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74 of 76 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stand in the fireplace, between the speakers ... go on!
First I bought this album on 8-track (that would have been about 1972 or 73), then LP, then cassette, now CD. I must like it. First time I heard it my friend Kathy grabbed me by the elbow as I walked past her room and said stand there, in the fireplace, between the speakers and listen to this. It was "One of These Days". It was loud enough to cause brain damage. I'm...
Published on 10 Jun 2004 by Sally-Anne

versus
8 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great at the time
This album was the start of the Floyd phenomenon (commercially speaking), moving away from the psychedelia & popish toons under the new influence of Dave Gilmour.

It was interesting at the time of the release because whilst at school most of my musically-orientated mates were into the psychedelic Barrett Floyd & subsequently most 6th formers (inc me) got into...
Published on 16 Jan 2009 by Ken Grew


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74 of 76 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stand in the fireplace, between the speakers ... go on!, 10 Jun 2004
By 
Sally-Anne "mynameissally" (Leicestershire, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Meddle (Audio CD)
First I bought this album on 8-track (that would have been about 1972 or 73), then LP, then cassette, now CD. I must like it. First time I heard it my friend Kathy grabbed me by the elbow as I walked past her room and said stand there, in the fireplace, between the speakers and listen to this. It was "One of These Days". It was loud enough to cause brain damage. I'm still a bit deaf and never came out of the altered state. It was just (excuse the expression) mind-blowing. We were too primitive back then to own a set of head phones so the experience of the jet of sound squirting right through the middle of my head, from one ear to the other then back again, was like a new revelation - the sort of thing that hippies were guzzling all sorts of expensive substances in order to achieve. Then some creep said he was going to cut me into little pieces. Unusual lyrics too and a far from sensual singing voice, as befits a psycho. Never heard the like before!
"One of These Days" was enough on its own to sell the album to me. But every number was a shiny gem (varying degrees of brightness). It's been a star in my music collection for 3 decades. It's music like this that slows the onset of old age (or at least maturity in my case). Even my dogs like it. One of them likes to howl along with Seamus.
This is special. If you haven't heard it, you should seek it out and discover that it's something you wouldn't have wanted to miss.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "...I'll Climb That Hill In My Own Way...", 27 Sep 2011
By 
Mark Barry "Mark Barry" - See all my reviews
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*** THIS REVIEW IS FOR THE 2011 VERSION ***

I've just come from reviewing the 2011 remaster of Pink Floyd's "Obscured By Clouds" (the album that followed "Meddle" in June 1972) - which is sonically amazing - but is also disappointingly skimpy on the packaging front (a miniscule 8-page booklet). It's pretty much an identical story here. But to the details first...

Released 30 October 1971 on Harvest Records SMAS-832 in the USA and 13 November 1971 in the UK on Harvest Records SHVL 795 - original UK copies of the vinyl LP came in an untitled textured gatefold sleeve. American issues were titled and featured reversed artwork on a hard-card sleeve - the back of the UK cover put on the front. This 26 September 2011 version (27 Sep 2011 in the USA) on EMI 50999 028942 2 5 is a straightforward 6-track remaster of that studio album and comes in a gatefold card sleeve (using UK artwork) with a 12-page colour inlay inside (total playing time 48:51 minutes).

Like all the other albums in this 14-title reissue series - "Meddle" has been mastered by JAMES GUTHRIE and JOEL PLANTE at the Das Boot Recording Studios in Tahoe in California (Guthrie is a Sound Engineer associated with the band since 1978). The original 1st generation master tapes have obviously been given a thorough going over because it truly feels like each song has had a staggering amount of time spent on them worrying out every single nuance possible. The audio result is truly impressive.

On the 1995 remaster the six-minute opener "One Of These Days" took ages to arrive and even when it did it was somehow dull and lacklustre. How things have changed - when the huge synth riff kicks in about 2:50 on this 2011 version - the sound is incredibly clear - allowing you to hear crashes and bangs going on in the background that I've never heard before. Then the sort of Piltdown Man voice says "One Of These Days I'm Gonna Cut You Into Little Pieces..." and all Hell breaks loose - Gilmour's guitar indeed sounding like a musical chainsaw. It's revelatory genius and in that uniquely peculiar Pink Floyd kind of a way.

But even that is trumped by the awesome clarity of the forgotten and hugely underrated "A Pillow Of Winds". Put simply - it sounds 'beautiful'. The jaunty "San Tropez" and the rather pointless ditty that is "Seamus" are both the same - so clear and renewed. The 23:25 minute Side 2 opus "Echoes" has hiss as it opens on sonar pings - but luckily Guthrie and Plante have allowed it to breath instead of using some no-noise dampening technique. So when the funky break takes place at about seven minutes (now being used by Dance DJs in the UK as a mix in sets) it sounds just HUGE. It's impressive stuff, it really is.

