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43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb package - cinema to treasure
In his "Three Colours" trilogy, Kieslowski takes a handful of people whose destinies are irretrievably welded together as an expression of liberty, equality, and fraternity, and presents their lives and the decisions which have led them to come together.
The trilogy is a wonderful piece of art. Relating the three colours of the French flag to the mantra of the...
Published on 28 Mar. 2005 by Budge Burgess

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Overrated but well worth seeing
New review posted 28/9/13:

***LOTS OF SPOILERS***

Three Colours Blue (1993)
It was more enjoyable than I expected. The pace was quick. It started with arty close ups on details - I found that to be slightly off-putting. Then about four minutes into the movie, when Juliette Binoche tries to take the pills, it became properly dramatic and...
Published on 8 Dec. 2006 by BS on parade


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43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb package - cinema to treasure, 28 Mar. 2005
By 
Budge Burgess (Troon, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Three Colours Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
In his "Three Colours" trilogy, Kieslowski takes a handful of people whose destinies are irretrievably welded together as an expression of liberty, equality, and fraternity, and presents their lives and the decisions which have led them to come together.
The trilogy is a wonderful piece of art. Relating the three colours of the French flag to the mantra of the French Revolution (liberty, equality, fraternity), Kieslowski explores these virtues not as ideals or as morals to be evoked in each of the films, but as values which have largely been swept aside by modern consumerism and the pursuit of self-satisfaction and self-indulgence.
Kieslowski used a different cameraman for each film, used different thematic colours for each (different filters, different colours featuring heavily in each film ,etc.), and constructs three films which have radically different moods and feels to them. (Please see my individual reviews for greater detail.)
Juliette Binoche dominates "Blue", totally, in an acting tour de force which sweeps you off your seat. Zbigniew Zamachowski gives a witty performance in "White" (the weakest of the trilogy), with Julie Delpy playing a supporting role. And in "Red", the honours are shared between Irene Jacob and Jean-Louis Trentignant. Kieslowski can thus change the internal dynamics of the film to suit his needs - he nowhere relies on conventional male/female leads. Rather he deconstructs the relationships of his leading actors and uses these to emphasise the themes of each film.
It was a brave move to shoot all three films so quickly (they overlapped in shooting) and in pursuit of such a tight schedule. Though the characters are ultimately linked, and incidentally cross one another's paths beforehand, Kieslowski does not attempt to create a single character or group whose story we can follow across the three films. The unity is in the thematic link.
The trilogy works because of the quality of the ensemble Kieslowski uses. Acting, photography, lighting, editing, and direction are superb, although so very different across the three parts. The stories are enigmatically scripted - "White" is, as a film, possibly the weakest of the three, but its storyline is perhaps the one which most intrigues you, the one which is most likely to have you playing 'what happens next?'
This is cerebral cinema at its very best. This is cinema which can cross cultures and explore universal themes. This is liberating cinema, cinema you can sit back and think abut at length. The themes are painted before you, but you are equal to the director and actors in your ability to read into them your own understanding. And it's an understanding you can enjoy, but which is best shared in discussion with others: these are films to be watched together with friends and loved ones ... then argued about late into the next day over a few beers or glasses of wine. This is cinema to treasure.
The three DVD's in the trilogy are each supplemented by extras in the form of master classes by Kieslowski and interviews with the leading actresses - curiously Julie Delpy, not Zbigniew Zamachowski, is given prominence in "White". And the package contains a fourth DVD, "I'm So-So" - a long interview with Kieslowski in which we can see his interplay with his ensemble of cameramen and technicians. Overall, a superb package which no cinema buff should miss.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Three Colours of Brilliance, 23 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: The Three Colours Trilogy [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
What's there to say in regards to the Three Colours Trilogy that hasn't been said before. Over the last twenty odd years critics, film scholers and audiences have disected pretty much every shot of these three sensational films.

Despite its themes of liberty, equality, brotherhood & destiny; its the basic necessities of the films that should make a film worth watching, and fortunately the great, and sadly late, Krzysztof Kieślowski, has taken each film and given a hand crafted collage of cinematic beauty, and emotion.

