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4.4 out of 5 stars
Day of the Dead [DVD]
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Anchor bay have always been a good label but now the foray into the world of HD for them on blu ray. Day of the dead is one of the first releases on the labels initial hd output and its a welcome treat.

Don't be expecting a transfer akin to the blockbusters of the last couple of years as this is a 20 yr old low budget horror but this is a nice upgrade ove r the standard dvd.

As you would expect the daytime scenes look the best,depth to the image is noticably better as are the colours. The bunker scenes come off the worse but still lokk better than dvd. The tunnel sequence near the end looked alot better..blacks were rock solid..my old dvd had a washed out black look but here looks fab.

Great film and decent if not mindblowing hd transfer make this a good package.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
I had never seen any of Romeros zombie movies, and so decided to purchase them all, watching them back to back for the first time last night. This was my second favourite of the trilogy after Dawn of the dead.
Not much happenes in this movie for the first 45 minutes or so, and there seems to be alot of unnecessary dialouge which adds little towards the final product. However the setting of the movie was a great idea, and some of the gore effects were brilliant, although this isn't anywhere near as violent or bloody as DOTD.
Overall, it's worth buying definatley. The zombie makeup effects are the best here then in the two previous movies, although the corny music can sometimes be rather annoying.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 1 April 2006
The moment this DVD was released I could not help buying it... mainly because I'm a sucker for the two words Special Edition (and Extended Edition). The quality is good and the sound is nice and clear, the only draw back is the annoyingly cheap music.
Day of the Dead is far darker, gritty and claustrophobic than Romero's previous comic-book-style Dawn of the Dead and Night of the Living Dead. The heavy amount of swearing (some, I have noticed, has been dubbed over) just makes the scenes more real and more intense. The effects are the best I've seen (the tearing flesh effect is gross and a little too real at times) and the characters are very three dimensional, even the villain of the picture (played, with great malice, by Joe Pilato) is cruel and unpredictable. The highlight of the film has to be the zombie, Bub. He is sweet and probably my favourite zombie of the whole quadrilogy (ever really felt for a rotting flesh eater, you will with him).
As for the bonus disc, the extra features are good and the 37 minute documentary gives great insight into the feature, especially Howard Sherman (Bub) revealing how he went about playing his role. But I still feel it could have gone a bit deeper into the making - I wanted to know all about the effects from the jawless zombie you see in the beginning of the film. Although Day (after a few viewings) has now become my second favourite and has an epic opening scene in a (un)dead city, I still can't shake the feeling that it could have been much more. But don't let that dissuade you from getting it. Day of the Dead is a real treat for your blood lust and need for Romero zombie movie.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on 2 March 2001
Despite being dismissed by many critics as a mere excercise in splatter, Day Of The Dead is, put simply, the best zombie film ever made; in some ways surpassing even Romero's own achievements on the other classic films in the series, Night Of the Living Dead and Dawn Of the Dead. It is a much more mature and intelligent film than the others in the series, and has loftier goals.
When the film opens, humanity is effectively lost, it's few representatives outnumbered as they are by several hundred thousand to one in favour of the walking dead. Only a few scientists and their military protectors survive, huddled into a missile silo in Florida, where they work to find some sort of defense against the marauding threat. It is of course hopeless, but there may be a glimmer of hope left, if they can find a way to domesticate the zombies.
How many horror films have the guts to start the film by saying, 'It's all over. There ain't no going back'? This one sure does.
Exceptional writing and directing from George A. Romero, gruesome effects from the maestro, Tom Savini and wonderful acting from Lori Cardille, Joe Pilato, Gary Klar and the late Richard Liberty this is the horror DVD that no self-respecting fan of the genre can afford to be without.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 4 May 2003
The third and final film of the George A.Romero zombie trilogy and by far the most gory.The walking dead have taken over the world and only a small band of the living survive.This group of scientists and soldiers are barricaded in an underground base,where the chief scientist is conducting grotesque research experiments on the zombies.Dvd extras-widescreen edition(letterbox format digitally re-mastered)-scene selections-behind the scenes footage-horror trailers-biograpthies- filmograpthies-photogallery.Great package for fans of the genre.It looks like the BBFC have not made any substantial cutting to this film this is about as close to the definetive version as your going to get,until the Anamorphic widescreen 5.1dolby edition comes out towards the end of this year on region 1!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
There are multiple versions on BLU RAY of this legendary horrorfest - but a word of warning to fans in the UK.

The American BLU RAY 'Collector's Edition' release on 'Shout Factory' is REGION-A LOCKED - so it WILL NOT PLAY on most UK Blu Ray players unless they're chipped to play 'all' regions (which the vast majority aren't). Don't confuse BLU RAY players that have multi-region capability on the 'DVD' front - that won't help.

