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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deluxe makes a great package - even if you have the original CD
I pre-ordered the Destroyed deluxe edition and it arrived the day after release:- It makes a great package, even if you have the original CD. It was a good idea for Amazon to add a bonus CD, shame that they can't be bothered to give it a proper listing description:- I am still wading through the contents but a summary is as follows:

Disc 1: Original CD -...
Published on 2 Nov. 2011 by Vilson

versus
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not awesome
As a big fan of Moby, I was looking forward to buying this album. I listened already four times the CD, and I can say that there are really beautiful tracks, but not all of them are. The album is good, but not awesome. It cannot be compared to Wait for Me, for instance. Also I can't say that all the tracks are suitable for empty cities at 2 A.M. I can't explain, but...
Published on 21 May 2011 by Andy B.


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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deluxe makes a great package - even if you have the original CD, 2 Nov. 2011
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I pre-ordered the Destroyed deluxe edition and it arrived the day after release:- It makes a great package, even if you have the original CD. It was a good idea for Amazon to add a bonus CD, shame that they can't be bothered to give it a proper listing description:- I am still wading through the contents but a summary is as follows:

Disc 1: Original CD - good/excellent 'ambient Moby' CD - we all know and love.

Disc 2: CD of extra material (55mins)
Good supplement, some of which has previously been released on Moby.com. Particular highlights are the extended/different versions of 'the broken places, lie down in darkness and the day'. [N.B. this disc is available on Spotify]

Disc 3: DVD of music videos, interviews and live performances
Another good supplement. The live performances worth seeing and add a new dimension to the tracks.
A bit disappointing that the bass sound wasn't as good as in the 'Wait for me' live DVD, but hey-ho.
Tracklisting:
Music videos for:
1. Be The One
2. Lie Down In Darkness
3. Sevastopol
4. The Day
5. Victoria Lucas
All available on moby.com
Saatchi & Saatchi Hello Future Video challenge: 10 videos (listed in Amazon description under Disc 4...)
Wilcox live sessions (Guitar and violin)
1. Porcelein
2. The Day
Main Square Festival performance from Arras, France in July 2011
1. Raining Again
3. Flower
4. Lie Down In Darkness
5. Honey
6. Disco Lies
Plus interviews with his imperial Mobyness.
I find that the DVD is a good way to chill-out before going to sleep!

Disc 4: Bonus 'Amazon-exclusive' CD recorded live at the Roundhouse, London in June 2011 (65 mins)
Worthwhile bonus with different live versions of key tracks. Reasonable sound - I was spoilt by the live sound on the 'Wait for Me' DVD.
Tracklisting - it is 'Disc 3' on the Amazon description...
1. Be the one
2. Sevastapool
3. In my heart
4. Go
5. The day
6. We are all made of stars
7. Flower
8. Porcelain
9. Lie down in darkness
10. Extreme ways
11. Lift me up
12. In this world
13. The right thing
14. Honey
P.S. Apparently the CD contains extracts from a 2CD issue to be made available sometime on Moby.com

All in all an excellent package and great value as well.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great value for money : Amazon has a bonus live CD with it!, 7 Nov. 2011
By 
Mr. M. A. Reed (Argleton, GB) - See all my reviews
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The Moby battleplan is becoming obvious. Release a bare bones album, and five months later, a superdeluxe edition with a live DVD, documentaries, loads of videos, and a a whole album of new music. Which makes me wonder why I should ever bother buying the first release, because five months later I buy it again. (In fact, I'm not buying the first release for any other purpose but to listen to the contents for a few months before the superduper version comes out).

"Destroyed" itself is yet another Moby record. A sort of sad, electronica Neil Young, Moby puts out a new record every two years or so, tours frequently, and now mines a fairly refined template : in the DVD that comes with this expanded version, the secret is out - these are often songs written and recorded in the middle of the night in hotel rooms across the world. "Destroyed" is another solid Moby album, much like the previous twelvty or so he has put out. A record with a handful of upbeat disco material, then moving to a more considered, reflective late night comedown. The template, and his sound, has barely moved in a decade since "Play".

