Customer Reviews


2,538 Reviews
5 star:
 (1,748)
4 star:
 (406)
3 star:
 (224)
2 star:
 (103)
1 star:
 (57)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brutal and utterly relentless
"Mockingjay" is the final instalment of the Hunger Games trilogy and represents a far darker and bleaker view than the earlier two novels. Although ostensibly still aimed at the Young Adult market it's almost as if Suzanne Collins has decided that the story needs to grow up at a similar rate to her prospective readers. So you can consider yourself fully warned; don't...
Published 22 months ago by Ian Kirkpatrick

versus
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the ending I was hoping for...
I gave the first two books 5* as I genuinely felt they were both truly amazing. Sadly I can't say the same for the final book of this trilogy. Towards the end of the book it felt VERY rushed and there were plenty of open-ended 'scenes' which I felt could have been handled better. It's such a shame because it could have been something great but sadly it feels quite...
Published 21 months ago by Shortiee31


‹ Previous | 1 2254 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brutal and utterly relentless, 7 Jun 2012
By 
"Mockingjay" is the final instalment of the Hunger Games trilogy and represents a far darker and bleaker view than the earlier two novels. Although ostensibly still aimed at the Young Adult market it's almost as if Suzanne Collins has decided that the story needs to grow up at a similar rate to her prospective readers. So you can consider yourself fully warned; don't expect a light hearted conclusion to the trilogy.

I have thoroughly enjoyed reading all three novels although I am far removed from the target demographic. I found Collins to be a master-storyteller (no gender-based puns intended or required) and remarkably even-handed, irrespective of whether it's a main character or a member of the minor supporting cast who is being killed off. The truth is that very few survive, but that will come as no surprise to readers familiar with the gritty realism that Collins employs.

I felt that her skill at characterisation improved considerably from the first book and I felt a real sense of identification with the problems and difficulties that the main characters experience. Katniss's descent into depression and lethargy is particularly well-written and heartbreakingly accurate.

For me the epilogue felt a little unnecessary and I wondered why Collins felt the need to write it. I must try to do some research on-line to see if anyone has asked her this question. I suppose that after the machinations of the fairly convoluted plot had played out perhaps she saw it as a simpler, cleaner ending. But to me the conclusion of the book felt somewhat rushed after such careful plotting to reach this point.

However to sum up this third and final novel is harsh, brutal, and utterly relentless.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved it!! 5 stars all the way!, 29 Nov 2011
I have to side with all the five-star reviewers!

I enjoyed reading this SO much! I thought that the characters, who we have learnt to love in the previous books, developed new layers to their personality - Peeta in particular! A lot of other reviews have suggested that Katniss is unlikable and that she becomes weak and 'whiney', but I found her one of the most relatable characters BECAUSE of her flaws. Her reactions to the trauma that she suffers makes this one of the most gut-wrenching books I've read.

I think that the source of a lot of disappointment for the other more negative reviews is that this story has a non-conventional ending. I think the ending may have alienated a lot of people as it's not a stereotypically 'happy ending' but, personally, I found this a fantastic thing! With other series of books I've read, notably Harry Potter, although I loved them, I found myself asking just how much of a happy ending there could be for the main characters when so many bad things have happened in their lives. I loved the bittersweet ending of Mockingjay, where we see a world still affected by the traumatic events of the past.

I think that in comparison to a lot of (dare I use the phrase) 'Young adult' fiction that shows a dull love triangle, this book shows that no matter what happens, there is always hope and I found this to be a refreshing message. This book won't be everyone's cup of tea but I would encourage everyone to read this book - but maybe ask them to forget about the conventional ending that they were probably expecting.

There are flaws in this book, don't get me wrong, but I would challenge anyone to find a perfect book. For me, I review a book depending on whether I felt anything for the characters and whether I would read it again. By those criteria, it deserves every one of those 5 stars.

I hope that this has been helpful in some way!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'm speechless., 1 Sep 2010
By 
Dwayne @ Girls Without a Bookshelf (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
So, Mockingjay. I'm not going to lie - I am addicted, obsessed and completely loyal to this trilogy, so my review is reflective of that - but even so let me tell you, this book did not exactly bring me joy. It evokes a lot of emotions, yes but I was crying not smiling at the end of it.