Blue deals in tragedy and reaching a sense of liberty through the duldrums of said tragedy. Julliette Binoche plays Julie a survivor, who tries to mourn the death of her daughter and husband, and instead decides to breakaway from everything which she held dear from her married life and start afresh. It is only through the journey of her liberation and the discovery of facts from her previous life that finally allows her character to be free, and mourn. The film is both a visual and narrative treat, Slawomir Idziak's cinematography is lush with beauty that constantly refers to its title. The blue and dark filters is brilliantly used to convery the sense of Julie's character. Binoche gives a powerhouse performance, easily the best of her career. Her interactions with the world and her spontaneity drags the audience with her on her journey of liberation. A beautiful and thought provoking film and my own personal favourite of the trilogy.

White: My own personal second favourite doesn't have the compelling nature and power of its predecessor, but like all great 'sequels', if its a tad different, then its mostly always a treat, and while White is different than Blue, it is no less inferior, its simply different. Dealing with themes of equality, the film is a darkly comedic tale of a down on his luck Polish immigrant, Karol, who is dumped by his French wife, Dominique, and left to rot on the streets of Paris. Only when he meets a fellow Pole, Mikołaj, and gets back to Poland (in a very hillarious way) does his luck begin to change. I find it hard to this day why some have chosen White to be the worst of the trilogy. Sure it gets kudos when mentioned, but the film clearly deserves a better reputation then it has received. Another factor I champion in this entry is the overtly political tone, the majority of White is set in 90s Warsaw, when Poland was still letting go of its socialistic soul and on the brink of becoming a free market economy, with Karol representing the shift in the political and economic structure by starting off as a sweet natured man, only for him to become a cool, ruthless and vengeful capitalist. The film is superb viewing, with sensational performances from both Zbigniew Zamachowski as Karol and Janusz Gajos (who gives the best performance of the film) as Mikołaj

And now we come to Red, claimed by many to be the best in the trilogy, but for me its the weakest entry. A masterpiece it is, but its no where near as good as the previous two entries. This time dealing with themes of brotherhood and destiny, Red tells the story of a young, naive and heartfelt model, and a bitter reclusive retired judge who form a touching and beautiful friendship. The film is certainly far more uplifting and less cynical than the previous two entries (although it doesn't have any of the dark comedy of White) And even though its great that this film again goes on a different route than the others; it just doesn't have the same impact like the previous entries; and, I think, its all down to one element, and that's Irene Jacob. Jacob's performance in Red is very similar to her last collaboration with Kieslowski, the slow and overrated The Double Life of Veronique. Jacob is simply too sweet and whilst her wide eyed innocence and naivety may seem beautiful, it does become saccharine and becomes infuriating. However Jacob receives strong support from Jean Louis Trintignant who is phenomenal as the bitter judge who finds happiness and closure through his freindship with Jacob's model. Where the film scores very well is in its themes of destiny, as told by the film's sub plot involving a law gradudate and his romantic relationship.

Ever since its release two decades ago, Kiewslowski's Three Colours Trilogy have left a mark on the history of cinema and has provided more debate amongst critics, film fans and even dinner party guests (who try and impress their peers) then some. Even though its undeniable to avoid the themes and tones the films convey, its great to just simply sit back and revel in the craftsmanship, writing and performances of these three wonderful movies.

One for the ages, and one to proudly own.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Life-Altering, 4 Mar. 2014
This review is from: Three Colours Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
There aren't many films out there that can claim to be genuinely life-changing, but these films, I would argue, have earned that right. Made around the three French ideals; liberty, equality, fraternity, they are the pinnacle of film-making, a distinguished and mature work that form a cohesive and coherent whole, or can simply be enjoyed separately.

Three Colours Blue: my personal favourite of the trio, this is a film that sucks you in from the very first frame, and has such a high command of the core aspects of film-making (the unity of space, action and music, for example) that it makes all other films seem dull by comparison for several days afterwards. It tells a simple story; Julie Vignon is in a car with her young child and husband, who is a famous composer, and then the car crashes. The child and husband die. Julie is at first sad, and then we don't know how she is, and then we follow her for the rest of the film as, presumably, she doesn't know how she is either. This is where the theme of "liberty" comes in, as we learn slowly that she is trying to "free" herself from the shackles of the past through abandoning her old life. That's my take on it anyway, and even Kieslowski would admit that it is probably not that simple. Nevertheless, the film remains a singularly devastating and beautifully luminous experience that has images and sequences that are simply unforgettable.

Three Colours White: the underdog of the trilogy, and the least lauded, I retain a soft-spot for this film because it takes a potentially un-watchable scenario (that an impotent man's wife suddenly abandons him, has his shop burnt down by said wife, and then has to smuggle himself back to his native Poland and tells it with a dry, cynical humour that ends up carrying the film. Kieslowski's eye for the transcendental moments of life are still here though; watch in particular for the scene with the gun, and the sign-language scene at the end, which remain arguably my favourite singular moments of the trilogy. It is a comedy, yes, but the laughs are earned through the optimism of the central character, and thus the film sidesteps the fact that it could have been bleak as hell, and despite the fact that it is bleak in places, it is finally redemptive and uplifting.

Three Colours Red: the grand finale to the trilogy, this film concerns itself with a young model who finds an injured dog in the road, and takes it to its owner, a judge, who greets it with indifference. The film then goes on from there and plays with the ideas of fate, time, and what it means to live a "worthwhile" life. It's arguably the heaviest of the trilogy, but once more it is alive with the spirit of true film-making, moral objectivity, and a refusal to judge the characters. This is an image best symbolized in the image of the lonely judge, who has wired several phones in his area and seems to be playing God; a statement on the nature of film directors, God himself, and all manner of things, no doubt, and an image that Kieslowski himself probably eschews. There is always the sense that his characters are people, and not just machines for plot. Anyway. The finale alone is one of the most beautiful pieces of film-making you are likely to see.

All three films share performances that never feel like performances, and are shot with a breathtaking clarity that is peerless in modern cinema. See this films, and they will change your perception of film and what it is capable of. They are to be cherished.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply superb, 21 May 2004
This review is from: Three Colours Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
These 3 films are one of the most significant events in the history of cinema. Having said that, I don't feel they deal with themes which are beyond the understanding of mere mortals like me and you. They are like some of Beethoven's greatest music: it's simple but unfathomably great.
My personal favourite is "White." The male lead embodies the pathos of his situation perfectly, and, while he goes on to overcome his personal difficulties in dramatic fashion, and to take revenge on what he sees as his wife's cruelty, he comes to realise that he has gained nothing of lasting value. The closing scene is one of the most genuinely moving moments I have ever seen.
The glorious "Blue" quickly dispenses with the preliminaries; the central character's composer husband is killed in a car accident, and his wife eventually finds peace and redemption through a chance hearing of a street musician, apparently playing one of her late husband's themes, even though the music had never been published. She goes on to work on her husband's unfinished compositions, and the film reminds us of the universality of human suffering and the potential for human unity.
Like I said, these aren't new or even original themes, but this trilogy treats them with a cinematic beauty and a profound insight into the workings of the mind which has never been equalled.
If you want to spend some time with your television, you couldn't ask for a more worthwhile way of doing it.
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27 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'm so-so, 12 July 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Three Colours Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
The real value of buying this set if you already own the Three Colours films on DVD is the inclusion of the documentary 'I'm so-so' on the fourth disc. It is a wonderful film and reveals Kieslowski in a way that his written autobiography does not (or it acheives something sufficiently different to make it worthwhile). We all know that the Three Colours films are high points of 1990s European cinema so there isn't too much to say there. The extras on each disc are exactly the same as Artificial Eye's previous DVD releases so if you already have them you have to make the financial decision to outlay more money on the set. It goes without saying that if you are new to these films then you should buy the set immediately. But also consider the director's earlier 'Dekalog' which, for my money, is his best output - the Polish films win every time.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Subtitle fault on Red, 22 July 2009
By 
Alan Tucker (Stroud, Gloucestershire Great Britain) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Three Colours Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
There is currently an English subtitle fault on the RED disc of the 4 disc set. The subtitles only come up if you go to Chapters and play from that. We returned three sets before working this out. The 4th disc has a subtitle option and is no trouble. The 3 films are magnificent, worth the nuisance.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An immense film-making achievement, 23 Mar. 2005
By 
This review is from: Three Colours Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
Krzysztof Kieslowski's Three Colours Trilogy -- Blue, White and Red -- represents a masterful interpretation of the ideals of the French Revolution and modern French society, Liberty, Equality and Fraternity (as represented by the colours of the French flag).
Rather than being politically idealistic, Kieslowski's understandings of these ideals are deeply rooted in the realities of everyday life. In Blue, he sees liberty as young widow's gradual emergence from the grief of the death of her husband. The equality he portrays in White is the way in which the lives of all people are defined by circumstances and forces -- both internal and external -- beyond their control, and what he evidently sees as peoples' impotence in the face of these forces. In Red, fraternity is represented in terms of the invisible ties that link the lives of strangers, and the ways that people can influence each other, directly and indirectly, for better or for worse, without necessarily realising it.
In style, the three movies are very different: Blue is a quiet, profound, observational portrayal of a chapter in one woman's life; White is a dark and subtly subversive comedy; and Red the most straightforwardly dramatic in its structure. All are also movies of many levels, with numerous sub-themes running through the main stories, all as relevant and telling as the main story itself. Throughout the three movies, it seems that no frame is wasted, no movement or gesture without particular meaning and significance, even if the meaning is not immediately apparent. There are also significant themes running through the trilogy as a whole, making it worthwhile for new viewers to make an effort to see them together and in order.
In all three, Kieslowski draws stunning performances from his lead actors, Juliette Binoche in Blue, Zbigniew Zamachowski (a little-known Polish actor) in White, and the unique Irene Jacob in Red. The supporting actors, particularly Julie Delpy in White and Jean-Louis Trintignant in Red, are also brilliant. All clearly appreciate Kieslowski's vision of the trilogy as a whole, and are willing to be part of a greater whole, rather than demanding to be the main charecter.
The final scene of Red, the last of the three movies, has been criticised for bringing the key charecters of the three movies together for no apparent or particular reason. The sense seems to be that, by suddenly putting these charecters together in the same place and at the same time, Kieslowski creates a coincidence that is out of keeping with the deep realism of the films.
This is, however, to miss the point. In fact, this ending -- which encapsulates the main themes of the trilogy as a whole, particularly in its representations of suffering and hope -- should be seen as the starting point of the whole trilogy. What Kieslowski has done, in the three films, is to examine the lives (the back-stories, if you like) of the few very different people who, purely by chance, find themselves in the same place at the same very particular moment of time.
The whole point is that these are ordinary people, total strangers to each other; they could be anybody. And from the lives to these random, ordinary people, Kieslowski fashions a portrayal of the human condition that is perhaps unparalled in modern cinema.
The Three Colours Trilogy is a truly immense film-making achievement, a remarkable example of the possibilities of the medium.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not optimised for widescreen, 9 Aug. 2010
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This review is from: Three Colours Trilogy [DVD] (DVD)
These are some of my favourite movies of all time, so I was very disappointed to find that the DVD is mastered for 4:3 TV (not anamorphic), and with a strange half-way zoom which means you can't even use the linear zoom to fill the entire width of the screen without losing detail or the subtitles. Why they have cut off material on the sides when the original film is shot in 1:1.85 is beyond me!

You may want to wait for a Blu-ray release.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Three Colors (Trilogy)" on BLU RAY - Compatibility Issues For UK Buyers With The ‘US’ Release…, 1 Mar. 2014
By 
Mark Barry "Mark Barry" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Three Colours Trilogy [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
As you've probably gathered most of the reviews are for the 'DVD' version of this 1990’s trio of Art House gems starring Juliette Binoche. And the 'BLU RAY' variant of it has long been available in the States and several other territories. But which BLU RAY issue do you buy if you live in Blighty?

Unfortunately the uber-desirable USA Criterion release (simply called “Three Colors”) is REGION-A LOCKED - although it doesn't say so on Amazon. So it WILL NOT PLAY on most UK BLU RAY players unless they're chipped to play 'all' regions (which the vast majority aren't). Don’t confuse BLU RAY players that have multi-region capability on the 'DVD' front – that won’t help.

Luckily the Artificial Eye release (“Three Colours Trilogy”) is REGION B - so that will play the trio of “Blue”, “White” and “Red” (the three colours of the French flag) on UK machines - and it uses the same much-praised restored elements.

So check your player’s region coding acceptability if you want the pricier Criterion release...if not opt for the UK released BLU RAY at a far healthier price…
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wow!, 13 May 2004
By 
Mr. D. P. Goodfellow "Funkydan" (South east UK) - See all my reviews
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This boxed set contains all three parts of Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski's Three Colors Trilogy, RED, WHITE, and BLUE, which represent the three colors of the French flag and the French national motto. The films also represent the great Kieslowski's last as a director forming a trilogy which will stand forever as one of cinema's most profound achievements. With an overwhelming selection of extras for each film, this collection of films is value for money at its best!
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The Three Colours Trilogy [Blu-ray]
The Three Colours Trilogy [Blu-ray] by Krzysztof Kieslowski (Blu-ray - 2011)
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