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63 of 69 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars From Here to Eternity...
On paper, C.S Lewis' third Narnia novel is easily the most film friendly - with fire-breathing dragons, monstrous sea serpents, battles with slave traders, and magical islands aplenty, the prospect of seeing this story brought to the big screen is a mouth-watering one indeed. For the most part then the movie treatment of `Dawn Treader' is a resounding success: Simon...
Published on 31 Dec 2010 by Scaroth, Last of the Jagaroth

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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Why Change the Story?
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader was the first Narnian book I read as a child and my favourite. It is such a wonderful story. That small, beautiful ship, going from island to island and adventure to adventure, to track down the fate of the seven lords out into the unknown towards Aslan's country. So what on earth was the Green Mist, the seven swords and the extra...
Published on 14 Aug 2011 by SPJ


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63 of 69 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars From Here to Eternity..., 31 Dec 2010
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On paper, C.S Lewis' third Narnia novel is easily the most film friendly - with fire-breathing dragons, monstrous sea serpents, battles with slave traders, and magical islands aplenty, the prospect of seeing this story brought to the big screen is a mouth-watering one indeed. For the most part then the movie treatment of `Dawn Treader' is a resounding success: Simon Pegg's swashbuckling mouse Reepicheep is impressively realized and consistently good value, while newcomer Will Poulter is perfectly cast as odious schoolboy Eustace Scrubb. However, as with the two previous Narnia movies, the scriptwriters seem to have omitted small but key facets of the story and shoehorned in an excess of mawkishness - Eustace's extended sobbing at the loss of his `friend' Reep could surely have been ditched in favour of extending the screen time of the Dufflepuds - one of the best parts of the novel but woefully curtailed here.
Anyhow, these niggles aside, the film is tremendous fun and sumptuously shot - the titular ship looks fantastic, and the scene with the sea-serpent appropriately thrilling. The monster itself is pretty horrific, meaning that I would baulk at watching this with my six year old, but overall it's a family-friendly slice of fantasy that will undoubtedly bear repeated viewings for years to come.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Why Change the Story?, 14 Aug 2011
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader was the first Narnian book I read as a child and my favourite. It is such a wonderful story. That small, beautiful ship, going from island to island and adventure to adventure, to track down the fate of the seven lords out into the unknown towards Aslan's country. So what on earth was the Green Mist, the seven swords and the extra passengers all about? Why? It was all completely unnecessary. I've just gone back to re-read the book and the way CS Lewis tells the story is just fine. No embellishments are needed. For someone who doesn't know and love the original book, the changes won't matter that much - except that the Green Mist is never really explained. But knowing the story, they really irritated me!
I agree with another reviewer that it felt we were rushing from scene to scene, so a slightly longer, more leisurely paced film through the different adventures would have been a pleasure.
Will Poulter as Eustace did a difficult job well, changing from grumpy sulk to the promise of the hero-to-be in the Silver Chair.
I just hope that future films stay true to what CS Lewis wrote. He was a great story-teller and there is no need for any modern script-writer to "improve on" the original plots.
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent film...3D is ok, 29 July 2011
This review is from: The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Blu-ray 3D + Blu-ray + DVD + Digital Copy) (Blu-ray)
This 3D blu ray is currently only available through the brand-specific give-aways with certain tvs etc, however they can be sourced relatively easily. This review is of one of these give-aways, although I'm guessing any difference with the retail release will be minor.

The film itself is excellent. The canvas is broad and the effects are, in general, superb. There's a real sense of adventure and travel. The returning actors are excellent and the new addition, cousin Eustace, steals the show.

The 3D is variable. I understand why the director felt he had to opt for post-conversion to 3D but frankly shooting native 3D gives a sense of dimension and depth that no conversion I've seen yet has even comes close to. Compare a native 3D film like 'Ultimate Wave Tahiti' to this, and Dawn Treader suffers badly.

