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220 of 231 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still A Dark Horse
A documentary on a music celebrity can be measured by content (what footage did they access and who was willing to contribute?) and insight (what new light did it shed on the subject?). On the first point Martin Scorsese knocks the ball out of the park. Though I didn't feel I knew George any better than before by the end, I was treated to nearly four hours of dazzling and...
Published on 5 Oct 2011 by Matt Blick

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75 of 86 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars DELUXE EDITION REVIEW
As almost every review here concentrates on the film, I've decided to limit mine to the Deluxe Edition itself...

THE HD TRANSFER:
In a word: Incredible! Living In The Material World draws from every recording medium of the last 60 years, from super 8 to 35mm, VHS to HD video, all of which is rendered beautifully across this 1080p disc. The filmmakers have...
Published on 12 Oct 2011 by Chankos


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful tribute, 17 Sep 2012
By 
Paul (Planet Earth) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: George Harrison - Living in the Material World [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
George Harrison's amazing life and work is well represented in this superb film by Martin Scorsese.

The footage is outstanding and so are the tributes from fellow musicians and friends alike, no more so than Ringo Starr's tearful nod to his old friend.

Anyone who is in anyway interested in music biographies should really watch this as George fitted so much into his career (even though he had a couple of periods of relative inactivity) although I felt they could have looked at the post 1974 era in a bit more depth but as a movie the whole thing works brilliantly.

Oh, and of course the music is outstanding....
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth seeing, but you'd have to be a big fan to want to own it, 29 Dec 2011
By 
Johnnybluetime - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Not reallt worth owning, I think.There are far too many things wrong with this documentary for me to ever want to watch it again.Okay, it passes the time and I probably would watch it if it was on TV, but I don't think I'd ever seek it out again.

What did I take away from the film?That George was a nice enough bloke,but eastern spirituality aside, a bit of a cliche who spent his middle years jamming with other "nice blokes" like Joe Brown, gardening and cheating on his wife.Possibly his greatest achievement was Handmade Films, which does get a fair bit of airtime here, and of course, All Things Must Pass for which,in the film,Phil Spector claims George had "literally more than a hundred songs each one better than the last".Curious then that they could only fill 2 discs of a triple album before resorting to a disc of jamming.The fact it was a triple album in the first place smacks a bit of canny marketing on Spector and Harrison's part, but he might have been better advised to have released it as 2 or 3 albums over a couple of years or so.That aside it is a great album, but the paucity of material after ten years of The Beatles merely confirms he was very much only the third best songwriter in the band.His guitar playing doesn't get much coverage either, which is curious given the lengthy interview with Clapton,although that largely concentrates on his affair with Patti Harrison.

As for the man himself;well, the film suffers badly from Olivia Harrison's involvement.Understandably, she does her level best to skirt over the many contradictions of a spiritual man who seemed obsessed by money, one of his first songs was Taxman and, realising he was dying,he bought a house in Switzerland to cheat HMRC out of death duties - change the name from George Harrison to Philip Green and even his most ardent fans might deplore such naked tax avoidance by a multi millionare.It is also seems very likely that he was a serial adulterer, not the most spiritual trait in a loving person and unfortunately, because the film doesn't shed any light on these and other issues, it's easy for the viewer to come away with a quite negative view of Harrison.

Neither does it really cover his musical career and aside from cherry picking almost every great song from All Things Must Pass Harrison's solo career barely gets a mention - I can't even remember whether any material from the album Living In the Material World was used - and if there was there's nothing between that and the Wilburys.And nothing after them either.Okay, so most of it wasn't great, but I suspect even the most slavish biog of McCartney is going to mention The Frog Chorus, Pipes Of Peace and C Moon, I think Scorcese could have found at least something worthwhile in Harrison's ten other solo album outings.Instead,it too often comes across as a trite hagiography compiled of easily available film clips, spiced up with some newer private footage.That might not be the case and I'm sure wasn't the intention,but there are just too many gaps for it to be the definitive biographical film.However, whether Harrison deserves better is debatable - if he warrants a three and a half hour film McCartney is going to need twenty four hours.However, it is also a timely reminder of his central role in introducing Indian music to the Western masses.

