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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Readers-on-a-Dragon are swept away in body and spirit
I must say I revelled in the beginning of this story the very first time I read it, carrying on as it does from the excruciating cliff-hanger that brought `Royal Assassin' to a stunningly climactic close. It's a measured, thoughtful and yet utterly engrossing entrance into the final chapter of the Farseer trilogy and sets the tone very well indeed for all that's to come...
Published on 19 Dec. 2007 by Fantasy Lore

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What happened to this trilogy!!!
Was this actually written by the same person as the first two books? The first two were fantastic and I really enjoyed them. This book seemed to go on and on with very little of substance actually happening and leads up to one of the most unsatisying endings I have encountered. I think the author lost the plot, quite literally.
Published on 15 April 2012 by Bungo


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Readers-on-a-Dragon are swept away in body and spirit, 19 Dec. 2007
I must say I revelled in the beginning of this story the very first time I read it, carrying on as it does from the excruciating cliff-hanger that brought `Royal Assassin' to a stunningly climactic close. It's a measured, thoughtful and yet utterly engrossing entrance into the final chapter of the Farseer trilogy and sets the tone very well indeed for all that's to come in this revelatory, far-removed and yet exhilarating concluding story.

The first time I read this book I was so excited to learn how the events in the lives of FitzChivalry, the Fool, Verity and Kettricken would conclude that I realise now (having just read it for the second time) that I overlooked some lulls in the story, and there are some lulls in the middle particularly, albeit brief and still in the traditional, maddeningly-addictive Hobb style. These lulls are however necessary, for Fitz needs to come to terms with his own demons, delusions and short-falls before he can confront the powerful forces in Wit, Skill, brute force and cunning that will thwart him in the final series of battles at the end of this story. Therefore `Assassin's Quest' holds a special place in my heart, as the story that takes Fitz beyond the confining and defining walls of Buckeep, into the world and finally sees him become a part of it, aware of his failings, but accepting of his role as Catalyst, despite all the sacrifices from him it demands.

In retrospect (and since Hobb has published the Tawny Man trilogy, which continues on the events in the lives of these characters) it's easy to read this book and have the certain feeling that much is left undone and unfinished in `Assassin's Quest' for Fitz and his followers. Or perhaps that's simply due to Hobb's expert story-telling ability in how she was able to gather all the many minute loose threads of this tale and weave them together into another trilogy of books so credible, vibrant and worthy of being told as the tales in the Tawny Man trilogy. But I must admit `Assassin's Quest' still feels to me to be an incomplete tale, or rather only a stepping stone leading to an even greater tale of keen human insight and heart-wrenching adventures. Luckily for us all this immensely satisfying and yet bittersweet example of story-telling is continued in `Fool's Errand', which you might be able to guess is precisely the book I am currently re-reading as you finish this review...
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What happened to this trilogy!!!, 15 April 2012
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Was this actually written by the same person as the first two books? The first two were fantastic and I really enjoyed them. This book seemed to go on and on with very little of substance actually happening and leads up to one of the most unsatisying endings I have encountered. I think the author lost the plot, quite literally.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the conclusion to an excellent trilogy, 17 Aug. 2004
By 
Joe Sherry (Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
"Assassin's Quest" is the third and final book of Robin Hobb's Farseer Trilogy. When this series began, we met a young boy without a name. This boy was taken in by the royal house of Buck. See, this boy was the illegitimate child of one of the princes. He was given the name FitzChivalry and was trained as an assassin for the king. Through treachery, the king was slain and the prince that has Fitz's loyalty, Verity, was away on a quest to find they mythical Elderlings to enlist their help against the Red Ship Raiders that have been terrorizing the kingdom. With Verity gone and King Shrewd now dead, Prince Regal is free to act against, Fitz, whom he has always hated. At the end of book 2, "Royal Assassin", Fitz was presumed dead by Regal and buried. But like it is said in "The Princess Bride", Fitz was only mostly dead (he took a poison that would simulate death, much like Juliet did in "Romeo and Juliet"). The story picks up several months later and Fitz is in the care of Burrich, the man who has raised him all these years. Fitz acts like an animal, for that is what he believes he truly is (for the poison to work, Fitz had to use the "Wit" magic that has bonded him with a wolf). Burrich is working to restore Fitz's mind and reflexes to that of a human.
Fitz has to recover, or else there will not be much of a story. When he does, he decides to seek his revenge on Regal and Regal's coterie of Skill users who helped to kill Shrewd and sabotage Buck against the Red Ship Raiders. The title of "Assassin's Quest" is especially apt for this book. Fitz is the titled Assassin, and this novel truly has a quest feel to it, especially as the story progresses. Every since Verity first started out to find the Elderlings, I have wondered what will become of this quest, and Fitz also seeks to answer this question as well.
The Farseer Trilogy is excellent fantasy. Being told in the first person point of view, it is a change from the typical fantasy novel, and Hobb does not hold anything back. We know what Fitz can know, so this cannot be a broad sweeping saga. And yet, this series is not lacking for any depth of storytelling. Hobb also does not protect her protagonist any. Horrible, horrible things happen to Fitz throughout the series and that is a part of the raw power here. The series may be slower moving at times, but that is not for any lack of quality writing on Hobb's part. Quite the opposite. The story moves slowly by necessity, but it never fails to be interesting. "Assassin's Quest" only serves to make me want more Hobb, and to move on to the "Liveship Traders" and then onto "The Tawny Man" series.
-Joe Sherry
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A thoroughly dismal and long-winded final volume., 16 Mar. 2014
By 
Willy Eckerslike (France) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
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This third and thankfully final instalment should be subtitled "Fitz the Petulant wanders aimlessly, carelessly doing what he should not". I considered the second volume to be somewhat bloated so I should really have been prepared but I dived in regardless.