There's no doubt that the addition of 3D to Dawn Treader really adds to the experience and is more immersive, but the 3D could just have been SO MUCH BETTER if shot native.
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89 of 104 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vivid re-creation of C.S. Lewis's book, 12 Dec 2010
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Marshall Lord (Whitehaven, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review of the film was originally based on having taken my family to watch it in the cinema in 3D. We enjoyed the film and bought the DVD when it came out: it was also great fun to watch at home.

I found the first two "Chronicles of Narnia" films excellent, but had not expected this third film to live up to the same standard. However, it exceeded my expectations: if anything I enjoyed it even more than the first two films, The Chronicles Of Narnia - The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe [DVD] [2005] and The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (2 Disc Special Edition) [DVD] [2008].

No film pleases everyone, and I see from the other reviews that some people didn't enjoy this as much as my family did, so let me explain what I think was good about the film.

The original book, The Voyage of the "Dawn Treader" (Puffin Books), has one of the most memorable and amusing opening lines in children's fiction:

"There was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it."

No film or TV version of this book will work without a good actor playing Eustace. He has to be someone we can love to hate in the early part of the film, come to sympathise with as the story continues, and whose expressions and actions positively radiate the shock, horror and incredulity of a boy who had been raised to scoff at fairy tales and legends, but who finds out the hard way that they are real when he is transported into one.

The character is brought to life in this film by Will Poulter, whose elastic face displays brilliantly the shock or confusion most of us would feel if we suddenly found ourselves in a world where magic, dragons, and talking animals really existed.

Eustace is a cousin of the Pevensie children from the first two films. His cousins Lucy Pevensie (Georgie Henshaw) and Edmund Pevensie (Skandar Keynes) are staying with Eustace and his parents while their parents and elder siblings are away. Having overheard Edmund and Lucy talking about a land called Narnia, Eustace assumed that they were playing fantasy games. His reaction when the three of them are magically transported aboard the ship "Dawn Treader" is, of course, horrified disbelief. When Eustace asks where they are, and is told - by a minotaur, no less - that he is aboard "the finest ship in the Narnian navy" his reaction is almost worth watching the film for on its own.

The screenwriters had a real challenge to fit this book into two hours, and to be reasonably true to the spirit of the book while keeping the viewer in suspense. As with "Prince Caspian", they changed the order of events more than a little, and added to the storyline, though it usually got back onto roughly the same track in the end. Almost all the major events of the book, and most of my favourite details, eventually happened in the film, but not necessarily in the same order or quite the same way.

Several sections of the book had to be radically cut down to fit the time, though with the exception of the first adventure at the Lone Islands, this was mostly done in a way which did relatively little damage to the essence of the storyline. As in the book, the Dawn Treader encounters slavers at the Lone Islands. One of them is played in a cameo role by Douglas Gresham, stepson of C.S. Lewis, who was an executive producer on the film staff.

But the bold coup d'etat based on an inspired bluff which follows in the book, in which King Caspian (Ben Barnes) who is the nominal overlord of the Lone Islands makes his authority real by overthrowing Gumpas, the corrupt governor of the islands, did not make it into the film. This was one of comparatively few elements of the book which I was really disappointed not to see in the film.

The scriptwriters cut down on the number of occasions when the Dawn Treader drops anchor at yet another new island by combining more than one adventure on the same island which in the book took place at different ones, and by cutting out some of the uneventful stops in the book to take on food and water.

They also cut out a lot of the dialogue and detail of the events on both Coriakin's and Ramandu's islands - including, surprisingly, Ramandu himself. However, Coriakin (Bille Brown in one of the strongest performances of the film) has a slightly enhanced role. Ramandu's daughter, (Laura Brent) is still very much in the story, and she has been given the name Lilliandil, which was coined by Douglas Gresham. The Dufflepuds also appear in the film, though their part is rather cut down from the book.

I thought the essence of what happened on these islands in the book is dramatically and amusingly captured, but there will probably be quite a few fans of the books who will be disappointed not to see more of the Dufflepuds. And if you blink you'll miss the start of the love story between Caspian and Lilliandil.

At the same time, certain other things have been extended. The duel to which Eustace is challenged by Reepicheep the talking mouse actually takes place in this film, but is much more subtle than it could easily have been. Instead of just trying to get revenge on Eustace, Reepicheep (Simon Pegg) sets out to teach him how to fight with a sword: the scene is very funny but serves as a fore-runner of the unlikely friendship which was to develop between Reep and Eustace later in both the book and film.

The quest to find the seven missing Narnian lords is extended into a struggle to defeat an evil which is threatening to corrupt the whole world of Narnia, but the individual adventures of the story are slotted neatly into this plot with comparatively little damage to most of them - in fact, several of Lewis's original story segments fitted so well into the enlarged quest that one could almost imagine that they were meant to be part of that story.

The moral aspects and christian allegories of the book have been dialled down slightly, but not enough to offend any but the most fanatical C.S. Lewis purist. It would have wrecked the central themes of the story if these elements had been largely or entirely removed, but too much moralising would have stopped this from working as a family film. I think they got the balance about right.

Ben Barnes does an excellent reprise of his role as Caspian, the main change being that he's dropped the hispanic accent. Skandar Keynes brings real power to the role of Edmund, and Georgie Henshaw is absolutely magnificent as a teenage Lucy. So much so that it's a terrible shame they won't have an opportunity for another central role in any films of the remaining books, but I shall be watching their remaining careers with great interest.

However, if the series gets going again, I've little doubt that Barnes, Keyes and Henshaw will get some cameos, just as William Moseley and Anna Popplewell do in this one playing the elder Pevensie brother and sister, Peter and Susan, in scenes set on our world. Three of the Pevensie siblings - Edmund, Susan and Lucy - have important supporting roles in the book "The Horse and His Boy (Puffin Books)" so if a film of that book is made I hope and expect that Anna Popplewell, Skandar Keyes and Georgie Henshaw will appear in it. It's set towards the end of the Pevensie siblings' fifteen year reign as Kings and Queens of Narnia, so the fact that they will all have grown up by the time another film can be made will not be an issue. This is the book in which Edmund finally gets to command an army in battle as Commander in Chief - Peter being off dealing with a giant invasion on Narnia's northern border - and I would like to see what Skandar Keyes can make of this role.

Assuming the series does continue, it is unlikely that any of the actors who played the children who were the main characters in the first three films will have a major part in the next one. According to various sites on the internet, there are some legal and contract problems which will have to be dealt with before another film can be made.

If these can be resolved the plan is that number four will be the Narnian Creation story, "The Magician's Nephew," which takes place thousands of years earlier in Narnian time and links to the Victorian era on our own world, when the young Diggory Kirke, who grows up to be the Professor from "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe," was present at the dawn of Narnia.

It's just possible that the creators may be able to bookend a film version of "The Magician's Nephew" with Jim Broadbent as the adult Professor Kirke telling the Pevensey family, or Eustace, about his own adventure in Narnia as a boy, but otherwise the only common characters will be Aslan, (Liam Neeson) and Empress Jadis a.k.a. the White Witch (Tilda Swinson).

In "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader," apart from the lead characters, other excellent performances come from Liam Neeson as the voice of Aslan, and Simon Pegg, who takes over from Eddie Izzard as the voice of Reepicheep, leader of Narnia's talking mice. This is a difficult role to bring off because he has to be funny in places but also genuinely heroic.

If you've not read the books, imagine Reepicheep as a mouse version of Antonio Banderas's character from Shrek II to IV, and the eponymous "Puss In Boots [DVD]" except that the swordfighting cat voiced by Banderas is a comic character with a heroic aspect, while in "Prince Caspian" and "Voyage of the Dawn Treader" Reepicheep the swordfighting mouse is a heroic character with significant comic aspects.)