So,overall, enjoyable.Passed the time pleasantly.I can't say I learnt anything new, but I suppose it did leave me wondering about certain aspects of his life.Like I say, he seemed like a nice enough bloke and a talented musician who happened to be trapped in the biggest band in the world with perhaps pop's greatest songwriters.The trouble is the film gives the impression that Harrison was less talented than he actually was.In truth it's more another Beatles documentary and there's lots of nice footage for Beatles fans and more than anything it made me want to play their albums. But most of all it's frustrating and not one of Scorsese's better moments.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Master of music, 6 Dec 2011
By 
Amazon Customer (HORLEY, SURREY England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: George Harrison - Living in the Material World [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
George in his Beatle heyday was funny and imaginative yet he still retained a certain enigma, this is, to some degree shown in the story.
He continued to explore his mystic element which played a large part in his later life. In addition his music skills developed far in excess of anything written with the Beatles.
He explored drugs wrote some wonderful songs which will be standards for many days to come. The film shows most of Georges characters some good some bad. I found George fascinating and I will always remember him as my favourite Beatle. If you like George Harrison, you will like this film.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My sweet George, 6 Dec 2011
By 
J. Edmonds (Derby, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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I thoroughly enjoyed this documentary of the legendary George Harrison. The dvd is broken up into two discs. The first concentrating on his time in the Beatles most of which has been covered in previous countless documentaries about the group. The second (for me) is the more entertaining, covering his solo career and work after the split. I would have liked more extras on the disc - perhaps some of George's music videos, or more footage from the Concert for Bangladesh.

This documentary reminds me of how good George Harrison was at producing quality music, and I loved how he developed his unique slide guitar sound. Martin Scorsese delivers the film in a different way - the interviews are concise and poignant. I particularly enjoyed the interviews with Olivia, Dhani and the Wilbury's.

I recommend this dvd to all fans of George's life and music.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fubbalo view, 3 Dec 2011
Post Beatle era I always reckoned that George had some real talent, which of course blossumed in the Travelling Wilburys. So it was great to see this work on his life, I was not disapointed with this movie and I will watch it again (and again no doubt). Great Stuff.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars thoughtful, 2 Dec 2011
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This review is from: George Harrison - Living in the Material World [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
very good well researched insightful and thought provoking, and thats just in the first 5 minutes. a remarkable guitarist and musician, along with his spiritual
journey made for a totally engrossing and at times moving account of his all to
short life.

all glories to sri krsna.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A moving and very interesting documentary, 1 Dec 2011
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I bought this DVD as a Christmas present for my boyfriend but it actually came on the BBC in November so we watched it then! I am very happy to pass the DVD on to someone else and have since bought another. We both found it a beautiful, informative and moving documentary. I think anyone with even a remote interest in The Beatles would enjoy it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great film, surprising revelation for me, 29 Nov 2011
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I have always admired George Harrison (his songs mostly, as I didn't know the man). I thought the film really gave insight to the man himself and the link to his music and life. The surprising revelation for me was about Olivia Harrison. What a down-to-earth, emotionally intelligent woman. I was struck by her honesty, insights and great sense of humour. Would love to hang out over a coffee (not tea) just to hear her thoughts on spirituality and have a few laughs. Overall, a great film that is worth seeing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enlightening, 28 Nov 2011
This review is from: George Harrison - Living in the Material World [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
This Bluray/DVD gives interesting insights into the mind and life of one of the most underestimated and underrated musicians of the 20th century! Though a Beatle he was widely seen as the silent guy behind Lennon/McCartney. This documentary shows his true influx and potential.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars george harrison, 28 Nov 2011
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George Harrison-living in the material world is a great doco about a great musician and a great song writer..I think everyone would enjoy this DVD..Beatles fans or not
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