Buy the 'Arrow' version - it's REGION B and will play (even if the transfer has been called into question by some fans)...or the 'Anchor Bay' version which is said to have the best transfer...
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Recently I've been upgrading my collection of what I think of as 'Modern Classic Horror Films' to BD. As Kim Newman suggests in his book 'Nightmare Movies', the post-Gothic, Modern Horror film appeared with 'Night of the Living Dead' in 1968. For me, by the end of the 1980s, the genre was in terminal decline, so the kind of films I've been purchasing for maybe the third time has included the aforementioned Romero classic (which looks fabulous on the official BD), 'The Texas Chainsaw Massacre', 'Halloween', the works of Dario Argento between 1975-1982 and the like.

I saw 'Day of the Dead' at the cinema when it first appeared. While it doesn't have the immediate iconic appeal of 'Night' and 'Dawn', I've always felt it is a great film and easily the most consistent and even of the initial 'Dead' trilogy (I won't mention the second trilogy). The film is of a piece, flowing seamlessly from one scene to the next, with superior effects and music to its predecessors, with no jarring moments - for me some of the library music of 'Night' ruins the consistency of the film, while to my way of thinking, there is not yet a definitive cut of 'Dawn' - the ideal version for me would be a revision of the extended cut that incorporated the additional thrills and violence of the European cut and featuring only the music by Goblin, albeit pumped up in the mix...and all of this on bluray in hidef, DTS 5.1, naturally. I can dream.

'Day of the Dead', however, can't really be improved, except in terms of quality of presentation. The Arrow UK 3 disc edition incorporates all the special features from the previous US divimax edition DVD on 2 DVDs (plus the film on DVD) and of course, a BD disc.

Arrow are by now well known for delivering inconsistent results on BD. To be fair, you can't make a silk purse from a sow's ear, but when a film as technically proficient as Argento's 'Tenebrae' ends up with a worse transfer than Fulci's 'Zombi 2' (aka 'Zombie Flesh eaters' something is amiss - not to dis the Fulci, it's a cracking feature and my enjoyment of it has been improved enormously by Arrow's stunning transfer, despite the 6 seconds of missing footage at the start of the film), you know that their quality control needs questioning. who is in charge at the office, Arrow?

The BD of 'Day' looks better than the divimax DVD, but is a disappointment: so many of the well-lit sequences seem very soft-focussed, especially in the backgrounds, while the foregrounds sometimes fail too - in numerous scenes the actors' faces lack the sharpness one expects from good cinematography and proper bluray mastering. The darker scenes in the mine are absolutely fine and the gore sequences are pretty amazing. Although this is a big improvement on the DVD versions - the blues have the kind of steeliness only seen on DVD and theatrically - I still feel a better transfer must be possible. No way were the actors' faces out of focus when filmed...

Overall, this BD doesn't approach the quality of 'Suspiria' and Arrow's 'Zombie Flesh Eaters' - and remember, these were Italian films both made some years before 'Day of the Dead'. Another worthy comparison is the Blue Underground BD of 'the Living Dead at Manchester Morgue', which looks amazing -and this was a cheapish film made in 1974 (and to my mind, the best living dead movie of them all after 'Night').