Izzard was very funny in this role in "Prince Caspian" - I particularly treasured the way he said "You people have no imagination!" as he skewered a Telmarine soldier who had just blurted out "You're a mouse!"

Pegg gets some similar lines in this one. However, in "Voyage of the Dawn Treader" the character of Reepicheep grows immensely, particularly in the way he befriends Eustace and helps him adjust to Narnia despite the two of them getting off to the worst possible start.

The screenwriters have mucked around a great deal with the details of the relationship between Reepicheep and Eustace, but the spirit of the friendship which develops between them in the book is depicted very well indeed. Partly this is down to good acting by both Pegg and Poulter, and partly the skill of the animators who depicted Reep the mouse and - Um. Better not give the story away for those who don't know it from the book, but let's just say that for quite a bit of the film Eustace is animated.

I also appreciated Gary Sweet's role as Drinian, captain of the Dawn Treader, and Bille Brown was very impressive as the magician Coriakin.

Like the first two "Chronicles of Narnia" films, the beginning of this one spends slightly longer in wartime England before the children are called into Narnia than in the book. This time it is Edmund who is struggling with some of the problems that all of the Pevensies would have faced on their return to our world and which Peter was finding difficult at the start of "Prince Caspian."

If you can imagine spending a decade or two in another world where you were a king, during which time you had grown to manhood, commanded armies, fought and won wars: and then you suddenly had to go back to being an ordinary teenager who the British army considers too young to enlist - it would be pretty infuriating, wouldn't it?

We're all used to fantastic special effects these days, but they were magnificent in this film. I gather much of it was filmed in the same facility used to create "Titanic" and "Master and Commander." From the Dawn Treader herself to mermaids, talking animals, a scary dragon and an even scarier sea serpent, all sorts of wonderful or magical things were made to look real.

This was the first time I watched a 3D film in the cinema, and it worked far better than I expected. 3D is not currently available on standard DVDs, but it is available on Blu-ray if you have the appropriate player.

My other comment about this film is that it was far and away the funniest of the three Chronicles of Narnia films to date. I laughed out loud at least half a dozen times while watching this one.

One nice touch to watch for in the closing credits: they are illustrated with Pauline Baynes' delightful pictures as drawn for the original book.

Depending on which version you get, DVD extras are reasonable to good: the two disc version includes a digital copy which can be loaded on a computer or ipod/iphone/ipad or console, four deleted scenes, director's commentary, and three music videos in which scenes from the film are interwoven with the artists who performed the background songs in the film.

Conclusion: broadly true to the spirit of the book, gripping and exciting, well worth watching. I do hope they manage to produce film versions of all four remaining Narnia books. At one stage there were plans to release "The Magician's Nephew" in December 2013 and I was really looking forward to it.

Sadly that is no longer on the cards, but since this film series has now generated gross income of over 1.5 billion dollars, making it the 20th highest-grossing film series of all time, there has to be a reasonable chance that someone will eventually manage to finish it. I do hope so.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An okay entry in the series..., 17 Oct 2013
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When the Voyage of the Dawn Treader was released, I was unsure how I would find it as the book is not one of my favourite entries of the series, mainly due to the lack of a central villain. Unfortunately, this entry is a step down after the last two movies, though the main characters are as good as ever and Will Poulter is a great addition to the cast. Thankfully with the problems apparently sorted out concerning the franchises future, my personal favourite of the series The Silver Chair should be on the horizon very soon.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Didn't make much of an impression, 12 Jun 2013
By 
Laura Hartley (London) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
The Narnia films have gone downhill since the original (The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe) was released, that is in plotline, commercially these films still do very well. The second film, Prince Caspian, was still a decent film, but nothing compared to The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe and unfortunately, The Dawn Treader is even worse. This film was produced by 20th Century Fox, instead of Disney, and perhaps the fall in revenue of the series is to blame for that. Now writing this post would be considered blasphemy in my school as we worship Anna Popplewell, who plays Susan, an ex-pupil, but since neither she nor William Moseley feature much at all in this movie, I think I'll get away with it.