Mockingjay stays true to its dystopian origins. While a lot will not agree with me, I feel that the grimness of the book is a part of its strength. In true dystopian fashion, it explores the downfall of human conscience and displays the worse of our attributes; like Hunger Games and Catching Fire, I was appalled by many of the events in the book and at points felt sick at the ability of the characters to act as cruelly as they do. At times I felt that Mockingjay borders on unbearable - exactly how grim can a book be? It seems that nothing close to happily ever after can be associated with this book, because believe me, it can be depressing.

I can't help but comment on all the political implications on this book, because the trilogy is far beyond just Katniss' story. The workings of the rebellion and the fight for freedom takes a bulk of the book and the tension spirals out of control in many of its pages.As the mockingjay, Katniss traverses the thin line that divides both sides. I love the twisted, wicked feel of the battle because that was exactly how I imagined it to be. Not only full of secrets, but full of dark aims and uncertainties.

There is a lot I can say about how the characters' fates are sealed. We know beforehand that there will be deaths; what we do not know is who will die. Or exactly how many. As it turns out, no number of speculations could possibly have prepared me for the depressing turn of events in Mockingjay. Unfair will not even begin to cover what I think, because really I felt as if the characters were oppressed. Their circumstances were too heavy to comprehend experiencing, and the book does not give them what happiness they were due. The strength of characters is evident here, as clearly as their weaknesses. At this point, we readers are already very attached to the characters, so extreme reactions are expected. When I found out exactly who dies, I literally screamed and cried and wished the words changed. It was not supposed to happen, that was my primary reaction. There was a sense of hopelessness and helplessness and surely, you have got to be kidding? I felt as if I was killed right along with the character(s).

It was even more painful to read about the fates of those who were indirectly responsible for those deaths. And while I was not happy with the decisions of some of the major characters, I can understand the rationale behind it. It was not easy to pretend to be in their shoes and emphatise, but to comprehend the depth of pain and grief is, and that understanding is what makes it seem like a true decision. Depressing, but I felt that the portrayal of the damages to the human persona is not only accurate but also vivid, I believe Mockingjay stays true to its origins.

The ending I felt is slightly too rushed for my liking and too much too short. I am not sure I approve with what happened to some of the major characters, because towards the end I felt the need to know more about how they fared. I needed details, further insights and I don't think that was exactly granted. The ending is open to interpretations and leaves a lot to the reader to ponder and imagine. It is not happy per se, but as close to happiness as a dystopian trilogy like this one can be. I'm going to go ahead and say that the ending be-fits the feel of the trilogy. Had it been a flowery happy ever after, I would have much disliked it, because then it would appear as if it was only made to please the readers. It's not the best possible ending, but I can envision it happening following the events of Mockingjay. So it is a neat ending I guess. Still, I needed more!

I'm sure Mockingjay is part evil - it gave me such a terrible case of withdrawal once I finished that I did not know what to say or do - and that was on top of all the other emotions the events in the book evoked! There was a sense of 'now what?' that hovered over me when it was over, and I was emotionally-drained. Which means it's a good book, a great trilogy and a worthy read. Which means I am still hooked to it, and will probably always be. Which means Katniss' story is unmissable. Prepare to scream, kick and cry with this final book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the ending I was hoping for..., 9 July 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy) (Kindle Edition)
I gave the first two books 5* as I genuinely felt they were both truly amazing. Sadly I can't say the same for the final book of this trilogy. Towards the end of the book it felt VERY rushed and there were plenty of open-ended 'scenes' which I felt could have been handled better. It's such a shame because it could have been something great but sadly it feels quite incomplete.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Painful to finish, 2 July 2013
By 
Haleemah (London, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy) (Kindle Edition)
I read book 1 and 2 of the Hunger Games and loved them. I reach book 3 however and have a breakdown. I cried my eyes out. I hated the loss of wonderful characters like Cinna (book 2), Finnick and Prim. There was no need to just kill off characters like that. I occasionaly would wait for a dramatic comeback from one of these but no such luck. In fact I was so sure that every character was going to die that I just kept waiting for Gale or Peeta to get shot.
And then there's Katniss's love life. What a disapoint. I was so sure her and Gale were going to get together and I was constantly waiting for that moment in the book. The way that the author makes Gale into a main character made me feel that he would become the chosen partner. And his send off from the book!!! Oh my goodness, he just gets dismissed to another distrist and that was it. Bye bye Gale!! I was expecting some kind of romantic send off between him and Katniss.

Peeta I just find confusing. In a way I wish that he didn't exist and that Katniss and Gale have to work through the Hunger Games and war.

