Customer Reviews


69 Reviews
5 star:
 (45)
4 star:
 (18)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cracking Read
Mr Johnson has presented Fal Seelowe in a fast past blow by blow account as seen through the eye's of both German and British RAF, Luftwaffe, Homeguard, Heer etc. The premise works well and Mr. Johnson's years of service show in the exciting and believable action - stands out from other authors both of alternate history and action war novels who fall over on details such...
Published on 15 Oct 2010 by P. Brooks

versus
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A rewritting of history
The book tells the story of a German invasion of Britain in September 1940. It is told through the stories of a range of characters real and fictional that are both British and German. It is different from other similiar stories in that the Germans invade via the North Sea coast landing in Yorkshire. The story encompasses only the few days around the invasion itself...
Published on 12 Aug 2011 by Mr. C. Bennett


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cracking Read, 15 Oct 2010
By 
P. Brooks "Peter Brooks" (Manchester, England.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Mr Johnson has presented Fal Seelowe in a fast past blow by blow account as seen through the eye's of both German and British RAF, Luftwaffe, Homeguard, Heer etc. The premise works well and Mr. Johnson's years of service show in the exciting and believable action - stands out from other authors both of alternate history and action war novels who fall over on details such as weapons of the period and basic infantry practice.

I recommend this highly and will be looking out for other titles by Mr. Johnson. If I was a publisher I would grab up this author who has produced this first rate piece of alternate history fiction and gone to the effort of doing so through this "vanity publishing house".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic paced and realistic - top read, 10 Jan 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I came across this book by accident but am glad I did - the first review on here is concise so i need not get technical instead I will simply say that as a former soldier myself I found the whole thing believable and well written.

I was impressed that the story told from both sides was treated fairly and the German soldiers werent treated as the evil bogey men so writers would have us believe they were.

I totally enjoyed this book and recommend it
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


39 of 41 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cracking war story with a few slight weaknesses, 30 Jan 2011
By 
T. D. Welsh (Basingstoke, Hampshire UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
First the good news (and there is a lot of it). Andy Johnson is a fine writer with a marvellous knowledge of soldiers and soldiering. As an ex-infantryman he is naturally most at home describing war on land, and that is where the great majority of this book's action takes place. If I say that "Seeloewe Nord" stands comparison with the American authors Tom Clancy, Ralph Peters, and Harold Coyle at their best, I hope you will agree that is high praise; and it's wonderful to see such excellent story-telling from a British writer. Right from the very first sentence, we are plunged into the action as German airmen are briefed for their sorties covering the planned landings on the Yorkshire coast north of the Humber. The scene shifts excitingly between the Luftwaffe fliers, the lead elements of the German ground forces coming in secretly to capture crucial defensive strongpoints, the local Home Guard, and the British top brass in Whitehall as they struggle to understand the unfolding German strategy, and hastily plan a defence in depth and a sledgehammer counterattack.

This is by no means a short book - it runs to nearly 500 pages - yet I found it very hard to put down, and wished it was longer when I reached the end. The tension builds up as we look over the shoulders of the general staffs on both sides, and wonder which of them will prevail. Some of the characters - especially Sergeant Davy Jackson of the Coldstream Guards - engage our sympathies very strongly as their personalities emerge and take shape. After a while you feel you know what Sergeant ("not Sarge!") Jackson would say or do in a given situation.

Unfortunately there are a few flaws as well, and as none of the previous reviewers have mentioned them (as far as I recall) I feel I should. The book's shortcomings are of three main kinds, the first of which is perhaps forgivable if not inevitable: the British are shown in a uniformly good light, and the Germans in a bad one. Now it is certainly true that, as of 1940, well-commanded British troops could hold their own against Germans and even give them a good hiding. Moreover, as was shown at Arras, the Matilda II tank could cut right through the German Army's Panzer IIIs and IVs like a knife through butter: its armour was almost impenetrable except by the 88 mm dual-purpose gun, which was far too heavy to be brought in large numbers by an invasion force, while its gun could destroy all German tanks at medium range. Nevertheless, most German troops were highly disciplined, strongly motivated, and (surprisingly perhaps) able to show a greater degree of initiative than those of other armies. The Waffen-SS, while in its early days, was already shaping up as an elite force capable of the most astonishing feats of attack and defence. So I found it hard to believe some of the episodes of infantry fighting, accurate though the technical details might be.

Things get worse when it comes to naval warfare. The author has either done his research diligently or obtained expert advice, but it goes only so far. We are told that the Home Fleet, led by HMS Hood, Valiant and Renown with the aircraft carrier HMS Furious in company, joins a World War I-type line-of-battle engagement with the German heavy ships "Hipper, Gneisenau, Scharnhorst, Nurnberg and Koln, backed by around five destroyers". Moreover, the German ships actually attack the British! Now Hood, Valiant and Renown all mounted 15-inch guns (over 20 of them in all) a single hit from which could have done severe damage to Scharnhorst or Gneisenau and crippled or destroyed the smaller German ships. Not one of those five was designed (or able) to trade blows with a battleship, let alone three of them. Indeed on the one occasion when they really did meet, Scharnhorst and Gneisenau ran away from Renown on her own! And the light cruisers Nurnberg and Koln would normally have avoided engaging any British cruiser - they were designed for scouting and attacking light ships such as destroyers.

