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4.8 out of 5 stars
Scapegoat
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on 16 June 2011
A brilliant book by one of the UK's foremost investigative journalists exploring the pernicious impact of disability hate crime: on disabled people, their families and society at large. The author travels to the scenes of some of the most serious and notorious hate crimes committed against disabled people, and talks to bereaved families and friends who are struggling to come to terms with the brutal, and often sadistic murder of a loved one. Police Officers involved in some of the cases describe them as the worst they've encountered. The fact that many of these crimes were committed in areas of high density housing where neighbours were apparently able to tune out the horrific violence going on next door is particularly troubling, and brought to mind Hannah Arendt's 'banality of evil' theory which contests that the great evils in history were not executed by fanatics or sociopaths, but rather by ordinary people. Has the hostility towards and baiting of disabled people has become so 'normalised' (as Edward S Herman has argued) that "ugly, degrading, murderous, and unspeakable acts become routine and are accepted as 'the way things are done'"?. Disturbingly, whilst nothing new, the scapegoating of disabled people for society's ills has intensified and become more brazen in recent years, especially on internet. Cries of "burdens to society", "drain on taxpayers" and "scroungers" eerily echo Nazi slogans used to condone the systematic murder of disabled adults and children during the Holocaust. Many of those persecuted, tortured and executed during the witch-hunt era we learn, were disabled or vulnerable, and to this day in some cultures disabled children continue to be labelled as witches. Thanks to this landmark book, disability hate crime is a problem that can no longer be ignored.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 24 June 2011
Although a lot of the stories were upsetting, I loved this book as it really tackled some of the issues surrounding disability hate crime that the criminal justice system seem to be ignoring or missing. It really showed how people are getting away with this crime and that the people who suffer from it suffer on a regular basis which the police fail to recognise. Sadly, I feel most disabled people withhin the UK will be able to relate to this book at some point in their life. The writer Katherine Quarmby looks at cases from across the UK and speaks to friends and families of the victims getting an in-depth account of the abuse suffered by many. It shows that some people's attitudes towards the disabled makes their life hell and that disabilism needs to be recognised in the same way that racism and homophobia is.
I do feel the book seemed to be largely focused on disability hate crime surrounding people with learning difficulties and failed to recognise disability hate crime surrounding other impairments such as people with physical impairments or sensory impairments.
I think this book is a must read for anybody interested in disability studies but also for anybody in general.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 28 September 2011
Tom Shakespeare is right. This may be truly the most important book you will read, but not only this year. It is one of the most relevant documents investigative journalism has ever produced. It is also a test of our social skills and your personal psyche too. For if this book won't leave you helpless and depressed, that means you are strong enough to join the ranks of those genuinely concerned about social justice and able to change something in the dysfunctional reality we live in. Equality-wise, we all live in a third world and democracy is only a baby that may grow up or not... It is all up to us, whether we decide to rare and nourish it or dump it in a well of indifference and complacency. This precious book can help the fragile child by providing us with hopefully therapeutic news of horrors that occur right next to the nursery.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 16 June 2011
A much needed and very welcome analysis of the appalling treatment- including murder- many disabled people still receive, in our society. Ms Quarmby first raised the issues in her report for the disability charity Scope- "Getting away with murder"- but this book brings it all home. Dominic Lawson in the Sunday Times has described this as a 'stomach-turning book- which must be read' and I'd fully agree with his excellent review. This is superbly written, well argued, and Quarmby's research is impeccable and unimpeachable. An absolutely ESSENTIAL read for anyone involved in disability issues and a worthwhile read for those of us who aren't - she shows how our attitudes to disability have been shaped by historical factors, and that disabled people still don't receive the same defence under the law as other minorities. Murder which involves racist or sexist attitudes is punishable as a 'hate crime' (and therefore the convicted get higher sentences) but murder which involves 'disablist' attitudes still doesn't- this must change. Katharine Quarmby is to be congratulated on bringing this issue to our attention, and Portobello books for publishing it. This is a very, very, important book- READ IT.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 2 November 2011
Scapegoat is a non-fiction book concerning attitudes towards people with disabilities and why we are failing them. Written by Katherine Quarmby; a `crusading' journalist, filmmaker and freelance writer who uses her book to study, analyse and hopefully enlighten and understand the populations attitude towards people with a disability.

She does this using case studies of disability hate crime, some familiar and notorious, most specifically to the UK. These case studies contain deeply disturbing crimes interjected with psychologically researched reflections on the most unpleasant parts of the human condition and psyche.
The book begins with heavy, but simply and humanly presented research on the origins of our prejudice against disabled people. An example of this could be the parallels drawn between Plato and Hitler,
"Plato argues: `we must...mate the best of our men with the
best of our women as often as possible', a reminder of Hitler's
obsession with the Aryan children and his experiment,
Lebensborn, to breed a master race."

Quarmby moves through decades and centuries; Romans, eugenics and disability exploitation, arriving at the present day, and the media's obsession, therefore society's obsession, with the `body beautiful'. Although discussed in-depth, the writer skilfully presents the information in an accessible and easy to read way.