With the death of the physical single as all but a fetish object has made this release the only way to obtain the extra songs we used to call b-sides. Here, on the second CD, are eleven songs from the thousands Moby has recorded over the years, mostly unheard - there's also a beautiful orchestral version of "The Day" (and alternate mixes of "Lie Down In Darkness", and "The Broken Places"). On the other hand, some of these new songs do outstay their welcome. "Washing" is at least two minutes too long, riding as it does on sparse instrumentation that becomes well, as boring as washing itself. It is, in effect an album in itself ; not a release made of the often ill-thought padding-for-the-sake-of-padding of dull and tedious remixes

The Amazon version of this package is the one to get : it contains an Amazon-only live recording on an audio CD shrinkwrapped to the package that contains an hour of live Moby recorded in at the iTunes Festival in London. The live material shows the individual recordings that make up the parent album in a new light, being the sound of living, breathing human beings jumping up and down and playing. The songs are the same, but livelier, brighter, and a refreshing change from the occasionally sterile studio versions in an effective greatest hits set. It rankles that the performance was only for competition winners, but that's part of the inherently elitest nature of it all. On the other hand, there's 14 live songs and over an hour of music, so it's no opportunistic flimsy bonus, but a worthy and enjoyable live release.

The DVD is a good value for money package : however the live material is frustratingly short - only 26 minutes recorded live in France. There's a short acoustic session, and the rest of the set is bolstered by videos / short films for half the album and alternate versions of other songs to around 17 or 18 videos. There's also a 20 minute interview, and behind the scenes footage. There's little weighty to wrap your teeth around, but there's plenty here to nibble on. The Interview meanwhile, is useful, showing the literary allusions that Moby has used for his song titles, and exploring a perhaps generally unseen depth to some of the material.

Overall, this is a worthwhile and value-for-money package. The DVD comes to around 3 hours in all, the album itself - and the second deluxe CD - add to around two hours of music, and the Amazon-only live set make that a further hour, so, for around £12, this is a great value binge of new Moby music. Let your ears invest in this.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A soundtrack for life, 5 Aug. 2011
By 
J. Potter "johniebg" (Berkshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Destroyed (Audio CD)
Music for me should accompany life and not narrate it. Which is why Moby seems to have created a soundtrack to my life, never more so than his latest album: Destroyed. In his own words: 'I often have insomnia and spend a lot of times awake in hotel rooms at 2 a.m when everyone else in the world seems to be asleep.'

Which is why this album works so well, because it really does sound like laying awake in the middle of the night and feeling dislocated from reality. I don't have the words to technically describe the music, only how it makes me feel. And like so many of Moby's albums it plugs directly into the very essence of who I am. I cannot imagine anyone with any sense of soul would not simply love this.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mellow Moby, 27 Nov. 2011
By 
The usual suspect (2nd aisle on the right, top shelf) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Destroyed (Audio CD)
Depending on which Moby you like will determine whether Destroyed is for you or not. If you like say, Hotel there's a good possibility Destroyed may not sit too well with you. If you like Wait for me, it most definitely is.

For me, Destroyed actually turned out to be the album that I have listened to most over the last 12 months and I still am. Perfect wind down music.

If you want a reason to buy Destroyed it's simple - Lacrimae. Like only Moby can, he's taken a very simple few notes on keyboard, continually hit them and turned them into one amazing tune that takes you to all sorts of places for 8 minutes. Very possibly Moby's finest tune for me.
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38 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What if Kraftwerk, Pink Floyd and Moby walked into an airport bar at 2am? This would be the result..., 19 May 2011
By 
John J. Martinez (Chicago, Illinois, United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Destroyed (Audio CD)
After a now-complete listen of Moby's tenth album, I think I've got the gist of who or what is he channeling - he is channeling himself in his rawest and most experimental form yet, and this release is going to be one of his more bolder choices. A great many fans might not get his even more odder path, direction, whatever - but many should also understand the familiar sense of message to it, as many Moby fans who do understand where he's going and simply don't mind the ride. If I was tired and alone and my mind was racing and I just couldn't sleep, this would be the kind of music I would create. It's wide open, out there, impersonal, and so generic it makes sense in a 2AM kinda way. Then again, I also like the repetitive droning sound of those tire-ridgey things that warn you to slow down on the highway too.

These songs were created due to two very large factors: Moby has had a chronic case of off and on insomnia for years, and he has always made music to push the boundaries of what is definable as music. On these merits, Moby has both succeeded and failed. Yes, it's an ambitious project, but it hurts my brain because I get normal REM sleep and following his path down the semiconscious hallways of his mind's eye will hurt you if you're not ready for it.

15 songs adding up to just under an hour:

1. The Broken Places - right off the bat you are slowed down to a snail's pace, but just quick enough for you to see the blurs of the lines on the road, and to notice the harshness of the neon lights against the blackest of night from your hotel room. It's creeps up on you quietly, and with all the odd intention of someone trying to show you the world still is alive and breathing after the 3am hour, but just in another subtle way.

2. Be The One - Sometimes that voice that hums in the back of your head just won't quit, and like a guilty loop going round and round that no one else can hear you still have to operate and keep moving through the night, even though you look crazy doing it. The next time you're out at 4:30 AM, look at that one guy or gal who has something going on in their head - it's obvious and you'll see Moby's not alone here.

3. Sevastopol - is a wonderful coastal town off the Crimean penninsula of the Ukraine and is a strategically important naval point for the Russian navy. It is a focal point for the western coast of Central Europe and the Black Sea in general. It's HEV rail system breezes by farms one moment and nightclubs the next. This song is this city. It's as urban as it gets electronically and if you listen closely you can feel the city's heartbeat go right through you.

4. The Low Hum - Remember those tire-thingys? They live in this song, and the guest vocals by Inyang Bassey (I think) float above and through the song in a hazy smoky torrent, as the beat kicks on, then off, then back on again. You can feel the hum in your seat if you try...

5. Rockets - Inyang Bassey (for sure) helped out on this odd song about what I can only describe it as the semiconscious trying to recall something and losing. It's like Thomas Dolby and Pink Floyd decided to dance though Moby's head and popped out as the oddness of the disjointed music takes off.

6. The Day - I don't like when the sun is coming up as I try to go to sleep if I've had an allnighter - there's something obtrusive about, yet it's necessary. This song is all about the rest of the world rising up to the challenge of another day and a few others going to bed. When I played this for the very first time I immediately recalled John Lennon's song "#9 Dream," a strangely remote yet distant slow pulse of a song so similar and close in theme. I thought, was Moby channeling Lennon, or was Lennon channeling Moby to create this similar sing-song? Either way, it's one of my favorite tracks on the album.

7. The Right Thing - Pink Floyd meets 1990s electronica, plain and simple. Are there mother issues spread out throughout the track ala Roger Waters? Definitely. Can Moby make you feel those things without going too far? Well, what is too far?

8. Victoria Lucas - at one time or another, whether we want to admit it or not, we all wear masks. Victoria Lucas was writer Sylvia Plath's pseudonym whenever she went out on the road and simply didn't want to be recognized. This track goes very near Fatboy Slim territory, but I believe this will be the most successful one, as it's wonderful and the beats and the drama are kept to a literal minimum and you can just throw it on and dance to it. That, in my mind, is where Moby has always wanted to do - at heart he's just a DJ wanting to make the world get up and move to his beat. Second best track on the album.

9. After - the sheer repetition of recorded messages, whether they're the same directions tacked on in a motel room, on billboards, in airports or even in vehicles (seat belts required) have an after affect very people recognize. We are being conditioned to notice it, but not ignore it, to the point that the mind gets numb to the message and just accepts it. This song sounds like that.

10. Blue Moon - Some nights, if you ever look up at the moon, you'll get a momentary sense of reality as the moon itself feels like it's right on top of you and there it is - you're all alone, but out there there's crowds of people doing their jobs quietly on the third shift. If you've ever had one of those late night jobs, you understand. You have to get moving as the rest of the world takes a break. You're not alone, but you are. One of the better more subtle dance tracks.

11. Lie Down In Darkness - You've had those nights, you just can't sleep and your brain just won't shut off. You can feel the shift in your head as you just close your eyes and just want to sleep but the thoughts just keep on leaping over and over in your head. Some people think this may be poor eating habits, or maybe it's unfiltered guilt. I think Moby sometimes can't sleep, and these were the thoughts bouncing around one night and this is the result of it. Like you haven't done it either.

