remixes of `For The Rest of My Life' and `Not The Love We Dream Of'. But up to that point, a faultless performance!

So if this is where Numan is headed, bring it on. This is a great addition to the canon and I recommend to all it without reservation...it's how Numan sounds NOW and it's awsesome!

And I didn't even dock a star for the space wasted by the remixes, that's how much I love it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 23 February 2012
Haunting, atmospheric yet beautifully vulnerable with the additon of piano in the later tracks.
I love how Gary Numan can still on his 20th album 'pull something out of the bag'. Most artists nowadays are lucky to come up with 20 songs!
As with other Numan albums the style has progressed and changed (this album has been likened to having Nine Inch Nail undertones), yet it is still Numan's stamp all over it.
Superb with the headphones in and your eyes closed, it's truly the best way to absorb it. Having already booked my tickets for his next tour, I can't wait to see these tracks performed live. The atmosphere will be incredible.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
First off i love Gary Numan for those spectacular early albums,for the sheer persitence of him when his career hit unimaginable lows.1992 Gary Numan was almost distressing to see,he looked beyond awful,you could virtually feel his soul die as he got interviewd on some weird show presented by the likes of Linda Lucardi.The faith and loyalty of his audience is something i respect and no one was happier when Numan emerged as key influences to young trendy artists then me.
But you know i have to take Dead Son Rising as strictly an album on its own merits,free of bias.Whilst textually its interesting there is an undeniable boredom i begin to experience whilst listening.The songs i am sure are meant to be monolithic,dark noise but it all begins to merge into a dirgey,sound almost comically "dark".Previous albums such as Exile and Pure were VAST improvements on Numans lamentable mid period career but the complete preoccupation with GOD became frankly tedious,i think Numan must have referenced god around a thousand times in his last few albums.
Kind of howling at the moon,personally for me atheists and religious people share far more in common then they would care to admit in their rigid doctrines.
I could not help think of Spinal Tap,that scene where we see there new album sleeve is all black,blacker then black.My absolute wish would be for someone like Trent Reznor to take production duties.Numan left to his own devices can be his own worst enemy.
Returning to the religion theme,i find it weird that someone who questions so many facets of god is constantly questioning and validating this figure.
Numan needs metaphor or some abstractions lyrically.To be fair Dead Son Rising doesn't feature so much about this theme.I couldn't help thinking why doesn't Numan concentrate more on soundtrack music?Ambient stuff?
I believe Gary's wife saved him from an abyss,instilling in Gary confidence and direction,far better then the woeful advice of family members,record companies etc.It is clear as day Gary and his missus kneel at the altar of Nine Inch Nails and Depeche Mode,who wouldn't?But Numan is,or sadly was,an artist of good stature in his own right.He doesn't need to do a parody of a parody.He seems to be painting himself into another box.
I want to see Numan experimenting like he did brillantly with Battles,performing savage versions of Metal with Nails not painting his fingernails black,mumbling about god on stage in a cliched cloud of smoke.
Pure served this purpose of being an industrial goth.One of the great things about Numan was how like Bowie he shifted looks,styles.Hes been doing this dark guff too long.Dead Son Rising is more a curiosity piece,i don't think i will be listening to it a lot.
BUT please know i love Gary Numan and mean no disrespect to the Numanoids out there,i just feel Numan could be doing so much more.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 31 October 2011
I missed the recent concerts promoting Dead Sun Rising and regret it, the album is Gary at his best, each track is different, theres not a Bum song and the title track is so Haunting.
This is Gary Numan
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 29 October 2011
Numan at his best. Haunting, edgy, layered (to quote fellow reviewers) and definitely one to listen to in the dark in surround sound. Can't wait.

I feel Gary is going in the right direction with this, by mixing old (post-apocolyptic) with a new,refreshing sound, appealing to both new and old Numan fans. It all gels brilliantly. It works.

Stand out tracks: Dead Sun Rising, The Fall, Big Noise Trasmission, When the Sky bleeds, We are the Lost.... The instrumentals are growing on me a bit, mainly For the rest of my life.