The middle of the book, the largest element, looks at and specifically analyses real case studies of disability hate crimes. These are deeply unsettling crimes, many of which you may recall from the tabloid and news reports. Quarmby comes into her own here, successfully avoiding `Daily Mailesque' sensationalism and exploitative scaremongering showing how things have improved in many ways, but we still have a long...very long, way to go.
The books conclusion focuses on potential for the eventual `removal' of the disability hate crime mentality. The vanquishing and future of disability hate crime is less assured than this however, and one fears the overall outcome will be the unchanging condition of the human race. Quarmby does encourage the already supportive nature of many charities that promote awareness and provide support. Luckily well in the past now, Aristotle himself wrote,
"...babies born disabled should not be reared."
(Aristotle, the Poetics, 350 B.C.E.

She does also believe that society has been practically encouraged to discriminate against disabled people. At one stage she mentions governments encouraging people who receive benefits to be looked down on by society as scroungers. Despite all this mighty opposition to the eradication of hate crime against the disabled, she does think it's possible to get there, and we are making progress towards it. Fingers crossed...........
Not a `happy book', but it is so well done it is very relevant and important. At times making for potentially upsetting & difficult reading, this book is however extremely well researched & almost academic while still retaining a very human & respectful stance, never veering into the sensationalistic or exploitative. Despite the unpleasant nature of the books topic, it is never anything less than a totally compulsive read. Scapegoat: Why We Are Failing Disabled People
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 2 July 2011
This book is shocking, in parts horrific, but always readable.
Not only does Katharine Quarmby show empathy with the survivors and victims of disability hate crime, but she is also able to step back and deliver an insightful and clear-headed analysis of what needs to be done.
She has written an honest book, and has refused to duck the difficult and sensitive questions that float around this most troubling of issues.
Her tireless research provides the necessary historical context, and highlights the parallels between today's hateful, vicious and brutal crimes and the atrocities and outrages of the past.
Crucially, Scapegoat is also beautifully-written. It is not just a book for disabled activists, academics and professionals; it is also for anyone interested in seeking an insight into one of the most urgent problems facing our society.
I should point out that I was working with Katharine when she began investigating disability hate crime, and that she and I have subsequently supported each other with our respective projects, so I like to think I am well placed to know how much work, commitment and journalistic talent has gone into this book.
It is indeed a groundbreaking piece of work, and I suspect one that will be essential reading for years to come. I would be surprised if it was not soon on the reading-list of every disability studies course in the country.
I also know how much of herself Katharine has invested in her research, and how committed she is to supporting the survivors of these crimes and to finding a solution.
I can only agree with Tom Shakespeare: this may be the most important book you will read all year.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 15 July 2011
The best, most concise and accessible account I have read regarding the treatment of people with learning difficulties, and other disabled people. It challenges all those who would argue that disabled people are not hated in our society and cuts to the heart of the apalling treatment we continue to mete out instititionally at Winterbourne View, Budeock Hospital . . . and individually, in the apalling examples of mate crimes such as the torture and murder of Steven Hoskin. Katherine's approach places such examples within a firm historical context, which mean that sadly we should not be surprised that such things happen, but should be horrified that we continue to let them. The many Inquiries following the recent Panorama expose will tell us yet again what we already know, but not why we fail to act. This book offers an insight into the latter, and acts as a spur to all those fighting for human rights.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 4 August 2011
Scapegoat: Why We Are Failing Disabled People
This book is one everybody should be made to read. For many years the scale of active discimination experienced by disabled people has been largely hidden. The author, who for many years worked in the disability press movement, has been perfectly placed to study, investigate and write about the way in which disabled people in this country (and elsewhere) are treated - or more accurately mistreated - as an underclass and/or as scroungers on the benefits system. This book shines a light on the only group in society where some people make a living by keeping others repressed, dependent and often in fear of the prejudices of society. This is a really excellent exposé and should be compulsory reading for every social worker or senior health professional.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 13 December 2013
As a sociological examination of Broken Britain's vexatious attitudes towards disability, Katharine Quarmby has written a very serious investigation into heinous crimes against the most vulnerable in society, as well as documenting the institutional failings of those whose job it is to safeguard them.

Quarmby has admirably left no stone unturned in excavating the social origins of disability hate crimes, dedicating chapters to events and attitudes from classical times to medieval witch hunts that murdered disabled people on grounds of suspected Satanism. There is also accounts on distorted academic movements like eugenics giving rise to disabled people becoming the formative victims of the Nazi Holocaust, while progressive nations like America legislated a so-called `Ugly Law' that prohibited disabled people the right to be seen in public places because they were deemed undesirable citizens (a policy that was upheld in some states until the mid-1970s). The book comes right up to date by exploring the worrying attitudes of British Asian communities with regards to disability, and rightfully criticises the current Tory-Lib Dem coalition party's attempts to fuel public disdain towards disabled communities by labelling them a societal burden that has created huge welfare deficits.

It would have been very easy for Quarmby to have made this book a simple case study of harrowing crimes against disabled people, of which there are many. She, however, uses such crimes as a means of investigating wider social ills, regularly contextualising her arguments by balancing empirical evidence with her own astute analysis of how such problems materialise in the first place.

While one wishes more prudence had been taken with proofreading and structural aspects of the book, Quarmby has written something that has a great deal on its mind and strives to get people to think about where we are in Britain right now. When all her key polemics are distilled, Quarmby is fundamentally asking for better integration and understanding from all sides, including those within the disabled community that fight for the rights of those with physical impairments without championing the needs of those with learning disabilities, the latter often being the very ones that get targeted in extreme hate crime cases.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 12 August 2011
An excellent read and social study of society over the ages. The book should be an essential read for all professionals and educators involved with the shaping of services for vulnerable people with disabilities. The author sets out challenges to society at a pertinent time for communities in 2011.
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