I'm the sort of person who loves a good romantic/happy ending type of book. OK some people die when a little drama is needed but not all the time!! If you're the sort of reader who likes tearful, depressing drama with a terrible love triangle then this is the book for you. Not that I didn't love 1 and 2 but when it comes to books it's the ending that counts. And this ending was totally not satisfying. (So dissatisfying in fact, that I had to write this review straight I finished the book at 2.30 in the morning)
Oh and one more thing. The way Katiss doesn't call her children by their names is rather sickening. In her eyes they're 'The Boy' and 'The Girl'.
Just to conclude, the ending was terrible and needed more thought all together. Book 3 didn't live up to it's previous victors.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read!, 3 Mar 2012
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy) (Kindle Edition)
This book starts one month after the last one finishes. Katniss is displaced. Her home is obliterated. The few survivors of her district are now refugees somewhere that they believed no longer existed. Their new home is regimented, strict and confining .... Something that her very nature rebels against.
Her head is still reeling with the impact of recent events. Her concussion makes focus difficult. However she hates the regime that now tries to rule her life and ......

Is tortured by the fact that Peeta is now a hostage of the Capitol (spelt correctly, with an O not an A). She knows the horror, the inhuman cruelty that those in power are capable of and Peeta is now in their hands! Katniss is still unclear how deep her feelings are for Peeta, is still confused by his and Gale's love ...... but she is tormented with thoughts of what Peeta must be going through.
The rebel leader, Coin, is as ruthless and determined as Snow to grab and maintain power. Katniss is once more in demand. This time as a figure-head for the rebellion she unwittingly incited with her single act of rebellion, in her first foray into the arena.

Once more Katniss is in an arena ...... only this time the arena is the war being fought against the Capitol. Once more she is frightened by the threats against loved ones. Tortured by their pain. Once more she must choose allies from people that she doesn't trust.

The book builds steadily in tempo until the action becomes non stop and enthralling. Terrifying creatures are once again launched onto the unsuspecting. It seems that the people in power will do anything, no matter how cruel, to keep a grip on the nation that they rule.

The characters we have grown to love are forced to make difficult decisions. Question right from wrong. Does the end justify the means? What is an act of war and what is an act of cruelty? What decides whether mercy is kindness or foolishness?

The decisions drive Gale and Katniss apart. The two men who once claimed to love her, seem to now bear her at best indifference, at worse, hatred. Trust is a fragile, tenuous thing when people keep breaking it.

The violence escalates with the war and characters are lost that may shock and upset readers. However, the fact that not everyone survives made the story more realistic for me. I did guess who Katniss would kill, who would be her last kill. However, this did not spoil the story for me.
This has been a wonderful series to read and I would heartily recommend it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


131 of 161 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Satsfaction = Zero, 7 April 2012
OK. This is how I rate the series. Book 1 = 5 stars. Book 2 = 5 stars. Book 3, first half = 5 stars. Book 3, second half = 1 star.

Maybe that's being a bit unfair about the second half of Mockingjay, because without a doubt it was well written, but the faults to me were so enormous that I couldn't get past them.
Suzanne Collins is an incredibly talented author, with an amazing imagination and insight, but she struggles with building any kind of romantic connection or the development of a relationship.

THE FAULTS (***** Spoilers from here *****)

Finnick's Story:
Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. His character is developed beautifully. We go from abject dislike through to adoration. A masterclass in developing a character. What drives Finnick is unveiled to us bit by marvellous bit, to reveal a complex character, strong, yet abused and vulnerable who you have to admire. His love story with Annie is one of the highlights of the book for me even though their relationship was hardly touched on. I WANTED him to have his happy ending. Then what happens? The author simply throws him away. Gone. Dead in a couple of sentences without a backward glance. To me it was one of the oddest deaths in any book I've ever read. After all that, Finnick's death was just a plot device to rack up the sense of danger. Nobody's safe! Nobody's safe! It was totally and utterly unnecessary. We already knew that nobody was safe. What a total waste of a good character. Rule Number 1. Leave your readers satisfied. That was one of the most unsatisfactory moments in any book I've ever read. It would have cost the plotline and the energy of the book nothing to leave him intact to go off into the sunset with Annie at the end. All it achieved was a lot of dissatisfied readers. A huge emotional let down.