12. Stella Maris - there's about three different meanings I tapped into here - the term 'stella maris' refers to a title of the Virgin Mary, also known as Our Lady, Star of the Sea. There's a hymn written about her titled 'Ave Maris Stella' which is over 1,000 years old easy. Or maybe he was reaching into the loneliness of the title character in a 1918 silent movie by the same name, in which during a key scene a phrase written on a door jumps out at you - "all unhappiness and world wisdom leave outside - those without smiles need not enter." Has Moby finally figured out a way to vocally acknowledge God given his heavily Catholic upbringing and searching themes, or has he noticed being alone in a room at 4am the rest of the world still goes on without him, essentially locking him away from it, and he's blissfully happy about that? This track is his expression of that moment he finally was able to reach into, and it has a certain majesty to it.

13. The Violent Bear It Away - crime is not just an act, but a choice and an action with horrible reactions. There was a wildly violent and almost heretical book by the same name written by female author Flannery O'Connor which could be referenced here, but once again Moby's odd catholic thinking is fully coming to bear - a quote from the Catholic bible it says "From the days of John the Baptist until now, the kingdom of heaven suffereth violence, and the violent bear it away." Look up both the biblical quote and read a few sections of her book, and you'll get what's going on here.

14. Lacrimae - a latin phrase meaning 'tears.' If you had ever seen quiet utter desolation feeling designed to go on forever, like a car junkyard in New York City or a set of oil wells burning in Iraq for hours at a time, you'd feel in awe of the countless thousands of moments it took for those two to be where they are and how they got to be there. Then you might shed a tear for those things, because tragedy isn't just reserved to us a collective people destroying the rain forest or using plastic instead of reusable sacks to carry our food. We're observing what might be the end of the world right in front of us, just a moment at a time, and we don't even know it. At just over 8 minutes, one of the most thought-provoking tracks on the album. Throw this song on the next time you see a bunch of junk just laying there in the world, and as people walk by, no one cleans it up.

15. When You Are Old - Moby's coda to himself. There isn't much to say as it's atmospheric but the title explains it all. He's not done, but he's been recording and performing music for over 20 years now, he has spread his message of veganism, his work with the Humane Society, supporting Tibet with one hand and reminding others that playing Dungeons and Dragons isn't so bad with the other. But man, what a pain it is getting old. Every modern singer has moaned the fact moving on is hard to do, but turning the page only begins a new chapter. He leaves us on that note, to go to yet another airport, to fly out on the red eye flight, to pen some more music, and we stand back and let him create the way he has felt he can create the best way he knows how.

In the end, I give this album 5 stars. I wanted to give it 4, but I have to explain.

After all the gesturing and musical journeying, I was left out of sorts. Moby left us (at least me) with this one nagging thought - what am I leaving behind that someone can pick up and enjoy? I, for one, can't think of something significant I've done that will define me as a person, and maybe that's the challenge of this album. I felt blah afterwards, as this album is not for day listening - it's ambient sounds for a sleepy city's creaks and moans, and as you alone travel through it play this and see where Moby has been trying to get some rest and resolution for most of his adult life.

For me, I was thrown off about the sound as well, unevenly cold and impersonal as they were, but now I get what he was trying to do - he's trying to show the rest of the world his truly human side, the side that worries and doesn't sleep and as his fears, neuroses - that we all have - kept him awake, he noticed some things that if you weren't there at that moment in the middle of the night, you never would have thought about it, or maybe even cared about it.

A book by Moby is also being released as a companion to the music. I have also seen this done already, from the book version of stills from the French film "La Jetee" to the 1991 film "Until the End Of the World," complete with mood music by artists including U2 and Depeche Mode. Let's also not also forget the ambitious yet clearly not-too-sane "Metal Machine Music" by Lou Reed. As all of this kind of sub-genre of music has been done - moody introspective music by an artist - I almost took away that 5th star, but he's earnest in supporting this album.

If you can't sleep, turn this on and look around you. You might be able to sleep halfway through it, and that's wonderful, but also kinda sad.

(thanks for reading, don't forget to leave a vote - also, don't forget to leave a comment, as I read every one.)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Destroyed deluxe version: a very fine offering, 6 May 2013
By 
The Guardian (UK) - See all my reviews
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This 4-disc `deluxe' collection of Moby's 2011 release `Destroyed' is in essence a 2-CD album plus a DVD, and a bonus CD recording of a live-on-stage concert in London featuring some of Moby's classic numbers from his earlier work.

The 2 studio-recorded CDs offer a mellow collection of music from Moby, more in the overall style of 2009's `Wait for Me' than `Hotel' or `Last Night' though with some upbeat numbers. The music is complex, and develops course by course rather than serving you the whole meal in one go. You could almost describe the style as `progressive' in that several numbers evolve from sparse beginnings to increasing multi-layered complexity and in most cases take the listener on an emotional roller-coaster to a satisfying climax.

Disc 2 continues in the style of disc 1, with 8 new tracks plus variants on 3 of the disc 1 tracks: `the broken places', `lie down in darkness' and `the day', the theme of which is the day Moby lost his mother to cancer.

The DVD includes videos, live-on-stage material, interviews and some odds & sods. There appears to be no `play all' option, so you have to watch the clips one-at-a-time then return to the main menu to make your next selection.

The bonus disc sold only with the `deluxe' edition is a live-on-stage concert recorded in London in June 2011. This is Moby at his most energetic onstage with mojo in high gear. Danceable renditions of 14 numbers including `in my heart', `we are all made of stars' `porcelain' and `lift me up' actually better the originally released studio versions.

The presentation is fine but understated. In a strong hinged box oozing quality, the 4 discs nest in robust numbered sleeves, and a glossy 12-page booklet full or artistic photo-images completes the package. The whole effect is very tasteful, even highbrow.

So, with the deluxe edition of `Destroyed' you get a lot of very fine music for your money.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Moby hit...in my opinion., 23 Jan. 2012
This review is from: Destroyed (Audio CD)
Personally, I really enjoyed this- but let us put this into context- I thought "wait for me" was an incredible piece of work- and I feel that "destroyed" is not a million miles away, certainly a continuation of "the story" if you like. No, not another "Play" or "Hotel" - but I really enjoy it.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wiser, Older - astrong, thoughtful record, 16 May 2011
By 
Mr. M. A. Reed (Argleton, GB) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Destroyed (Audio CD)
Less than two years after "Wait For Me", Moby returns, in another quiet storm, with another somewhat understated album of gentle melancholy. The past half-decade has been a strange place for Moby : the all-conquering "Play" of a decade ago is forgotten, the endless touring that ground to a halt in late 2005 replaced by a lower profile of occasional shows and prolific record releases. With the collapse of his record company, 2008's discoified "Last Night" largely fell off the face of the planet quietly after selling a respectable 700,000, and "Wait For Me" again sold a respectable 500,000. Then again, these are good sales and one you can make a good but not amazing living at.

If anything, "Destroyed" is designed for the sense of advancing age : the hangover, the quiet train journey to work : built on slowly ascending / descending string lines, sparse, but not simple rhythms, and minimal, repetitive lyrics that create spacious worlds - much like Pink Floyd - where the mind can wander and explore inner space at its own pace. The guest vocalists make the album a somewhat anonymous experience - but share a common language, a common rhythm - and it is a record that, unlike some, takes a few listens, the right mood, the right circumstances to click into place. "Be The One", the original free download and lead track is a pacier, faster song than the rest of the album, whilst "Sebastopol" and "The Day", add a more gentle, and considered, fragility. If anything, the album cover reflects the contents perfectly - a sterile environment, a quiet calm, a sense of gradual decay - that makes "Destroyed" his best record in six years. In many ways, "Destroyed" is an amalgam of his work of the past decade, tempering speedy disco with anthemic melancholy, and, as the album reaches its long end, a careful, epic, unfurling electronic vista that stretches near to infinity, as it ebbs, flows, rises and falls and finally, slowoly fades from view somewhat meditatively. It's a dignified ending.

Again, "destroyed" isnt the best album Moby's ever made, nor is it a radical reinvention of the Moby sound, but a strong consistent album of melodic melancholia that becomes ever more valuable with repeat listens.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars moby, 17 Oct. 2011
This review is from: Destroyed (Audio CD)
I have to say this album is excellent. Moby is back to form. It has not left my hi fi since i have bought. Would advise other moby fans to buy it...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Stunning, 28 Mar. 2012
This review is from: Destroyed (Audio CD)
Picked this up recently and it is easily in my top 5 albums of all time.

Some songs are just downright beautiful.

A true gem.
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