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50 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great music, but i can not hear the difference
Now first of all the Division bell for me is the best Gilmour led pink Floyd album, and i personally feel has not dated like the over blown Momentary lapse of reason. There are many musical highlights including High hopes, and Rick Wrights wearing the inside out. This album was originally recorded digitally so I was wondering what else could be achieved from the original...
Published on 26 Sep 2011 by Mr. R. G. Prizeman

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Great Box Set with flaws.
I really enjoy this album in its musical content and the box set is filled with heaps of goodies but there are IMO two big drawbacks that make the normal purchaser shy away from this box set. 1. The price. The Amazon UK issue is almost 50% more expensive than the Amazon US version. The only explanation is that greed would have to be the driving force for the enormous...
Published 17 days ago by B. Perham


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50 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great music, but i can not hear the difference, 26 Sep 2011
By 
Mr. R. G. Prizeman "Dickie 1" (croydon UK) - See all my reviews
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Now first of all the Division bell for me is the best Gilmour led pink Floyd album, and i personally feel has not dated like the over blown Momentary lapse of reason. There are many musical highlights including High hopes, and Rick Wrights wearing the inside out. This album was originally recorded digitally so I was wondering what else could be achieved from the original mater. I received the knew discovery version, an the first thing is the annoying paper sleeve and tried to remove the Cd without making any marks on it, almost impossible I hate those sleeves. Anyway i placed the CD on my Naim Cd Played and played What do you want from me, I then played the original, sound difference i could not tell, there appears to be no increase in volume which is good, but I just can not hear any difference in sound. Now I think maybe its because this was recorded so well that not much can be gained, which may explain why it was not remastered last time around. There is nothing extra in the booklet, and as for the album replica sleeve, why, this was bought by most people me included on CD originally. So if your a fan like me maybe, but seriously no change in sound at all
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High Hopes: The Division Bell Vinyl 2014, 15 July 2014
By 
P. Kelly (UK) - See all my reviews
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I had very 'high hopes' for this album release being on heavy weight vinyl over two records and it does not disappoint, absolute brilliant release. I still have my original copy but although the album itself was very well recorded, I was disappointed with the quality of the vinyl (had notable background noise in certain places from new: probably just unlucky).

The 2014 version is pressed on 2 X 194g vinyl (my copy weights) with heavy-weight cardboard cover and the records are housed in cardboard sleeves. No title on the front or lyric sheet sleeve as with my original. A little disappointing the lyric sheet is absent and assume you need to get the expensive box set to have this.

The records are perfectly flat and there is no detectable background noise. Really a wonderful pressing, I wish all new releases displayed this level of quality.

Compared to my original:

Record is louder on the same amp setting.
Sound-stage is more detailed, instruments and vocals have more clarity and space.
More defined bass (low end frequency) without any loss in high end frequency (certainly no detectable compression).
Lower back-ground noise from new, I think a better quality vinyl used,
Also the tracks are longer (spread out over 2 records), which is positive but personally it's not the major factor here for me.

In conclusion: a great reissue, sonic-wise in my opinion better than the original and therefore highly recommended. I am slightly disappointed that there is no lyric sheet included for the price but the quality of the pressing and music makes up for this. So no need to go looking for expensive second hand vinyl copies of the original, this is a brilliant release.
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34 of 39 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Converted, (I think), after 8 years !, 11 Mar 2002
This review is from: The Division Bell (Audio CD)
I have always ignored this album and its earlier brother, MLOR. To me Pink Floyd WAS Roger Waters, I loved Rogers solo albums; Radio Kaos, Pros & Cons.. & the amazing Amused To Death. I could not imagine Pink Floyd having much to say without Rogers awesome lyric writing & vocal style. Its now 2002, and after reading a few reviews on here, I thought 'OK, I'll give it a try'. I listened to the Division Bell with a sense of already knowing I wouldn't like it........You know what ?......It really ain't all bad! There are heavy overtones of Wish You Were Here, The Wall, Animals & Dark Side, which are quite blatant, but the overall view after listening was one of mellow satisfaction. The music flows through your head like sweet nectar, close your eyes, and you're in a 'comfortably numb' heaven.
I've now ordered MLOR, and hoping for more of the same. Wish You Were Here/The Wall it ain't........but if you've been like me and avoided it.....give it a go....could be an eye opener!
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Last Blast of Greatness, 10 Sep 2003
By 
N. S. Rushton (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Division Bell (Audio CD)
Trawling back over the great period of rock musical history (1966-1976), during which I was unfortunate enough to be too young to appreciate/experience any of it, one of the first stops had to be Pink Floyd. Sure enough, after listening properly to 'Wish You Were Here' and 'Dark Side of the Moon' it soon became apparent that this band were responsible for a myriad of copyists and were a huge influence on many of the bands that I grew up with in the 80s (especially Fields of the Nephilim). Delving further into the history of the band it soon became apparent that after Syd Barrett was ejected in 1967 PF was a construct of Roger Waters and Dave Gilmour -- both evidently geniuses, but with personalities that gradually drifted apart. So after 'The Final Cut' in 1983 Waters left Gilmour to carry on the mantle of PF. With 'A Momentary Lapse of Reason' in 1987 Gilmour proved that he was as much of a miserable old codger as Waters when it came to songwriting (miserable in a good way you understand), but it is with 'The Division Bell' (1994) that Gilmour suggests (gasp) that he's actually a BETTER songwriter than Waters. There is not a weak track on this album -- even the saxaphone (usually an instrument that sounds the death knell for any song on which it appears) on 'Wearing the Inside Out' sounds good. 'Cluster One' and 'Marooned' are instrumentals laced with dark, broody atmospherics, while special highlights are 'What do you want from me', 'Lost for Words' and 'High Hopes'. The sound as a whole is like a Keats poem: sumptuous, luxurious and all invasive. It's different than the Pink Floyd of the seventies, and could not have existed without the band's development during that time, but Gilmour has produced here a (presumably) last blast of greatness from one of the most influential bands to ever walk the planet.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gilmour's monument, 26 Sep 2011
By 
Mark A. Burt "mark79724" (Paisley) - See all my reviews
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Back in 94 even i couldn't have believed what i was about to listen to. Gilmour grabs the b ull by the horns and delivers what is up there with Floyd's best, yes the purists will scoff because of their being no Waters, but i couldn't care less. This is Gilmour's album and in my opinion the best work he has done This new remastered release adds a crispness and vitality missing from the original recording. Essential Floyd listening.
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37 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!!!!!, 3 Oct 2003
This review is from: The Division Bell (Audio CD)
This has to go down as one of the best Floyd albums ever written. Dating from 1994 well after the departure of Roger Waters, this is the second studio album with David Gilmour as the lead man. It is the heavy side of Pink Floyd with all guitars , drums and Daves powerful voice blazing away.
The opening track is an instrumental - Cluster 1, very keyboard orientated, leads nicely into 'What do you want from me'. You suddenly realize why you bought this album when the guitar solo starts- for me thats the beauty of Pink Floyd the guitar solos from Dave Gilmour. This song is very hard-hitting with its powerful lyrics.
A slightly more swing style is adopted in Poles Apart. Following this is the magnificent Marooned. I first heard this moving instrumental on Echoes- the best of P.F., in an abbreviated form. What you've got here is a piece to move you to tears.
A great day for freedom is not one of the best tracks on the album, but makes way for possibly my favourite- Wearing the inside out. This emotional ballad- like piece, with its moaning saxophone and haunting lyrics is one that not everyone will enjoy- but definately my favourite.
A more commercial stance is taken on the next track- Take it back, with a song that could have come out of U2's back catalogue. This segues into the gentle 'Coming back to life'. Another maybe more familiar track is Keep Talking- another classic rock song with a touch of genius by adding Steven Hawking to add naration.
This is then followed by Lost for words- maybe the best song on the album. Its not got heavy guitars and the chord sequence is simple but what a tune and great lyrics- you'll be singing this wherever you go.
The last song is a great way to end the album. High hopes is again powerful and thought-provoking.
This album is best listened to in the evening with the lights off, to chill out to. Perfect music.
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30 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dont knock it - genuine class, 10 Jun 2006
By 
Peter Brunskill "petertheclaret" (West Yorkshire UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Division Bell (Audio CD)
Yes its post Waters and very different from the Syd era, but still the Floyd album I listen to when I really want a musical kick in the teeth.

Some splendid moments both musically and lyrically, it finishes on a real high. SO just open your mind to post-Waters Floyd, and if your friends tell you different, maybe you just can't win.

Couldn't imagine leaving any of this off my iPod!
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28 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece., 8 Oct 2005
By 
This review is from: The Division Bell (Audio CD)
Momentary Lapse may not have been a masterpiece, but it was a perfectly passable 80s rock album. It took the Floyd three years of touring and four years of fannying around to get The Division Bell out - worth the wait?
Absolutely.
It doesn't make sense, really; the creative genius Roger Waters leaves the band, and somehow the Floyd MkIII put together an album this good. While lyrically it's not quite up to standard, the music is some of the most beautifull atmospheric the Floyd ever wrote and shows that the musical talent in the band lay with Rick Wright and David Gilmour; Waters just wrote great songs.
The highlights are too many to mention, but High Hopes is undoubtedly the best song of the post-Waters wilderness years; Coming Back To Life is somewhat hilariously led by a cowbell yet would feel incomplete without it, and Lost For Words proves that Waters isn't the only one who can throw in a gratuitous f-word and make it work.
This album is far, far better than it has any right to be. Buy it and be amazed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Great Box Set with flaws., 13 July 2014
By 
B. Perham (Brisbane, QLD, Australia) - See all my reviews
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I really enjoy this album in its musical content and the box set is filled with heaps of goodies but there are IMO two big drawbacks that make the normal purchaser shy away from this box set. 1. The price. The Amazon UK issue is almost 50% more expensive than the Amazon US version. The only explanation is that greed would have to be the driving force for the enormous difference in price. 2. The DVD that is included in the box set is Blu-ray so unless you have a Blu-ray player you miss out on seeing the video / Blu-ray music content as well. A smaller detraction is that the audio download is not seamless like the CD versions are so that there is a distinct pause between tracks as the music stops and then starts again for the tracks that 'run into each other'. Other than that the vinyl is high quality and the art work is fantastic also.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Very Competent Album, 9 May 2014
By 
Mr. Peter Steward "petersteward" (Norwich, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Division Bell (Audio CD)
The Floyd's final studio album wasn't treated too well by the critics who perhaps were expecting or looking for a return to the glory days. That simply wasn't going to happen post Roger Waters. But the fact is that this is more than a competent album full of Floyd trademarks and far more highs than lows. Indeed it has the feel of a very together album with some beautiful guitar work and some interesting lyrics. What Do You Want From Me? is seemingly about a relationship but could just as easily be a song about Waters and his relationship with individual members of the band.

Perhaps it is the wailing guitars on Poles Apart and the instrumental Marooned that is the trademark of the album as a whole. Then there are two of the bands most endearing songs in "Keep Talking" with the Steven Hawking introduction and the final track High Hopes which has always been one of my favourite Floyd tracks. In fact this is more soulful than many Floyd albums. There are no bad tracks and I do rate it highly and certainly on a par with Meddle and Atom Heart Mother.
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