This is a huge book so relentlessly stuffed with padding that just getting through a chapter takes a gargantuan effort and, as with `Royal Assassin', I found myself skip-reading any paragraphs without dialogue. The eponymous quest sees Fitz alienate the only people who care about him as he mopes off with a vague notion of doing one thing, realising just too late that it's stupid then wandering off elsewhere to see what damage he can do there. That more-or-less summarises the linear, purposeless narrative of first six hundred pages or so. The last quarter of the volume meanders towards an utterly predictable conclusion which is executed in such a rushed, off-hand manner that it appears that the author was as bored as the rest of us and just wanted to get it over with.

Gone is the intricate plotting, pace and inventiveness of the first volume to be replaced with a truly pedestrian and, frankly dull, slog. It would appear that despite early promise, Robin Hobb has thrown herself willingly into the epic fantasy quagmire, joining the likes of Robert Jordan and Stephen Erikson. If you're a fan of the genre then you'll probably enjoy the Hobb's Farseer Trilogy but please, please can somebody come up with a tale to rival to Eddings' superb Belgariad? - That's how to write Fantasy.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An exceptionally weak book, 30 Jun. 2013
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This review is from: Assassin's Quest (The Farseer Trilogy, Book 3) (Kindle Edition)
Let's get straight to the heart of the matter. This book is boring, and the ending is pathetically weak.

The book is interminable. Endless pages of the characters trudging along. Nothing happens, apart from endless soul searching. All of the characters are suffering from acute depression, as you will if you read this. In general, the characters morph from being colourful and well drawn in the first book (and the second, to a certain extent), to being monochromatic and weak.

And then the ending.

After hundreds of pages of monotony, there is a ten (and I kid you not), ten page ending that tries to cover off everything from forging to the red ship raiders to the mysterious white ships and the entire fate of the Six Duchies. And in summary it reads "And they all lived happily ever after".

It is atrocious.

I can only assume that Hobb bored herself so senseless that she decided to just kill the book dead. The only problem is that she still published it.

A massive disappointment to what could have been a brilliant trilogy, if only Hobb hadn't taken such a wrong turning on the Skill Road.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A sense of loss prevailed when I finished this book., 10 Mar. 2002
By 
I started Assasins Quest immediatly I had finished Royal Assasin. Odd that a book can give you a strange feeling of excited nervousness whilst you are starting to become entwined with its world, but that is exactly the feeling I got with this book, made possible by Hobb's powerful explanations and descriptions of the Six Duchies throughout the first two books.
The storyline - one difficult to make feasable - was as expertly carved and detailed as Verity's Dragon. A special quality was the emotive response associated with each of the lead characters, these have been building up from the begining of the trilogy and finally climax in the middle of the Quest.
Something equally rare in any type of book is the sense of loss experienced with the completion of the Trilogy. It is impossible for me to adequtely describe in words but for a good few days after finishing Assasins Quest, there was something not quite complete about me, an emptiness only quenched by fact that the story continues in Fool's Errand, offering the chance for another immersion into Hobb's special world and the possiblity of escaping reality for a while longer.
If you were not sure to continue your journey into the Duchies after the close of the second book, be assured that the conclusion is surly some of the most exciting fantasy writing I have ever had the fortune to read.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hobb's quest falls short at the end!, 13 Aug. 2010
By 
N D Lambert (Oxford, Oxon United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Like many other reviewers here, I had high expectations for this book. I practically devoured the first two novels because the characters and situations were so compelling, and a step beyond most fantasy series. Following Fitz's death and resurrection at the end of Book 2, I felt certain that Robin Hobb would serve up some remarkable twists during Assassin's Quest.

