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42 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "...The Step Between Ecstatic Vision And Sinful Frenzy Is All Too Brief..." - The Name Of The Rose on BLU RAY
*** THIS REVIEW IS FOR THE 2011 BLU RAY VERSION ***

French Director Jean-Jacques Annaud had his work cut out for him. First he had to hire BAFTA-winning writer Andrew Birkin along with three other top scriptwriters to do a 'Pamplifest' of "Il Nome Della Rose" - a 500-page medieval whodunit written in Italian by Historian and Scholar Umberto Eco. Then after four...
Published on 27 Jan. 2012 by Mark Barry

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars on the plus side, sean connery; on the minus, glacial pacing
It's always a pleasure to watch Sean Connery on the screen, an actor who seems always to enjoy what he's doing and who knows his strengths and limitations as an actor, and who is especially good when his character has a bit of histrionic flair in him, as is the case here. Throw in F. Murray Abraham, Ron Perlman, and some good European actors, and the brew looks potent...
Published 4 months ago by Stanley Crowe


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5.0 out of 5 stars Out of this world, 30 Oct. 2012
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The film version (1986) of Umberto Ecco's novel `The Name of the Rose' does it more than justice. Of course, it does not examine Medieval Scholasticism and the influence of Aristotle as much as the novel. Here it's but the background to a series of murders. Nor does it deal with the conflict between the Spiritual Franciscans and the Avignonese Papacy in the early 14th century but that adds tension external to the solution of the crime. But it does include the baleful presence of the real-life Dominican Inquisitor, Bernardo Gui, author of "Conduct of the Inquisition into Heretical Wickedness'. He also wrote about the Dolcinites who are given a hyper-Anarchist flavour in the forms of the film's Salvatore (Ron Perlman) and Remigio (Helmut Qualtinger).
From the haunting opening music and the sudden appearance of the bare landscape of northern Italy you are transported into the early 14th century world. Note the contrast between the secure, if austere, world of a Benedictine abbey and the survival struggle facing the surrounding peasantry, still expected to offer tithes. But even this is paled by the arrival of Bernardo Gui (magnificently played by F. Murray Abraham) with military escort and even more by that of the Papal negotiator. The abbey has within its walls as guests a group of Franciscans - ignoring the historical clash between Benedictines and Franciscans at the time - for a conference, which is joined by William of Baskerville (Sean Connery) and his acolyte, Adso of Melk (Christian Slater), through whose eyes the story is told. A series of incidents illustrate wrath,, greed, sloth, pride, lust, envy, and gluttony (the Seven Deadly Sins) and I invite you to pin such sins on characters in the film - for example, William of Baskerville demonstrates wrath, greed, pride and envy. Deaths are grisly, sex is hot and cruelty extreme is a film which can rivals `The Devils'(1971) , at times, for sheer nastiness. But don't let me put you off. If you want an introduction to the debate on Spiritual Poverty or how Aristotle swept aside much of the work of the Early Fathers (and unmentioned Plato) then this film is useful. If you want the excitement of the chase or the frustration of injustice this film does the job. If you want just a good mystery set in a quagmire of red herrings, this film should do.
Connery and Abraham are, as expected, brilliant - as is Feodor Challapin (Father Jorge); Christian Slater, Michael Lonsdale (Abbot) and William Hickey(Ubertino) are good; but admire the NON-VERBAL magnetic performance of Valentina Vargas (The Girl) - for me only rivalled by that of Sam Phillips in `Die Hard 3' (1995). Direction is good and the photography superb - especially close-ups on an amazingly grotesque cast.
Questionable points? For those who like a simple tale of violence there is too much discussion of abstract ideas alien to 21st century thinking. The Macguffin, to modern ideas, appears ridiculous and to appreciate it you have to tap into the medieval mind - and, perhaps, thereby your own age better. To me. With a background in medieval history, it is an excellent film, well worth five stars.
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5.0 out of 5 stars They believed in God, but traded with the Devil, 28 April 2012
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Adapted from renowned Italian historian Umberto Eco's first novel and set in a medieval Italian monastary, this movie has all the suspense of a modern whodunnit but set against an authentic looking backdrop of the time it was set. It also deals with the issues of the time highlighting the depravity and hypocracy which goes some way to explaining modern society's attitude towards religion in general.
Excellent performance from Sean Connery as the highly intelligent detective Monk and an equally good early performance from a young Christian Slater as the eager, willing and humanly flawed pupil to Sean Connery's wise teacher.Slater is also confused about his calling and his feelings towards a local peasent girl,Also look out for Ron Pearlman of Hellboy fame in a role as a heritic hunchback.
The film is beautifully set in an Italian monestry that looks like it is straight out of the 14th century,The film is an excellent twist on a murder mystery It's the work of the Devil. That's what some say when a bizarre series of deaths strikes a 14th-century monastery. Others find links between the deaths and the book of Revelation. But Brother William of Baskerville thinks otherwise. He intends to find a murderer by using fact and reason, the tools of heresy.
The film is very realistic in every way the cold,uncomfortable monastery; the graphic murders; grotesque and disfigured characters;a startlingly explicit sex scene; authentic-sounding dialogue; excellent indoor and outdoor locations; and well-researched costume designs. Furthermore, it is a superbly paced film.
directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud, with his masterful adaptation of this book wisely retains some of the novel's elements, and transmutes others into terms far better suited to the medium of film. Annaud creates the milieu of the monastery, bleak, dank, claustrophobic, almost drained of life, brilliantly.filled with remarkable performances an indelible visions.
It doesn't get much better than this? This is an Excellent and so Fascinating I can only say it is A flawless film.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Mystery, 31 July 2011
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C M Cotton "Chris Cotton" (Europe and USA) - See all my reviews
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I first saw this film on BBC2 and thought it such a great film I bought the video and then the DVD. It stars Sean Connery and a young Christian Slater. It is set in a 14th Century Italian monastery where unexplained, evil and murderous happenings are taking place. Connery plays the part of Brother William, a kind of 14th century Sherlock Holmes, who attempts to solve the various murders before the inquisition arrives, by using his non conformist intellect. Through use of deduction and reasoning Bother William untangles various sub plots to get to who killed who and why. This logic is then ignored when Gui of the inquisition arrives and decides upon more a more sinister line of devil worship and satanic forces, as the reason for the murders. The climax of the film is gripping and needless to say right, triumphs over evil.

The plot and story line is gripping. It had me guessing until the very end. What makes this a great film is the cinematography, locations and acting. Connery is superb as the sometimes child like detective Monk. Slater is fantastic as Connery's novice. The directing of the film, the sets and of course the scripts all perfectly intermingle to make you feel a part of a 14th century Italian monastery. It has the most incredible atmospheric feel, even though the external shots of the monastery were actually studio shots according to IMDB.

If you are looking for a great who dunnit, with a plot that will keep you gripped to the end of the film, then this is the film for you. Great acting, directing, scripts and sets all add to make this film one of the best Connery films I have seen. Highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Atmospheric, 24 Feb. 2011
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Mr. P. G. Mccarthy (Southampton, UK) - See all my reviews
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The strength of this film is the dark brooding atmosphere it creates. The location is perfect and really captures the mood of the book. It doesn't follow the same sequence of events as the book, nor does it include the long debates and `disputations' over what Aristotle or Thomas Aquinas might have said (and how could it?) but does have the same relentless sense of terrifying mystery. The book raises some serious and apparently irresolvable religious issues where the distinction between holiness and evil utterly breaks down; the film can only hint at this but it does come across in such comments as the one about the fine line between religious ecstasy and bestiality, as well as the dubious motives of the medieval inquisition.

Brother William of Baskerville (clearly based on Sherlock Holmes) is unlike any of the other characters in the film. In a sense he seems to be a thoroughly modern man that has found himself among medieval monks. Medieval thought can seem overly rational, even if it is used to demonstrate the truth of counter-intuitive propositions; but Bother William's intellectual approach is more deductive and reflects a positivism that clearly post-dates the world he has found himself in.

Sean Connery does a good job as William, as does the constantly confused and bewildered Christian Slater as the young novice Adso. The supporting cast, although not easy on the eye, are brilliant too, especially the hunchbacked Salvatore.

Fans of the book probably won't rate this film highly; it would tend to be too much of a whistle-stop tour. Apart from this issue the film is a treat and worth keeping in your own personal library.
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5.0 out of 5 stars middle ages who-dunnit, 28 Feb. 2011
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W. A. Armstrong "W.Armstrong" (North East England) - See all my reviews
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Probably one of Connerys best movies (The man who would be King, aside ) In the Middle ages when the Christian church was splintered into various factions , each at war with the other, a meeting is organized to bring together the different groups so that common ground may be found, instead a series of unexplained and grizzly murders take place that threatens to de-rail the meeting and its up to Connery and his young novice ( Christian Slater ) to solve the crimes before the arrival of the all powerful Inquisitor (F.Murray Abraham ) an old adversary of Connery from his secretive past before he became a monk. Some great twists and turns along the way to discovering the true identity of the murderer and some excellent character acting throughout this ensemble cast ( Ron Pearlman being of note ) A well written story leads to a great set-piece ending . Some great cinematography of the foreboding monastery and the bleak surrounding italian hillsides , let down only slightly by a bad matte painting of the cathedral from a distance. But this is nit picking - if you like murder mysteries then this is the one to watch.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very deep, strange film, 7 May 2012
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A. Pechabadens "Alexandra Pechabadens" (Pays-de-Galles - Uk) - See all my reviews
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A dark film but which is extremely good, and ends well.
A mysterious movie, which always drew me though I coudln't explain why: my boyfriend didn't understand what I like so much about it, and nor could I. It just is a really good film, and took me back in those times. Great even though dark, but it is 'bearably' dark, not 'depressing' dark.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Yet to be bettered., 9 July 2015
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The idea of casting Sean Connery as a 14th century, Franciscan monk, sounds like something cooked up by Hollywood executives at 3am, whilst up to their eyeballs on Columbian marching powder. And yet, they did it, and the result is one of the best films of the 1980s.

Dodgy accents aside, Connery impresses as a Medieval detective, a sort of Cadfael, before Cadfael hit British TV screens, as he investigates a series of grisly murders. Guided by the principles of Occam's razor, and curios about knowledge from the Classical world, Connery's curiosity gets the better of him, as he encounters hidden books, and mad monks, in this adaption of Umberto Eco's classic novel.

Chuck in a mad director, a prima donna Oscar winner (F Murray Abraham), a naïve side-kick (Christian Slater with a dodgy mullet) and some unsettling, and unforgettable locations, and you have an intriguing mystery, packed with dark themes, and redemption.

They have yet to better this.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The dark ages, 3 May 2015
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This review is from: The Name Of The Rose (1986) (Blu-ray) (Region 2) (Import) (Blu-ray)
Sean Connery channeling Cadfael is a 14th Century monk investigating heresy and later, much worse. Monks in movies and on TV have either been pious men working hard for the good of the community, or politicos looking after their own self interests. Sean Connery is the man of the people intent on investigating an abbey full of the latter type. The oppressive gloom of the abbey and the prevailing sense that something more is wrong with everyone in it settles in and really never lets up. A sense of direction and clear purpose are often lacking, we get events but nothing clear to link them together. A really great try at a very difficult book. Never have the dark ages seemed so very, very dark.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bargain Buy, 25 Mar. 2012
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This DVD was an absolute steal at just over £3, another excellent Sean Connery performance in a film which gives you all the action from the book but weeds out the less intesting parts.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A medieval, monastic murder mystery, starring Sean Connery supported by a cast of proto mafia monks, set in visual splendour. Wa, 29 April 2015
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Set in a medieval monastery in the Alpine foothills, this is a visually breathtaking production of sinister mystery. A series of deaths are linked to the presence of evil stalking the ancient cloisters, and Benedictine detective brother William, Sean Connery, is a fortuitous visitor. His investigations, assisted by his apprentice a teenage Christian Bale, are hampered at every turn by a group of recalcitrant monks, the whole mess furthered stirred by the arrival of the Grand Inquisitor, Murray Abraham. A thriller, each character a vivid portrait, each scene a visual delight.
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