The chorus's are catchy, finding myself tapping my foot along, uncool I know, but I can't help it.

Hoping Splinter is going to be as good as this.

Well done Gary.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 26 October 2011
albeit a tentative one. After keeping his fans waiting for over 5 years Numan returns with this collection of reworked material, new material, and outtakes to sort of plug the gap before his next "proper" album Splinter which, he assures us, is out next year. Dead Son Rising doesn't really feel like an album proper but depite this is still a vast improvement on his previous offering, Jagged, which was one of his most forgettable efforts, a really sub-standard and repetitive Nine Inch Nails sound alike which heard him ranting on about God yet again. Thankfully on Dead Son Rising he appears to have got over, or at least reigned-in his God hate fixation and sings about some other subjects, albeit still with a biblical/apocolyptic theme. Also thankfully, the music is alot more varied, and contains some descent melodies. Big Noise Transmission, Dead Son Rising and The Fall are some of his best songs of the last 15 years and We Are The Lost is the album's standout track for me, as it fuses his new industrial sound with some of the synth based electronics he's most remembered for (more like this one please, Gary!). The instrumental tracks are rather unremarkable and feel like filler to me, and the ballad Not the Love We Dream Of is very dreary and a bit of a misfire (and we didn't need an instrumental version of it including either), but overall Dead Son Rising sees Numan showing signs of getting back on form.
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on 27 April 2014
I say that but my hubby is a fan of the person I do not like him at all. He is happy because he thought that he could not get anymore because we tryed to get it in record shops they said it not available to buy anymore so when he could get with your company he was over the moon. So yes he is very happy with the service and the seller.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 3 December 2014
If you like deep, droneful almost sad chanting (I do) the Gary is the one for you!
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 24 October 2011
Anyone who loves the apocalyptic fiction lyrics of Gary's first three albums will love this, as will those who appreciate the filmic instrumental b-sides from his big singles.

Just as Numan based the Replicas album on some short stories he'd set in a near future where machines had taken over, and Sacrifice and Exile were grown from an undeveloped plot synopsis for a novel, so Dead Son Rises evokes scenes and set pieces from a story treatment about a bleak dystopian future.

"Resurrection" is a suitably edgy mood setter leading into the first proper song, the anthemic "Big Noise Transmission".

I love the next track, "Dead Sun Rising". It has a pleasant melody and an imaginative lyric, and yet there is something spooky about it. There's a sense of the desolate barren world Numan envisions.

A similar feeling of hopelessness is evoked by "When the Sky Bleeds He Will Come".

The first of the ballads is "For the Rest of My Life". I really like this. We don't often hear Gary Numan doing tender, but this is quite touching. I don't know if he and Ade Fenton intend to release a second single, but I would suggest that if they chopped down the intro and edited in the instrumental break in the middle, this would actually be radio friendly.

At the moment, the other ballad, "Not the Love We Dream Of", doesn't quite do it for me.

Then we come to the track that has been favoured for the single, "The Fall". This was inspired by a friendship gone rotten - a person who thought Gary had maligned him (Gary says it was a misunderstanding) who went on to stir up trouble for Numan on the internet. The electronic riff is instantly appealing. The lyric is catchy, and the chorus will have you humming the melody for hours after.

"We Are the Lost" is another eerie tune, this time about the embryos of the pregnant dead being stimulated by the ghosts of those who caused the apocalypse in the first place.

The last three tracks include instrumental versions of the ballads and a piece called "Into Battle".

The record puts me in mind of the stuff I loved to listen to in my teens - lying on my bed with my earphones on, in the dark with the curtains shut. It doesn't tell a narrative as such; it conjures a desert world with ash for soil and lifeless trees.

I bought the CD/DVD package. The latter contains the promo video for "The Fall", a Making Of feature looking at the filming of the video, a lengthy interview with Numan and Fenton, a Slideshow and a Gallery.

This album has been well worth the wait.

I find it deliciously edgy.
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