This film focuses on the two younger Pevensie children, Lucy and Edmund, as well as a new additon: their cousin Eustace (played by Will Poulter). Will Poulter. He's probably the best thing about this movie as he is undoubtedly one of the best child actors today. He plays the role of annoying cousin Eustace so well, that I genuinely wanted to kick him for the majority of the movie (it's a good thing, don't worry). Something really puzzling about this movie is Prince Caspian. Now if i remember correctly, in the second film, he had a distinctly (sexy!) Spanish accent. WHERE DID IT GO? It is a mystery.

Unfortunately, I haven't read the book so I can't tell you whether or not the story sticks to the plotline or not, but if the books anything like the movie, I'm not going to bother. Don't get me wrong, there were some very good aspects to this movie, that were entertaining and emotional; however, there are others which leave much to be desired. Personally, I wouldn't watch it again, but since it was so commericially popular, and did receive some very good reviews, I guess this one's up to you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Setting sail for the end of the world, 28 Oct 2012
By 
Nat Whilk (Lincolnshire, UK) - See all my reviews
Some discs I love so much that I only ever watch them at Christmas. The Golden Compass [Blu-ray], Harry Potter Wizard's Collection Box Set (Blu-ray + DVD + UV Copy)[Region Free], The Lord of the Rings Trilogy, Extended Edition [Blu-ray] [2001] - and the Chronicles of Narnia.

In this third Chronicle, Lucy (Georgie Henley), Edmund (Skandar Keynes), Caspian (Ben Barnes) and the chivalrous Reepicheep (now voiced by Simon Pegg) return from the second film of the series, and are joined by a boy who is called Eustace Clarence Scrubb and almost deserves it (superbly portrayed by Will Poulter). Under the direction of Michael Apted, moving spirit of the famous 7 Up documentaries, they sail ever eastward on the magnificent Dawn Treader into adventures variously perilous, comical or awe-inspiring.

This Blu-ray trims the film's frame to 16X9, but otherwise serves its ravishing cinematography and exquisite CGI to glorious effect. David Arnold's music sings out as beautifully as one would hope.

Just as its predecessors did, the screenplay often departs from the narrative of the C. S. Lewis book upon which the film is based. Some characters and events are omitted, others are introduced and incidents are freely rearranged. But the heroes of the film remain recognizably the people that Lewis invented, they experience the same moral crises, they make the same choices and their journey comes to the same sublime conclusion. (And lovers of the book will surely rejoice to see the way in which the design of the film honours Pauline Baynes's lyrical illustrations.)

If, like me, you delight in what Douglas Gresham calls beauty fantasy, this is one Blu-ray that you simply mustn't miss.

(Incidentally, you may like to know that this film is also available in 3D - see The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Blu-ray 3D + Blu-ray)[Region A & B] - and that its two predecessors have been released in a convenient double pack (Chronicles Of Narnia - The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe/Prince Caspian [Blu-ray]).)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars DVD - Voyage of the Dawn Treader, 9 Oct 2012
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Found the DVD on offer, so bought it. I love the Narnia stories so bought this one to complete the set. Perhaps not as good as "The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe" but still enjoyable and thought provoking. Do read the books too!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great film, 10 Jun 2012
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This is a great family film you do not need to see the other two to understand what is going on highly recommended viewing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, 28 Dec 2011
By 
Mr. John Aldridge (Co. Mayo, Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Loved this! The scenery is spectacular and the special effects are excellent. There were just a couple of things left out from the book but mostly it was true to C.S. Lewis's story. I'm hoping that they will now make "The Silver Chair" - in fact, it would be great if they made movies of all 7 of The Chronicles of Narnia.
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