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46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A proper remaster for Roeg's chilling masterpiece.
Nicolas Roeg's stylish and frightening occult thriller has gained in critical appreciation since it was originally released nearly four decades ago(!), and this extras-laden Blu-Ray set does it justice by gathering together the various supplemental features from earlier home video editions along with newly shot interviews with Donald Sutherland and additional crew...
Published on 30 Jun. 2011 by Anthony J. Thorne

versus
96 of 104 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars still big problems with the SOUND on this release
a 5 star film without doubt BUT like the previous R2 release, this 'special edition' is still plagued with dreadful sound - harsh, trebly, distorted and with absurd amounts of noise reduction. Why Why Why. Roeg fans will want the commentary but there's nothing else new here and for the film, stick with the R1 edition. Sorry to sound like a geek but it makes me so angry,...
Published on 31 Mar. 2007 by G. Davies


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46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A proper remaster for Roeg's chilling masterpiece., 30 Jun. 2011
By 
Anthony J. Thorne (Melbourne, Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Nicolas Roeg's stylish and frightening occult thriller has gained in critical appreciation since it was originally released nearly four decades ago(!), and this extras-laden Blu-Ray set does it justice by gathering together the various supplemental features from earlier home video editions along with newly shot interviews with Donald Sutherland and additional crew members. I doubt anyone will be too disappointed with the extras on this disc. That noted, the audio and visual remaster featured on this Blu-Ray is of particular importance as it offers a significant upgrade in both picture and sound to all earlier home video editions. The colourful picture is noticeably sharper than earlier DVD editions and does a great job of showcasing Roeg's remarkable, often near-hallucinatory imagery. Perhaps even more importantly, the sound is equally improved and eliminates the various distortion issues that plagued earlier DVD releases. DON'T LOOK NOW came out on DVD in both the USA and UK a few years back and various online forums did their best to decide which of the two sounded superior. Sadly, each DVD sounded pretty rotten and did little justice to the film, the dialogue or Pino Donaggio's haunting score. This new Blu-Ray (proudly displaying a cover sticker noting "Picture and Audio Restoration Supervised and Approved by Nic Roeg") fixes those issues entirely and presents the movie in a clearly listenable form for perhaps the first time on home video. It sounds terrific.

DON'T LOOK NOW is a masterpiece and this Blu-Ray provides a definite, welcome upgrade from any DVD edition you might own. Now, could someone do a special edition of Roeg's weird, sexy and stylish EUREKA?
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mysterious, cryptic...use of imagination necessary!, 22 Dec. 2005
By 
This review is from: Don't Look Now [DVD] [1973] (DVD)
Don't Look Now is not so much a horror film as a psychological thriller. It stars Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland as husband and wife, John and Laura Baxter, who lose their young daughter in a drowning accident in England. However, the majority of the film takes place against the backdrop of the dilapidated ruins and dark alleyways of Venice where the couple involuntarily meet a pair of mysterious, slightly creepy old English sisters, one of whom is both blind and psychic. She informs Laura that their daughter is trying to communicate with them from beyond the grave and as the film unravels it becomes apparent that the message is more of a warning that something macabre may happen to John.
The film is littered with hints and cryptic symbolism which can be read into on many levels. The use of colour, particularly red, runs through the film, uniting several themes and evoking unspoken ideas about passion, danger, murder and blood.
The pace is fairly slow and some scenes don’t appear to make much sense, however, I believe this has been done on purpose so that the viewer can interpret the film through individual eyes and it is ultimately up to the viewer to decide the sense of the ending.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great drama and surprises, 20 Jan. 2010
By 
John Baxter (Sutherland) and his wife Laura (Christie) struggle to move on after their daughter's death and when in Venice they meet a blind psychic who sees the spirit of their daughter.

Based on Daphne Du Maurier's fantastic novel, this British film aims high to depict the hard nature of a story transfixed with powerful and emotionally involved deaths the tough bond of marriage and all the while, Don't look Now will please neutrals if reader's of the book may feel a little hard done by.

The opening montage is a brilliant selection of the type of film we viewers are gearing up. Two children playing apparently safely are left on their own by their parents who are mixed up in their own world. What follows is a striking shot in which Donald Sutherland's John sprints out of the house and we see a high angled shot looking down into the expressionless eyes of his daughter, floating in the water. This scene is staggering, made powerful through the sudden shock of aimless playing and a father trying his best to save her.

Whilst the film begins with the grizzly opening the book opens with the married couple sat in the restaurant discussing the people around them.

Changing tactic from calm to shocking allows us to be engrossed into proceedings and sets the upcoming drama. I confess to not loving this change, particularly after witnessing the too quick cut from Laura's view of John clutching their daughter. Nevertheless the rest of the film picks up the dramatic implication of the tragedy as the cut switches into the restaurant where the sisters are introduced.

The beauty of a book is imagination and to adapt such a provocative story such as this makes our assumptions different. When reading the novel I found the psychic to be a bit more reserved, a little less forward. The scripting and seizures Hilary Mason goes through as Helen are a tad awkward, bit of a contradictory to the calm nature of the psychic in the novel.

For a short story at around 50 pages its amazing to squeeze a two hour film out of. There are notes of improvisation where events happen on screen rather than in the book, such as the vivacious love scene, the wandering around the streets at night and the collapsing sequence in the church. All brilliant, if lacking a bit of author magic. There are many little things that add up to such a consistent feeling, such as the red themes and calm feel of Venice despite the hidden crime details.

What was a slight disappointment was the lack of focus on the murder spree happening in Venice, a touch more detail and the ending would have felt more personal. The sound is terribly loud and warbled
Nevertheless this is a shocking provocative adaptation that will entertain and delight many, especially for the neutral who will be in for many surprises.

7/10
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The figure in the red raincoat . . . . ., 15 Mar. 2000
By 
Ben Elliss (Reading, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This landmark film is a classic. Partly an examination of grief's effects on a family and partly a psychological horror-thriller, it is engaging until the last seconds. Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland play a distraught couple, travelling around Europe to erase the memory of their daughter's drowning. When they arrive in Venice, however, they find hints that the girl may, in fact, still be alive. The ending of this film outdoes 'Carrie' for shock value - it has the potential to give you nightmares for several weeks after seeing the movie!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No Problems With The Sound On My Copy, 7 July 2011
By 
R. Mier "dickymier" (UK) - See all my reviews
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I bought the film version of Don't Look Now a few days ago as I saw a stage version of it at Basingstoke a few years ago, and I absolutley enjoyed it. After reading some of the negative comments about the sound quality on this special edition DVD, I was a bit reluctant to purchase this. Well I decided to bite the bullet and buy a copy and to my surprise the soundtrack is very very good, considering it is a very old film. Either some of the copies of the DVD's were a bad batch or people were perhaps expecting too much from an old film such as this.

Anyway all that aside, this has to be one of the most chilling & facsinating thrillers of alltime. Don't expect a gorefest as it is not that sort of film, but for those who like good thrillers you won't be disappointed.
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96 of 104 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars still big problems with the SOUND on this release, 31 Mar. 2007
By 
G. Davies (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
a 5 star film without doubt BUT like the previous R2 release, this 'special edition' is still plagued with dreadful sound - harsh, trebly, distorted and with absurd amounts of noise reduction. Why Why Why. Roeg fans will want the commentary but there's nothing else new here and for the film, stick with the R1 edition. Sorry to sound like a geek but it makes me so angry, this fantastic film deserves better.
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48 of 52 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best British films ever made, 25 July 2002
By 
P. Sanders "prhsuk" (Belfast) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Don't Look Now [DVD] [1973] (DVD)
I first saw this film as a teenager on a black and white TV late at night. I didn't know much about the film except that it was a horror film of sorts. I soon found that it was so much more. As the film progressed it got very late, but I knew I couldn't go to bed until it was over. It left me speechless. The direction, the acting, the music, and especially the feeling of escalating dread - what would happen at the end? The ending not only surprised me, but actually made me gasp in shock.
A couple, bereaved after their daughter's death, stay awhile in wintry Venice. Two elderly sisters claim to be in contact with the dead girl, but are they telling the truth, or are they con artists? Add to this a series of strange events and a murderer terrorising the city...
This could have been (and indeed sounds like) a cheap horror flick. The reason "Don't Look Now" is a classic (an overused word, but true in this case) is that we care about the Baxters. Sutherland and Christie are thoroughly believable, especially when they have lines about the occult that could easily be corny. The same is true of Roeg's direction - instead of cheese we get a real sensation of doom. Rather than picture-postcard Venice we have rats, crumbling buildings and a bleakly-coloured maze full of confusion.
We are also left wondering about the supporting cast (even at the end we are not sure of everyone's good character). The two dotty old sisters. The shifty priest. The hotel manager. Even the police detective seems a little suspicious. Visual motifs recur - a child's ball, the red of the dead girl's coat - are they hints from the dead girl to her parents?
Of course the film is famous for its sex scene, and it is justly celebrated. A scene of love-making is inter-cut with shots of the couple dressing for dinner. This is one of the few cases in film where the scene is necessary to the story - the couple have become distant but the meeting with the two sisters may actually have brought them back together. It is also (if this is the right word) tastefully done - a very human scene depicting true love and not just sex.
"Don't Look Now" is a wonderful puzzle - eerie, tragic, human and until the last scenes, maddeningly hard to solve. When all is revealed, you want to go back and start again.
One last point: this is based on a short story by the great Daphne duMaurier. After she saw the film, she sent the director a letter saying how the couple in his film reminded her of a sad couple she once saw in a hotel and imagined why they were so unhappy - the real-life couple who inspired her original story. I think this shows how Roeg has given the film a real believability and humanity.
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36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There's nothing wrong with the soundtrack !, 5 July 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a brief comment on the warnings about the poor quality of the soundtrack on Don't Look Now.