Finally, I'd urge fans to seek out the recent double CD reissue of the soundtrack - not listed on amazon - from the USA, as it's a stunning bit of work and massively underrated.
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on 13 October 2011
Day of the Dead is Writer/ Director George A Romero's third and final (and third) film in his original (good) zombie trilogy. Released in 1985, almost 10 years after Dawn of the Dead and 20 after Night of the Living Dead (his first `grown up' feature), this third installment was greeted with initially bad reviews and a poor financial return (of the dead)! This was mostly (probably) due to the bleak nature of the film and the fact that it veered far from the comic book antics of Dawn of the Dead, presenting a more realistic, harsh and in some ways depressing atmosphere.
As with its predecessor, Day of the Dead is not a direct `sequel' to Dawn and doesn't share any of the characters or locations from the previous film, instead telling a new story set during the same zombie apocalypse/outbreak...thingy! Again, the viewer is not told directly or obviously what's going on, and the actual cause of the outbreak is never revealed (they mention briefly in the original Night of the Living dead that it may have come down on a meteorite).
The plot centers on a group of survivors, um...surviving in an old underground army base/ fallout shelter or something. We learn that this group was hastily put together before the outbreak completely took over the world and consists mainly of scientists and soldiers. The scientists are trying to figure out what is bringing the dead back to life while the soldiers are rapidly losing patience, causing tension (and a `lot' of swearing) between each group! Major Cooper (whom we never actually see...alive anyway) dies while some of the main characters are checking along the coast for survivors, leaving the brash and angry Captain Rhodes in charge. He has lost all patience with the scientist's apparent slow progress and just wants to get `the hell out of here' in the helicopter (which can only be piloted by one of the main characters named John).
Meanwhile Dr `Frankenstein' Logan is trying to domesticate and control the zombies rather than looking for a way to stop them. This frustrates Sarah (scientist and Ripley-ish female lead) as she is looking into more practical research and trying to discover how the dead are re-animating, hoping to discover a way to reverse it. It is at this point that we are introduced to Bub, the semi-docile zombie which Logan is training. Special mention must go to Bub (played by Sherman Howard) as it is probably the best zombie performance and one of the best zombie make-ups ever! We see that Bub has been `tamed' as he doesn't display the same aggressive, single-minded behavior that the other undead...um...display (basically, he doesn't just want to eat everyone in sight).
Things come to a (dead) head later, however, when it is revealed that Dr Logan's way of taming the zombies is to feed them tasty buckets of Captain Rhode's dead men as a reward for their good (or un-undead) behavior. Rhodes finds out, kills Logan and attempts to flee the base, but John won't fly him out and Sarah and Bill (another `sweary' main character) have to fight their way through some zombies in an attempt to get to the helicopter as well. Through a series of squishy and violent events, the zombies are let into the underground bunker and over-run the base, killing all of the remaining soldiers, who are mostly `baddies' anyway. John, Sarah and Bill escape in the helicopter to a tropical island to presumably live out their remaining days in paradise away from the zombie menace!
The incredible zombie effects are once again created by the legendary Tom `legend' Savini (who is a legend), with the help of Greg Nicotero (of KNB effects) who also plays a minor role in the film as one of the (not so baddie) soldiers. Unlike in Dawn of the Dead, this time Savini gets to design and make a lot of `unique' zombie appliances, so that pretty much every zombie seen on screen is distinctive, rather than the simpler `greyed up face' approach used in Dawn. Savini has said that Day of the Dead is his special effects masterpiece and I'd definitely agree.
Did I mention that there's a lot of swearing in this film? Probably, but it's worth another mention...there is a `lot' of swearing in this film!! All of the characters have `potty' mouths but the award goes to the character Bill, who has three f**ks in a single shouted sentence!
The acting is very good as well. It's funny how it's only generally noticeable in this type of film when the acting is dire (see Zombies the Beginning for proof of this), but in Day of the Dead, as in Night and Dawn (of the deads) the actors perform well and the situations and character interactions are believable.
Overall then, this is a brilliant, well acted and written film. In a way I think of it as the first `serious' or `grown up' (or should that be `groan' up) zombie movie. It's a brilliant and fitting end to Romero's original trilogy and still features the best zombie make up seen in any film ever...fact...well, uh...in my opinion.....

Overall score: 5 Docile Zombies out of 5
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on 3 December 2004
Day Of the dead is the most intense claustrophobic chiller ever made, the charachters and their predicament is brought to life by george romero,s scripting and direction. still to this day it stands out as a one off in the horror movie pantheon because the sense of cartoon violence that was insipid through dawn of the dead has been replaced by a real sense of nihilism and hate.
i think that had this of been a thriller it would of won a oscar for the screenplay and acting.
george romero was completely dissatisfied with the end product
due to lack of funding for the project.
upon its release in the 80,s the film was considered to brutal for regular audience consumption which is a shame really as this movie is as bleak and as powerful as kubricks a clockwork orange.
george romeros idea for zombie domestiction was obviously a sneak preview as to what would happen in the fourth part of his dead saga had day been a huge success.
so when someone writes reviews about his work this is his most controversial movie to date and still divides people, everyone loves n.o.t.l.d. and dawn of the dead but it is day of the dead which shows you romeros true vision it is a work of art as with works of art sometimes its uncomfortble to look at but your compelled to. day of the dead pure genius and hopefully land of the dead romeros latest edition to this saga will continue to delight and disgust at the same time. day of the dead a horrific nightmarish piece of motion picture history.
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on 10 February 2003
The third installment of this trilogy of films by director George A. Romero, has a much more darker and desperate feel to it than its predecessors. Set in an underground facility created to investigate the now widespread problem of zombies, the research team assigned to this task encounter nothing but contempt from the soldiers protecting them. Mainly due to their sense of isolation at being the only survivors in the immediate area. It is the friction created by these two very separate groups of people and the situation that they find themselves in, which makes the movie so enduring and entertaining despite its age. The token mad scientist thrown in to provide the films more horrific moments doesn't help matters, though his training of the zombie "bub" is very interesting to say the least. My only criticism about this movie is the weak ending but, the post apocalyptic storyline is so atmospheric you won't really care.
The level of gore in this is amazing with the effects creators almost having a "candyland" experience with what they could achieve within the budget. Watch out for the opening sequences soundbite used in the song M1A1 by the gorillaz, as although this is classic cinema and should be taken with a pinch of salt, the soundtrack is cringingly 80's esque.
All in all, it is a worthy ending for this highly entertaining series of films, a must see movie for all fans of the genre.
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