My last objection is that this book desperately needs the attention of a professional editor. I don't want to push this too far, as the author modestly notes that all errors are entirely his own - and moreover, as far as I recall none of the other reviewers has even mentioned this shortcoming, suggesting that it didn't detract from their enjoyment of the book. I'm afraid that poor spelling and other solecisms did rather spoil it for me, but then maybe I'm too pedantic. But judge for yourself: for the first half of the book U-boat captain Prien, famous for sinking the battleship Royal Oak in Scapa Flow, is consistently referred to as "Prein". Then suddenly the author starts to get it right, and does so for the last couple of hundred pages. This is just one of dozens of mistakes that litter the pages of this otherwise admirable book, and which a copy editor would have removed with ease.

Don't let any of my criticisms deter you from reading "Seeloewe Nord", however. It's a cracking good war story, and fills in a mass of details about what a German invasion in 1940 would really have been like. If it seems implausible or impractical, the author makes it perfectly clear in his Foreword that he doesn't claim otherwise; he asks the reader "to take the book for what it is; a story of fighting men".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nord goes South at the end, 4 Jun 2011
I loved the first 3 quarters of this book, Andy has crafted a great story with an unusual twist on the invation of Britain. i followed the charactors and the action at great pace, a page turner, i loved the action on the beaches and the streets of Britian, but then the last quarter was a real let down. British tanks suddenly become invinceable and the real killers of the early years suddenly are forgoten, the 88mm. I know this is fiction but the lessons of France just seem to have been forgoten. That said the book is worth a read, i enjoyed it!

Please excuse the spelling, always a bag idea to write after a bottle of wine, only my opinion.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping alternative history, 31 Mar 2011
By 
C. N. Braid "Chris" (Llanelli) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The proposed German invasion of britain in 1940 has engendered plenty of 'what ifs' Few of them novels. This fine book redresses the balance. The main characters, both historical and fictional; Britsh and German are introduced quickly but are all well rounded and far from superficially treated. Then we get into the action. An what action. It is relentless and it is clear that the author (an ex-squadddie like myself) knows both the period and the terryfing thrill of warfare.
Could have done with some tighter editing and spell-checking, but well worth 4 stars.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I should have hated this book, 16 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Seel÷we Nord (Kindle Edition)
I really should have hated it a lot. It is littered with typos, sloppy grammar, factual errors (8.8cm rounds bouncing off Matilda IIs; Germany having enough bathtubs to land 6 divisions in Yorkshire in Sept 1940, British and German soldiers using 1990s NATO slang) and jingoism. The latter stretches to elitism, with only Guards regiments mentioned by name; 'Fish & Chips' units get made-up names like the '5th Loamshires'. As in Johnson's other books the Guards save the day by being rock hard and dead good at stamping their feet. And it really needed some maps. BUT! I loved it. It's almost all about fighting and it cracks along. Just accept that it's candyfloss level war porn and you could love it too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Good, 28 Mar 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A good read the book is from Soldiers points of view enjoyed this book a lot
Only spoiled by the format so Hate these big paperbacks
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well researched and knowledgable, 26 Feb 2011
130 pages in the first sitting, more sleepless hours waiting for me.
A well thought out story with action scenes that drag you into the plot deeper and deeper by the page.
The only problem with this book is its missing maps.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Operation Sealion, by gum it's grim oop north, 2 Jun 2010
By 
Andy Johnson is a retired professional soldier, and his experience and expertise shines through on every page. There is already a small number of fictional accounts of the proposed German invasion of the UK in 1940, Fall Seelowe, or Operation Sealion, but Andy Johnson has managed to create a credible new scenario, by shifting the invasion away from Kent and Sussex, northwards to the coast of Yorkshire. In researching his novel, he has obviously walked the ground and looked closely at the lie of the land so these accurate descriptions of the various locations chosen for the actions depicted brings a much appreciated credence to the whole account. Alternately shifting from groups of German soldiers to their British counterparts, this is no jingoistic tract, but a considered account of mainly infantry warfare up close and personal. Even the deliberations of both High Commands are included, and the portrait of General Alan Brooke is particularly good.
With any work of this nature, some supposition is necessary and the only major divergence is providing the German forces with dedicated Tank and indeed Infantry Landing Craft that they did not possess, but it's such a good tale I'll forgive Johnson that. In addition he borrows from the Pearl Harbour scenario, ( the US Carriers were absent and so escaped damage or destruction ) and here the RN's carrier is absent from Scapa Flow, and so evades the U-Boat blockade.
Although I know the area of the action well, I still had to resort to my map collection to fully appreciate the action at times. The lack of maps in the book is the only lapse with which I can find fault.
This is highly enjoyable and eminently readable account of a different take on Sealion. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read, 30 Dec 2010
By 
David Holden (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I received the book as a Christmas present and could hardly put it down. I'd second most of the previous positive comments but agree that a map would have been useful.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Seel÷we Nord
Seelöwe Nord by Andy Johnson
ú3.04
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews