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32 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Anglo Saxon Britain
Good read. This book explains how the German tribes managed to subdue the Britons. It also explains the relationship between the Britons and the Romans after the Romans began to pull out their troops. And it also explains the relationship between the German tribes and Britons. A relationship which led the way to the eventual take over by the German tribes. It goes on to...
Published on 27 Jun 2012 by Arthur Tennant

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars the Anglo-Saxon invasion myth
The book presents a useful short summary of the Anglo-Saxon period of Britain. However developments in genetics, archaeology, linguistics and significantly the latest evidence from stable isotope analysis on human teeth, are gradually undermining the traditional historical view of the presumed Anglo-Saxon invasion post the 5th century AD Roman departure. Also plots of...
Published 12 months ago by FC Harris


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32 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Anglo Saxon Britain, 27 Jun 2012
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This review is from: Anglo-Saxon Britain (Kindle Edition)
Good read. This book explains how the German tribes managed to subdue the Britons. It also explains the relationship between the Britons and the Romans after the Romans began to pull out their troops. And it also explains the relationship between the German tribes and Britons. A relationship which led the way to the eventual take over by the German tribes. It goes on to chronicle the different Anglo Saxon Kings and their rivalaries (which can be a bit heavy)up until the Norman conquest. All in all a good read for anyone interested in that period of British History.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars the Anglo-Saxon invasion myth, 17 July 2013
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FC Harris (Willenhall, West Midlands United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Anglo-Saxon Britain (Kindle Edition)
The book presents a useful short summary of the Anglo-Saxon period of Britain. However developments in genetics, archaeology, linguistics and significantly the latest evidence from stable isotope analysis on human teeth, are gradually undermining the traditional historical view of the presumed Anglo-Saxon invasion post the 5th century AD Roman departure. Also plots of place-names related to Hill forts and Roman towns depicted on the 'fchknols' website (2013), similarly point to an Anglo-Saxon presence in Britain at least from the middle Iron Age, perhaps even earlier.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good but showing its age, 28 Jan 2013
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This review is from: Anglo-Saxon Britain (Kindle Edition)
I enjoyed this book immensely, but it is after 100 years showing its age, especially in the light of new DNA techniques, Also I hate the inconsistency of terms, i.e English, Saxon, Anglo Saxon, etc, or welsh, Briton, Celt, Cambrian, Romano Briton, to an untrained person this could be very confusing, but I have noticed that all these kind of history books are guilty of this.

SC Grant-Davies
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Many an old tune...., 8 April 2013
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Dr. Andrew R. Glover (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Anglo-Saxon Britain (Kindle Edition)
This book may be over a hundred and twenty years old but it is till so up-to-date that it surprises you as you read it; nearly a surprise on every page. Considering we are told and taught that the Saxons were a bunch of uncivilised barbarians who had little culture and were only civilised when the Normans defeated them then this book turns that idea fully on its head. School history lessons were wrong. This book enlightens you to their culture, art, literature and basic state of mind as a race of people that we are descended from, as well as their history and the important personnages and facts of dates. We should be proud of our roots not ashamed. I am surprised that this book has never been banned by the left or the do-gooders for telling the facts and the truth of our fantastic forefathers. A race we should be more than proud of descending from. It is full of useful and surprising facts and considering it was written without the knowledge we have since gleened from the "Sutton Hoo" ship burial and the "Staffordshire Hoard" then this is quite a book of knowledge. There are now plenty of books out there but most written from a politically correct stance due to political pressures. This book is above this pettiness. It should be on anyones shelf or Kindle if you are even the remotest bit interested in British History. Just download it, even better it is now free in a not too bad transcription on kindle.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Read, 16 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Anglo-Saxon Britain (Kindle Edition)
I never realised how much went on in this time period. I really enjoyed it and came out with a load of new knowledge.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars AS Britain, 13 Jan 2013
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This review is from: Anglo-Saxon Britain (Kindle Edition)
Provides a 19th century perspective onto current thinking in this era and therefore increase and stimulates debate. Worth spending some time with
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent summary of the subject, 25 Dec 2012
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This review is from: Anglo-Saxon Britain (Kindle Edition)
For someone like myself, with no previous knowledge of Anglo-Saxon Britain, this was a very readable and informative book. I found it to be a very good read and would recommend it to anyone wanting to get a good grounding ing t by e subject.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good book, 19 Feb 2013
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This book is very good i learnt a lot of information i previously didnt know, i took one star off because towards then end, i noticed the book repeating previous details.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Succinct, accurate, stimulating, informative, 24 Sep 2012
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This review is from: Anglo-Saxon Britain (Kindle Edition)
Anglo-Saxon Britain by Grant Allen is a book that now comes free via Amazon Kindle, so there is absolutely no excuse for not reading it, especially when such editions can be downloaded to and read from an ordinary personal computer, at zero cost and complete convenience. This is not an advertisement, except, of course, for the book.

Anglo-Saxon Britain ought to compulsory reading for all narrow-minded nationalists, Little Englanders, British national types, English leaguers and any other set of racial purity head-bangers, plus absolutely anyone who might even suggest that isolationism is either beneficial for or a natural state of the English. Anglo-Saxon Britain is not a new book, and hence does not cover any aspects of ethnology that have been developed since the arrival of DNA analysis. Anglo-Saxon Britain is thus an old-fashioned review and analysis of available historical documents and sources. But, in a succinct and wonderfully readable form, it succeeds in summarising the issue's complexity and communicating a beautifully rounded picture of a thoroughly complicated reality.

The English - and their Saxon and Jutish cousins - were, of course, invaders, originating in what we now call Germany, Denmark and Holland. What they brought to a Romanised, at least in part already Christian and largely unified land was barbarism, paganism and continual warfare. What they also brought with them - or at least the Angels did - was their language, a form of low German with gendered nouns that had case endings and verbs that declined into multiple forms But the general structure of that language endured, endured as its complexities of form gradually disappeared whilst its complexity of potential nuance grew. Its vocabulary welcomed successive waves of foreign invaders and its aesthetic adopted the more civilised ways of other foreigners from southern Europe.

The Danes also deserve a mention, of course, since they ruled most of what we now call England for much of the Anglo-Saxon period. And the Welsh and Celts, indigenous people, but only in a relative sense, were not only subjugated but contributed in their own way to the wholly complicated and, frankly mixed up, gene pool through inter-marriage. The point is made repeatedly that perhaps the most English - as far as the original form and sound of the language is concerned - is still spoken by the Lothians of modern-day Scotland, since the Angel settlers there were the least affected by subsequent waves of invasion.

What we do know about the English - very little, it has to be said, since they wrote down almost nothing about themselves - is that they rarely cooperated, except at the tribal or clan level, constantly bickered and argued, regularly fought one another and spent very little time on more civilised pursuits. At least some things have endured.

Anglo-Saxon Britain by Grant Allen does not trade any myths. It presents a learned, well researched and referenced account of the politics, the conflicts, the culture and language of the early English. It reminds us that the last English person to occupy the English throne was Harold in 1066 and he succumbed to an immigrant from continental Europe who moved in and made the place his own, perhaps improving it along the way. The book is superbly entertaining as well as informative, erudite and learned, but also lean, stimulating and succinct. Its sections on the language, alone, render it essential reading for anyone who is the least bit interested in English or the English.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Light on the Dark Ages, 19 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Anglo-Saxon Britain (Kindle Edition)
Brilliant stuff about the Dark Ages written so clearly. This is about times that never seemed to form part of history lessons at school. Hard to put down!
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