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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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4.3 out of 5 stars
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on 28 April 2016
I enjoyed this book very much indeed.
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on 4 March 2016
Short, but very interesting. Thought provoking
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on 12 February 2016
GOOD BOOK, WOULD RECOMMEND
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on 28 December 2015
Great.
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on 20 November 2015
very interesting topic
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on 10 November 2015
This essay explains why we don't need to lie, and it's right. This should be compulsory reading in schools. Stop reading reviews and read the essay.
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on 4 October 2015
Dr Harris makes a poignant case for honesty that had an immediate effect on my own life, which I deployed immediately after reading this book with an impact on me and at least one other life. The situation is recounted below if you're interested. Before getting there, its worth noting that the recurring theme of Dr Harris' work - his use of confrontation to raise ethical questions in the mind of the reader - is neatly summarized in this work. Basically, societies can't function well on lies, and we are surrounded by dangerous forms of lying. These include aggressive District Attorneys prosecuting innocent people in order to advance their careers and journalists lying about their intentions for interviews, for example. The scenarios resulting from these lies, such as innocent people being sent to prison and, to extend the example, encountering situations such as joining a prison gang for survival, thereby leading to more lying, set back the social consciousness of the nation. Are we undermining ourselves by lying to kids about Christmas, loved ones about risky surgery, spouses about infidelity (even Harris is nuanced on this particular point) or the hypothetical murderer at the door searching for the victim hidden in your basement? In my case,a colleague who had been eager for a promotion, a promotion for which I knew she had not been short listed, had spent weeks making nice, appearing unannounced at meetings, asking intelligent-sounding questions and so forth in the hope and, perhaps, the expectation, that she would be next in line for this promotion which, as you may have guessed, is somewhat under my authority to bestow. It's not an authority I cherish, and my feeling in my heart of hearts was that this person just wasn't ready for the job. At the same time, it was not fair to tell this candidate she hadn't been short listed , as many other people were also applying for the job and would like to know the same thing. Nonetheless, the candidate's behavior had reached a point that was disempowering both to me and to her because it was forcing us into essentially artificial and disrespectful daily interactions that were based on ulterior motives and, frankly, mutual dislike of each other. So, I took her for coffee (she arrived late), explained the committee had not short listed her and why and reassured her of my commitment to her career (which is true of any colleague because everyone's career is sacrosanct). Our discussion led to a brief but honest interaction about our genuine motives and to a set of more concrete career directions for her, which were feasible and that I hadn't thought of before because I had been so focused on concealing the truth from her. This honest discussion strengthened our relationship, increased my respect for her and relieved me of the guilt and false sense of superiority under which I'd been suffering. I also came to appreciate where she was coming from in life, which helped overcome my previous distrust of her. So, you can see the book raised the consciousness of at least two people! In the the later edition that I downloaded through Kindle you can find rebuttals from readers that are answered , very adroitly, by Dr Harris and will settle doubts that may have arisen in the minds of readers of the original edition (for example, the practicalities associated with living in societies that are dominated by lying or in which revealing the truth would lead to one's execution or the curtailment of one's civil liberties.) Enjoy, and congratulations and thanks to Dr Harris!
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on 24 August 2015
Nice accessible text covering philosophical issues about lying rather than the usual stuff about how to spot a liar. Quite inspiring too
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on 3 August 2015
Having read the book I will try and be honest. For me lying may have happened and I did not necessarily see its implications. Good insightful read. Makes you answer questions in a different frame of light.
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on 3 August 2015
This book really made me think about all the small untruths we tell every day and what impact they have. It really did change my thinking. This is a book you should re-read and will because it's so short.
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