I'm referring below to the Blu Ray version of this film which was released by Studio Canal on July 4 2011 and I'm writing this for the benefit of those who might be worried that this version might still contain the audio problem referred to by others.

This version of the film has been digitally restored under the supervision and with the approval of the Director Nic Roeg. I can assure those interested that the audio quality of this version is fine, given that it was recorded in mono, and is presented here in mono. There is no hiss or any other sound problem with the audio track and my system is a reasonably sophisticated one. The TV is a 60" Pioneer KRP 600A, the AV amp is a Denon AVR 2809, the Blu Ray disc player is a Denon DVD 2500BT and the speakers are B&W 684s at the front and B&W 686s at the rear. I can assure you that if this problem was still there this set up would pick it up.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic British Film, 4 April 2012
By 
Keith M - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Nicolas Roeg's 1973 film Don't Look Now (based on the Daphne Du Maurier short story of the same name) is one of my all-time favourite films and for me ranks as one of the finest British films ever made alongside greats such as Kes, The Third Man, If..., The Red Shoes, The Magdalene Sisters, Secrets and Lies, etc. Whilst on the surface the film could be regarded as being part of the 'horror film' genre (indeed the blurb on DVD cover I have quotes The Times making reference to the film as such), for me, this is far too simplistic a tag with which to label this most subtle and complex of films. Indeed, everything about the film is unconventional and understated and its effect on the viewer can be summed up most accurately by the quote relating to the film from director Roeg, namely 'Everything is not as it seems'.

The film stars established British actress Julie Christie and Canadian Donald Sutherland as the married couple Laura and John Baxter, but, for me, the undoubted star of the film is the film's setting of Venice itself. In Don't Look Now, director (and ex-cinematographer) Roeg and his director of photography Anthony Richmond have created one of the most visually stunning films ever made, filled with visual references that lead the viewer and foretell of the mysterious and macabre developments that are to befall the married couple as they visit Venice for John's work as a church renovator. Linking the tragic events at the start of the film by means of repeated shots of water (in the pond at the couple's UK home, rain pouring onto cars, through to arrival in the city built upon water and the spilling of water onto a restaurant floor) and shots of the colour red (the daughter's mackintosh, a spilled fluid on a developing photograph, a suspicious figure stalking the streets of Venice) to the film's eventual denouement, the film's creators instil in the mind of the viewer a sense of unease and fatalistic coincidence.

On the acting front, Sutherland and, especially, Christie have never been better, whilst Hilary Mason is a truly haunting presence playing Hilary, the blind psychic, with whom the Baxters' fates become inextricably linked. Renato Scarpa is also brilliantly creepy as Inspector Longhi, the Venetian policeman charged with looking into the apparent disappearance of Laura.

The film is, of course, also notable for the controversial sex scene between Sutherland and Christie. Whilst this may have been regarded as unusually explicit at the time, it now appears (actually) as one of the most tender and passionate love (rather than sex) scenes to appear on film, and one that is not out of place in such a stunning piece of art as is this film.

A final mention should also be made of the superb soundtrack composed by Venetian Pino Donaggio. This alternates from sweepingly melodic and lush arrangements to quite idiosyncratic and sparse sounds which accompany some of the more suspense-filled passages of the film.

Quite simply, a masterpiece.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Saw trilogy?, 6 Sept. 2007
By 
Mr. Colin Rankin "Colin Rankin" (Braintree, essex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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'Don't Look Now' is no Saw trilogy.
It is not meant to be a blood and guts silly version of so-called horror.
I find it unbelievable that anyone should compare this masterpiece to Saw.Fundamentally this is one of the most emotionally chilling films ever made....you just need half a brain to watch it.
Yes,it is an old film....I just wish many modern films could do the same...the red riding hood sequence at the end is a stunner because the film simply does not lead you to expect it...not a silly predictable film but a much more cerebral one about parents emotions and fears after the loss of a child.....'Saw'.somebody is having me on!
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Don't Look Now  (Digitally Restored) [DVD] [1973]
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