The Mission to kill Snow:
Rule Number 2. If you are going to start something finish it.
What a mish mash this was. Really it was during this part of the book I started to wonder if the author had forgotten everything she knew about good storytelling. I can't speak for the author, but I think I see what she was trying to do. Rack it up, rack it up, Finnick's death, chaos, Gale's capture, rack it up, rack it up, Prim's death, and BANG! Katniss blows up and enters some kind of La-La land of Weirdness.
Except it just doesn't work. It feels more like the author abandons the mission half way through because really, she just can't be bothered.
Conveniently when Katniss returns from La-La Land the war is over. Unfortunately the Weirdness isn't.
It's a massive anti-climax.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Overload:
Yes, we all know people get it. Yes, we want our books to feel real. But we don't want them to be TOO real. That's why we loll around the house reading instead of having a proper life. There's nothing interesting about someone who spends weeks in solitary confinement or hiding in a cupboard.
I know that's the real reaction, but I just don't want it happening to the lead character in an action story. The lead characters in action stories pick themselves up and get on with it. That's what they're there for. To carry the story. I think Katniss gave up right about the same time the author did.

Gale? Gale? Where for art thou Gale?:
OK. So you start a story. Girl meets boy. Now, I'm not a fan of formulas and rules, but there are some things that always work and some things that will always fail.
Rule Number 3: If you are going to start a story with girl meets boy just make sure you don't half heartedly abandon the boy half way through the story. And for god's sake don't have her end up with somebody else unless the boy at the start was evil incarnate. If Suzanne knew that Katniss was going to end up with Peeta, she might have started the 1st book with the bread story, and she shouldn't have invested so heavily in Gale. Remember we want to feel satisfied at the end of a book, or we might leap to the computer and hammer out all our frustrations by writing horrible reviews on Amazon.
All through book 3 I'm waiting patiently for THAT moment with Gale. Only it never comes, even though I'm very very very patient. In fact Gale disappears without so much as a goodbye, never to be seen again. We hear he's off doing stuff in Sector 2, and has apparently just forgotten the great love of his life even though she is now a bit doolally. Is it me?

The End:
I could write a whole separate review about the character arc that is Peeta but frankly; I can't be bothered, so I'll skip to the end which is kind of what every section of this whole book seemed to do.
There are two things that the author really ought to work on.
1) How to end a story so that all the ends tie up and there's a certain level of satisfaction.
2) The development of an emotional attachment between two characters.
Both were so wholly absent in this book that it spoiled the whole trilogy for me.
Maybe she was trying to show that they were so damaged in the end that they couldn't connect to each other or even to their own children.
I have never in my life referred to my daughter as "The girl" or my son as "The boy". Never. It shows a level of detachment that is a wee bit scary.
Surely after 15 years, she's left the Weirdness behind to the point where she can give her kids proper names.
And her relationship with Peeta at the end? What relationship? If they developed one I didn't see it.

The Agenda:
If you have an anti-war agenda that's fine and dandy with me. Suzanne Collins had three books worth of space to hammer home all the dangers of a future Orwellian type state and the horrors of war. Just don't let your agenda obliterate what people ultimately buy books for, which is a good story. I don't buy novels to told how to think. There's a kind of irony there.

A weary attempt at satisfying a publishing deadline rather than any actual readers. The most unsatisfactory ending that I've ever read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hunger games- mockingjay, 17 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the third book in the hunger games trilogy so don't read this book first or you will not understand the book. I think catching fire is the best on in this trilogy but this book is brilliant. At the end of this book I was crying I will not tell you why because I will spoil the book I would recommend it to people 10+. Thank you for reading
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb written, dark, but brilliant message!, 17 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I absolutely loved the way this book was written after initial hate of remembering some events.
There is not novelty in the first book, especially if you are born in East Europe, or have knowledge of world wide history, but once the main characters are taken from the district they belong to, the story begin to unfold in a unique way.

The author was clever to turn those painful events that at some point did happen in the world, mix, them, create a world of horror that made most of the readers commenting, but by doing so she painted a canvas in front of us where the message is clear Hope, no matter what.

If you wonder what I m talking about, think of Gladiators, Nazis camps, Serbia, Yugoslavia, Romania....

I absolutely hated the book to start with, but as I read more and more, I applauded the author, and enjoyed reading it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great ending to a great trilogy, 4 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the most effective ending I have ever read In a book before so powerful and touching I nearly cried
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2254 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xa99c9594)

This product

Mockingjay (Hunger Games Trilogy)
3.23
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews