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73
4.8 out of 5 stars
Different Class (and Insert) [VINYL]
Format: VinylChange
Price:£22.82+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
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42 of 43 people found the following review helpful
on 21 January 2004
For those not gullible or stupid enough to buy into the whole media-led Battle of Blur/Oasis nonsense of 1995/96, there were other bands to listen to. This was my first year at university, and it seemed that every corridor in every Hall of Residence resonated to the sound of either (What's The Story) Morning Glory or Different Class. As great and enjoyable as the former was, despite being proclaimed by many as a genius, at the end of the day Noel Gallagher's lyrics were incoherent gibberish. If you're a lyrics person who likes to get lost in the vivid world to which the words and music take you, then Pulp were the obvious popular alternative.
And it really couldn't get more vivid than the world to which Jarvis Cocker took us. Cynical and disillusioned, squalid and depraved, funny and sad, joyful and desperate ' if you could step inside the album you would most likely find yourself leaning against a urine-soaked wall on a rainy street corner on a run-down Sheffield housing estate, watching its impoverished inhabitants eke out their dead-end existence with no hope or escape, only drink, drugs, seedy casual sex and mindless violence providing any distraction from the bleakness of it all.
Depressing as this vision is, Different Class is by no means a depressing listen. Whilst it has its moments of desperate, lonely sadness (Live Bed Show), pathetic, forlorn longing (Disco 2000, Underwear) and sordid depravity (Pencil Skirt, I Spy), there are also uplifting moments of defiance and righteous anger, all of which is wonderfully underscored by Cocker's spiky wit. Opening track Mis-Shapes is a rallying cry for anyone who has ever been made to suffer for standing out from the herd, whilst Common People ' the classic for which Pulp will always be remembered ' rages magnificently against those who attempt to be fashionably working class. There is tenderness too ' Something Changed is simply lovely.
Pulp had already been around for a long time before Different Class was released, and this album represents them at the absolute pinnacle of their game. The perfect album for its time, it rose above the frenzied hype and media manipulation that surrounded the Britpop era, and perhaps serves as the most powerful and articulate example of the music produced during this period. It speaks to the secret dark side in all of us of which we are uncomfortably aware but would prefer not to acknowledge, especially to other people. Cocker is forthright and unabashed in sharing his with us to superb (if occasionally unsettling) effect.
I can get as misty-eyed as everyone else of my generation at the sound of Wonderwall or Don't Look Back In Anger ' after all, they were hits at the same time, I like them very much and they provoke very fond memories of my student days. But ultimately they are meaningless and have nothing to say. There's nothing at all wrong with that, of course. But to hear a song that takes you on a vivid lyrical journey to a very unpleasant place in all its stark, dank, grimy squalor and thoroughly enjoy the ride as well as appreciate the message is an all too rare experience. Different Class achieves this with practically every track. As an album, it is a must-have for anyone's collection. As a document of the 'Cool Britannia' period (which, again, was purely a media creation in the first place) it is invaluable ' proof that not all British rock stars of that time were drunken loutish neanderthals. And as a reminder of my first year at university' utterly indispensible.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 21 January 2007
I hadn't listened to this album in about 8 years and revisited it recently. I couldn't believe I had left it so long - almost every track is truly brilliant, from tales of drugged-out nights in a field, the inevitable come-downs, being 'common'!Marvellous.

Every song on this disc is totally memorable (bringing back wild and happy memories from the summer I turned 18). It seems to have everything from mildly comedic ramblings in Sorted for E's and Whizz, true sentiment in Something Changed to the faintly sinister I Spy. All delivered in Cocker's instantly recognisable broad Sheffield accent (Eat your heart out, Arctic Monkeys).