Sadly the ending of this book falls far short of the high standard Hobb set herself previously. Having strenuously avoided fantasy cliches she suddenly rushes them out in the final third of the text, including dragons, a cartoonish villain, odd plot jumps and, to cap it all, a ludicrous happy ending! I'm not saying the book should not have a positive finish (and God knows, Fitz deserves a break) but the speedy tying up of so many plot elements in less than 10 pages really spoils the story.

The book's main problem is its uneven pacing. The rush at the end contrasts with the interminable walk along the Skill Road to find the Elderlings. In fact the entire episode in the Mountain Kingdom lasts far too long and becomes terribly repetitious. Along with this, Fitz's battle with Regal and his coterie is strung out too. This means we never get back to Buckkeep and the book's main conflict with the Red-Ship Raiders until they are briefly revisited at the end. I can't believe this suddenly becomes peripheral to the story but it does - and the whole business of Forging is flippantly explained in a paragraph.

I literally cannot understand why such a competent writer as Hobb, who weaves a complex and powerful story, suddenly loses sight of the most interesting ideas. The faceless Red-ship Raiders and the mysterious White Ship are surely ripe for more encounters and battles, so they could be unmasked at last. They are the true villains of the trilogy whilst Prince Regal, for all his destructive scheming, does not make a convincing major enemy. But the whole business of the Elderlings and their eventual reawakening is an awkward deus-ex-machina that saves Hobb from having to write a convincing ending. Ah well...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not quite up to the level of the first two books, 16 Mar. 2011
By 
Jim J-R (West Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
The third book in Robin Hobb's Farseer trilogy is, while still an excellent read, a little bit of a let down after the brilliance of its two predecessors. Fitz must recover from the events at the end of 'Royal Assassin' and set out to kill his evil uncle and restore his good uncle to the throne, while saving the kingdom from its enemies.

The book starts well, continuing the style of the earlier books as Fitz recovers, but then from about a third of the way in it descends into a typical fantasy quest, which seems to drag on forever. The chapters at this point seemed to stretch out longer and longer and I lost part of my motivation to keep reading.

Similarly, the end, once it arrives, seems squashed into such a small page count that by the time it arrived I had given up on this novel actually concluding the storyline. Much is kept from the reader, and indeed the characters, at this point that things become confusing, and at least in one place it seems the author deliberately misleads the audience, which I found slightly annoying.

Overall, this book is much more about the relationships between the characters than before. Not only Fitz's with the others but between them as well, and this is what supports the book through the quest and deliberate withholdal of information.

The ending does not live up to some of the hype it is given through the novel though, and so I feel I shall have to read on through the trilogies that serve as sequels to this one, despite a little trepidation.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Conclusion That Surpasses Previous Books, 31 July 1999
By A Customer
I am surprised by earlier reviews (see US site) that found "Assassin's Quest" lacking in comparison to the first 2 books in the "Farseer Trilogy." My response was just the opposite, doing much to redeem the weaknesses of those earlier novels. Though very well written and keeping my interest, "Assassin's Quest" far surpasses both, adding even greater emotional depth to the strength of Hobb's characterizations, as well as finally realizing the potential of magical lore only haphazardly explored in the earlier work. Further, the storyline is much more focused and unified, without the prior tendancy to amble along the standard sword and sworcery path commonplace for this genre. Hobb finally impresses her own unique vision upon her magical world, and in a way which is masterful, not only in terms of characterization and vivid detail - from the beginning her forte - but in telling the tale as well. Finally, the work ends on a note unexpected and bittersweet, and is all the more thought provoking and pleasurable for it. Bravo!
By itself, this book stands apart as a unique and wonderful achievement in fantasy fiction, and as a conclusion to the "Farseer Trilogy" does much to lift the earlier books up to its level. An enthusiastic 5 stars for this volume alone, and 4 stars for the trilogy overall. And I urge you to read her "Ship of Magic," which looks to be the start of an even stronger series, and an equally marvellous as well as intelligent read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars just as great as the first two, 20 April 2000
By A Customer
I loved this book just as much as I loved the first two. I thought the last book in this amazing trilogy continued to prove Robin Hobb's unique talent. She has the ability to make one care immensly about her characters to the extent where you laugh and cry along with them. At the same time she crafts a complex and interesting plot that is never boring. I highly recommend this series to anyone who can apprecite wonderful writing and, quite simply, just an altogether great book.
And it looks like we will be hearing more from Fitz in the future. Robin Hobb is currently writing the first book in a trilogy that will continue with Fitz's life in his point of view. Exciting!
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