But on this album my heart has always been with "Fearless" - issued as a B-side to "One Of These Days" in the USA and other European territories. It seems like I've waited literally 40 whole years to hear this fabulous song in such clarity (lyrics above). It's a genuine wow - and reminds me of a club I used to go to in Dublin called The Grove in the Seventies when they actually used this song as a 'lurch' (a slow tune in Ireland). As it fades out to the Liverpool Football Club fans singing "You'll Never Walk Alone" (a no.1 UK hit for Gerry & The Pacemakers in 1963 and adopted by them as an anthem) - I'm in floods...

I wish I could say the same for the staggeringly unimaginative packaging. The 'Pink Floyd' logo you see in all the photos advertising these new reissues turns out to be a sticker on the outer shrink-wrap that gets lost the second you unpeel it. The card sleeves are like The Beatles 09/09/09 EMI reissues - glossy and flimsy - so they smudge with finger prints the second you open them and are easy to bend and crease. The CD itself has new generic artwork that's repeated in different colour variations throughout the series - a sort of Turquoise and Pale Green for "Meddle", a garish Red and Pink for "Obscured By Clouds" etc. It has no relevance to the original albums whatsoever (where's the original Harvest label they've used on other reissues or the colourful inner bag?) but also has no protective gauze sleeve so it will scuff on repeated plays.

But the skimpy booklet is the biggest disappointment. Although it has the lyrics (like this is a major improvement) it seems little different to the 1995 issue. It has no history on the album, pictures of European and Worldwide 7" sleeves, the different US artwork etc. OK - it does look nice and does the job adequately - but that's all. It's a lazy-assed approach on behalf of EMI and undermines the sterling work done on the sound front. I hate to come across like some nick-picking fan boy here, but it would have been nice to actually 'discover' something on this so-called 'Discovery' version (docked a star for that). And there are no outtakes either...and man would they have been worth a listen.

To sum up - we finally get five-star sound - but it's housed in 3-star presentation. Still - with the truly beautiful sonic upgrade, the casual listener is advised to dig in, rediscover and enjoy.

Die-hard fans however might want to wait for the Japanese Editions that will inevitably arrive in 2012 on the far superior SHM-CD format (a better make of CD playable on all players). With their faithfully reproduced artwork and audiophile reproduction - they may give your bank manager a cold sweat - but they will absolutely be the ones to get if the best is all you'll accept.

"Meddle" is a gem in the Pink Floyd canon and on the strength of this remaster alone - I'm going to have to buy the new "Dark Side Of The Moon " and "Wish You Were Here" versions too. I suspect many will feel exactly the same...
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A ground-breaking and breath-taking album, 14 Sep 2005
This review is from: Meddle (Audio CD)
This is the last Floyd album written before those which were based on alienation and struggle. In comparison it has a joyful feeling overall.
The first half has a diverse selection of pieces: One of These Days is very brooding, A Pillow of Winds is quite light and refreshing, San Tropez is very laid back, Fearless is invigorating (especially for Liverpool fans) and Seamus is just a bit of fun.
The second half consists of the superb Echoes, a rock symphony that leads us enchantingly from the sub-marine to the sublime. Bathe in its deep, warm ambience and drift away! This is their first and arguably their best masterpiece.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Replaced after, almost, 40 years, 19 July 2013
By 
Dave M (Hampshire, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Meddle [2011 - Remaster] (2011 - Remaster) (MP3 Download)
I friend of mine bought Dark Side of the Moon, it was great and, as a result, I bought this as my first ever real LP (having had things like "Music for Pleasure" before then, if you remember that).

The original LP has long since warped, but I still have and treasure it, but the music just had to be replaced.

Enough of the personal reminiscences, now a review of the album.

This is absolutely classic Pink Floyd; the opening track, One of these days, is still one of my all time Floyd favourites, couple this with the full 22 minutes of Echos (the old side 2) and this is a winner. The other tracks are just icing on the cake.

You may have guessed that this is biased review from someone who has enjoyed seeing them time after time from the original Dark Side of the Moon tour and has bought each of their 'main' albums.

Buy it, it is vital to your collection !
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of My Favourite Floyd Albums, 9 May 2014
By 
Mr. Peter Steward "petersteward" (Norwich, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Sometimes memories can deceive. Whilst people were singing the praises of Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here I always viewed Meddle as my favourite Floyd album. That was due as much to the sands of time as the music - in other words I remembered it from an era that held particularly happy memories for me. So how would it sit when I returned to it for the first time in many years?

The tone of the album is set by the opening track - one of those that starts so quietly you wonder whether there is something wrong with the computer or the stereo. Then it gives way to one of those rollicking instrumental passages that hurtle along, gathering pace as it goes and giving way to real rock riffs and occasional caveman like grunts. It all gives way to another piece of Dave Gilmour/Roger Water's whimsy in the quietly beautiful A Pillow of Winds - the kind of soothing music that became something of a signature for the band. Fearless is a rather throwaway song that for some strange reason ends with the Anfield football choir singing "You'll Never Walk Alone." San Tropaz sounds as if it could come from the Syd Barrett era and Seamus is a silly blues song complete with dogs howling.

Which just leaves us with Echoes - another magnum opus of 23 minutes plus. In true Floyd style it starts quietly and then builds with some lovely melodic vocals. Overall I would describe Meddle as a very low key harmonius album with a distinctive feeling of peace about it - some outstanding music, some more throwaway. Returning to it is like meeting an old friend, although over the years it may have lost some of its power it's still a fair achievement.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Finding their feet at last, 8 Mar 2011
This review is from: Meddle (Audio CD)
This is where Pink Floyd's run of classic 1970's albums really begins. Meddle is very much a game of two halves - side 1 comprises a set of shorter numbers, whilst Side 2 is taken up entirely by Echoes. Side 1 opens with One Of These Days, and dense and dramatic instrumental based around a thudding Roger Waters Binson-echoed bass riff. A showcase for all the band, and co-written by them all, this is a great curtain-raiser and was a staple of the band's live set for the next few years. The rest of Side 1 is a progression of mainly gentle and relatively undemanding guitar-led soft rock. The jazzy, Bacharach-style San Tropez is not eveyone's cup of tea, but I really like it. Side one ends with the two-minute blues joke of Seamus, a contender for the worst Floyd track ever - but it's mercifully brief.

What makes Meddle such a great album is the presence of the mighty and sprawling Echoes, many fans favourite Floyd track. Echoes was assembled from various fragments and jams, and was developed during concerts, originally entitled Nothing and evolving into Return of the Son Of Nothing before being rechristened Echoes for the album. Beginning with Rick Wright's organ imitating a sonar "ping", the song's stately development takes us through and extended intro into a relatively short (and lovely) verse-chorus section. This is followed by the frankly fantastic Funky Bit, an extended jam over massive bass, jabbing organ and wailing guitar. In live form this section was an absolute BELTER. The jam dissolves into wind effects over which Gilmour's bird-effect guitar screeches for a few minutes before the band very, very gradually rises out of the chaos for a reprise of the verse-chorus and a big instrumental crescendo. The last three minutes fade away gently and effortlessly into more wind noise. Ahhh....
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If only...., 20 Mar 2005
By 
This review is from: Meddle (Audio CD)
In 1971, Pink Floyd were still scrambling for an identity. Lost in the post-Barrett wilderness, all seemed lost...until Echoes. Initially titled Return Of The Son Of Nothing Parts 1-24 (among other things) it all started with that one sonar 'ping', unintentionally created by Rick Wright through a special speaker. Meandering across twenty three and a half perfectly orchestrated minutes, Echoes is quite possibly the song of Pink Floyd's career.
Most of the album isn't too shabby either. Fearless explores one of Roger Waters favourite lyrical themes - man vs. the corporate machine - across lightly strummed acoustic guitar and chanting football fans, while One Of These Days features a rare Nick Mason vocal performance and one of the Floyd's heaviest riffs.
Only Seamus brings the mood down; it is seemingly strategically placed just before Echoes on the running order, as if to trick the listener into thinking all is lost before revealing their true greatness.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Echoes of Pink Floyd's experimental psychadelic era, this is one of their best, 3 Oct 2010
By 
The Guardian (UK) - See all my reviews
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Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Meddle (Audio CD)
"Meddle" is one great album, and still sounds surprisingly fresh after almost 40 years.

For the younger listener who might still be discovering Pink Floyd's epic musical legacy, some of the albums which followed on from "Meddle", notably the 30-million seller "Dark Side of the Moon" from 1973 (which deservedly took the band from the interesting and experimental fringe into something close to a mainstream supergroup) might be a more accessible gateway. "Meddle" still carries the inheritance of the earlier, more psychedelic and experimental era but the band was starting to find its way to a more structured and disciplined sound, showcasing lyrics driven by the societal-alienation themes which dominated the "Roger Waters" era up to and beyond "The Wall."

"Meddle" divides naturally into different halves of equal length. The original Harvest-label vinyl LP had five tracks on side one:

1. The driving, powerful and essentially instrumental opener "One of these Days" with an insistent single-note bass motif introduced over the recorded sound of howling wind, gradually overlaid with raunchy guitar, held together by powerful high-register keyboard chords over a driving rhythm: a real rocker with a hard edge and a quirky but short distorted vocal phrase right in the middle: "One of these days, I'm gonna cut you up into little pieces" - scary psycho, or what?

2. The whimsical "Pillow of Winds" with Wright and Gilmour providing melodious complimentary vocals and calming down the mood

3. "Fearless", a slow but powerfully insistent song with a slightly syncopated rhythm whose lyrics express ideas of detached alienation later explored so much more fully in DSOTM (the crowd singing "You'll Never Walk Alone" on the soundtrack at the end of the song was the Liverpool Football Club "Kop")

4. The delightfully upbeat "San Tropez" with its summer beach-town feel, written and sung by Roger Waters

5. The peculiar and downbeat blues track "Seamus" which sounds like it might have been recorded when the band was drunk, complete with howling dog on the soundtrack

Then side two: "Echoes", arguably the greatest single track ever composed and recorded by the band. If you've not yet heard "Echoes" but have heard "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" then you have some idea of the long, slow, predominantly instrumental musical form full of richness and complexity of which the band is capable.

"Echoes" is a classic mood-piece, symphonic in concept and execution. With its theme of the sea, of the eternity of rolling waves and coral caves, it builds from a repeated single-note "ping" through a slowly-wake-up intro to a gradually more insistent and rhythmic main theme complete with harmonised vocal line; then moves through a thumping, rhythmic instrumental section into a long, spacey, stretched-out mid-section with eerie but simply beautiful electronically-generated whale-song sounds; rediscovers the main theme and builds melodically to a satisfying climax, and winds down with whale, sea-bird and ocean sounds to leave the listener spaced-out and simply awed. Put on the headphones, recline, crank up the volume and enjoy. You'll be won over. It's an all-time great, one of those rare instances where musical virtuosity, a simple but innovative idea, a kind of intuitive, psychic connection between musicians and the confidence to experiment with new sound techniques whilst remaining restrained and disciplined to form, all came together to distil something unique and wonderful. It's a great, unforgettable piece, a timeless treasure.

"Echoes" of course supplied the title of the 26-track retrospective compilation album, which features a slightly edited version of the eponymous piece sandwiched between "Another Brick" and "Hey You". However, the version here on "Meddle" is the full-length, unedited original.

If you can't work out what the weird image on the album cover is, it's a close-up of an ear. Nice idea.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a fantastic & diverse album, 26 Jan 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Meddle (Audio CD)
pink floyd seem to have that knack of moving effortlessly into different genres with each progressive album - and meddle is no exception. the feature tracks are without a doubt 'one of these days' and 'echoes' which are both brilliant tracks. 'echoes' gets my vote for greatest rock epic of all time. it takes up the whole b-side on the old vynil version and is very moody. 'pillow of winds' follows the tumult of 'one of these days' beatifully and soothingly. 'fearless' is like an anthem and very much a classic track. 'st tropez' and 'seamus' give the album a touch of blues and jazz. all in all one of pink floyds better efforts although the same could be said for every album up to 'the wall'
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just My Review....., 25 May 2001
This review is from: Meddle (Audio CD)
Atom Heart Mother, for all its glories, was an acquired taste, and Pink Floyd wisely decided to trim back its orchestral excesses for its follow-up, Meddle. Opening with a deliberately surging "One of These Days," Meddle spends most of its time with sonic textures and elongated compositions, most notably on its epic closer "Echoes." If there aren't pop songs in the classic sense (even on the level of the group's contributions to Ummagumma), there is a uniform tone, ranging from the pastoral "A Pillow of Winds" to "Fearless," with its insistent refrain hinting at latter-day Floyd. Pink Floyd were nothing if not masters of texture, and Meddle is one of their greatest excursions into little details, pointing the way to the measured brilliance of Dark Side of the Moon and the entire Roger Waters era. Here, David Gilmour exerts a slightly larger influence, at least based on lead vocals, but it's not all sweetness and light - even if its lilting rhythms are welcome, "San Tropez" feels out of place with the rest of Meddle. Still, the album is one of the Floyd's most consistent explorations of mood, especially from their time at Harvest, and it stands as the strongest record they released between Syd's departure and Dark Side.
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