This album definitely has to be one of the finest to come out of the nineties. Nuff Said!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 15 July 2005
Finding this CD recently tucked away at the back of my cupboard is a crime I probably deserve suitable punishment for, but after dusting it off and slamming it in the CD player it's been nearly played to death over the past month or so.
12 pumping tracks, each with their own relevance and meaning, whether it's the angry rallying cry of being different in the stomping opening of "mis-fits" or the sex fuelled desire of the next track "pencil skirt". Jarvis Cocker's subject matter ranges from the everyday lives of the back street working classes to the mind numbing ignorance of the rave scene.
The two "hits" from the album "Disco 2000" and "Common People" shouldn't be overlooked as easy "made for radio" singles either. The fierce fury in the tone of "Common People" is plain for all to see; railing against the meaningless lives played out by the working class it is still an awfully powerful song and no less relevant today as it was back in the mid-90's.
Several other reviewers here have recalled the music scene at the time of the release of this album, and the media led band war between Oasis and Blur. What could be said is that this album has stood the test of time far better than the more throw away pop of Blur or the macho posturing of Oasis and still come out with a great level of pertinence and integrity. Anyone looking to expand their record collections with some memories of the Britpop era could do no better than to start with this gem of an album.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 7 September 2005
I bought this album when it originally came out but dug it out recently after seeing Pulp's barnstorming performance in the 90's at glastonbury. This CD is simply sublime, I just can't believe that I haven't listened to it much over the last few years.
The most incredible thing about this CD is how fresh it sounds today. Standout tracks for me are misfits, sorted and disco 2000. However, common people is in a league of its own. I suspect Pulp could never write another song like this if they lived to be a hundred.
What makes this CD even more incredible for me now are the memories that come flying back from 10 years ago. Do yourself a favour and buy this CD or if you've already got it listen to it again, you wont be disappointed I promise.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 19 November 2011
You might think 22 pounds is much for a simple non-gatefold record. Well in this case it isn't. The record is presented in a high-quality jacket and more importantly the sound is amazing. Music On Vinyl is starting to become one of my favorite vinyl publishers after this and the Blackwater Park release; flawlessly done. This is no exception.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 19 July 2005
Finding this CD recently tucked away at the back of my cupboard is a crime I probably deserve suitable punishment for, but after dusting it off and slamming it in the CD player it's been nearly played to death over the past month or so.
12 pumping tracks, each with their own relevance and meaning, whether it's the angry rallying cry of being different in the stomping opening of "mis-fits" or the sex fuelled desire of the next track "pencil skirt". Jarvis Cocker's subject matter ranges from the everyday lives of the back street working classes to the mind numbing ignorance of the rave scene.
The two "hits" from the album "Disco 2000" and "Common People" shouldn't be overlooked as easy "made for radio" singles either. The fierce fury in the tone of "Common People" is plain for all to see; railing against the meaningless lives played out by the working class it is still an awfully powerful song and no less relevant today as it was back in the mid-90's.
Several other reviewers here have recalled the music scene at the time of the release of this album, and the media led band war between Oasis and Blur. What could be said is that this album has stood the test of time far better than the more throw away pop of Blur or the macho posturing of Oasis and still come out with a great level of pertinence and integrity. Anyone looking to expand their record collections with some memories of the Britpop era could do no better than to start with this gem of an album.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 25 August 2005
If you consider how badly dated many of the albums that surfaced around the Britpop era of the '90s were, you'd come to albums like this with an unsettling aura of 'those memories' etc. or just because you want to hear an album by Pulp, for instance. However, this is the album that really encompassed Britpop. Pulp always were considered outsiders, which was probably reflected by their Smiths influences (see Blur and Suede). The essense of Britpop, however, was to encompass the Englishness of that influential band as well as reacting to the American domination of the early 90s (Guns 'N' Roses, Nirvana et al.) The final track is the most endearing track of the whole Britpop era. Witty tales of longing love and a shotgun towards Cocker's repressed lifestyle, it is here that you know that Pulp really made it - with an album of such quality. Everyone's heard 'Common People' and, probably, 'Mis-Shapes' by now so buying this album is a really good option.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 1 November 2011
Finally someone has pressed this album on plastic to stop these ridiculous hyper-inflated prices of the 2nd hand market. The original pressing is swapping hands consistently for between £50 & £90. Please saturate the market, and most importantly let us hear this music on the best format available......................LP

Thanks. Copy on way & needle poised!
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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on 12 July 2000
"Different Class" is possibly the most perfect album produced in the last twenty years. It certainly is the best I've heard in the last decade. Brilliant and diverse music with worthy lyrics (especially for the definitive "Common People", which is so perfectly constructed and performed, with every one of Cocker's vocal nuances adding another layer, that it must be a strong contender for the title of best song ever), each song contributes to the album's overall feel of the frustration the young feel about the old and the poor feel about the rich. "Disco 2000" and "Sorted for E's and Wizz" are obviously wonderful, but my personal favourite is "Something Changed" which is both hilarious and heartbreaking. All-in-all, an album that touches upon perfection.
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on 7 June 2008
Jarvis Cocker has done revolutionary things within his life time the most recent was in 1996 when he mooned Michael 'Creepy' Jackson at the Brits. In doing so he marked the begining of the down fall of the self proclaimed King of Pop and kiddie fiddle at large.

The first great thing however was 1994s `Different Class'! I forgot all about this album I loved as a young teen however I recently began playing it again, and with a new adult ear I was blown away at the passion and social statements evident in all lyrics! Take `common people' a song about middle class people wanting to pretend to be poor ! With the lyrics "You will never understand
how it feels to live your life with no meaning or control". Truly inspirational and clever. My other favorite tracks are the drug fueled "sorted for Es and wiz" that anybody whos ever dropped an E will relate with and the bitter sweet "Live bed show" which tells a storey ! This album is full of passion and lyrics that actually mean something!!!

Forget all the rubbish indie bands these days they all post modern poor hybreds , Pulp are orginal talented and way beyond the boring commercialism that infects our charts in 2008 !

buy this album !
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