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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Aircraft disasters revealed
For anyone who is interested in aircraft disasters (and who isn't - go on admit it!) this book is a real treat. The technical level is just right, ie enough but not overwhelming. And the issue of blame is fairly and intelligently argued. It makes a fascinating read - as good as any novel! It ought to be compulsory reading for everyone in the industry! BTW, the...
Published on 28 Aug. 2010 by M. Graley

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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Friday afternoon job
This otherwise good book has been ruined by poor editing. The whole book is riddled with mistakes, which are easy to ignore at first, but eventually become tiresome. Was it ever proof-read? - Or just rushed out to make a fast buck. Wait and see whether they bring out a new, corrected version - And then buy it.
Published on 12 Oct. 2010 by J. Rankin


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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Aircraft disasters revealed, 28 Aug. 2010
By 
M. Graley (South Bucks, UK) - See all my reviews
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For anyone who is interested in aircraft disasters (and who isn't - go on admit it!) this book is a real treat. The technical level is just right, ie enough but not overwhelming. And the issue of blame is fairly and intelligently argued. It makes a fascinating read - as good as any novel! It ought to be compulsory reading for everyone in the industry! BTW, the companion volume "The Flying Dictionary" by the same author is equally good - one of the few dictionaries that make a good read in themselves!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, strangely fascinating to the lay reader; should be read by the professionals, 2 Nov. 2011
For anyone who has ever wondered about the amazing combination of human skill and technology involved in flying aircraft (and we should, given how often we use air travel), this book is fascinating. For once we look beyond the standard utterances heard when there is a crash. Who has not wondered what is NOT being said about airplane crashes, and just what do we mean by 'the human factor'?

There is nothing sensationalist in this book; rather a sober and extremely thorough examination of some 'other' factors that play a role in the long chain of events that unfortunately can lead up to a crash. Some of these "other", or supposedly "lesser" factors are the ability to understand standard aviation terminology by all, regardless of accent and stress levels, the effective communication between crew members with their culturally embedded hangups (typically lines of authority, the ability to question authority, override mechanisms, etc.).

What I found particularly fascinating in this book is the realization that regardless of techical skill levels, so much hinges on effective communication. In other words, a crew can be superior in terms of technical ability and training, but poor in terms of how they actually communicate with one another. That goes counter our notion of how crews work, and yet it is brillantly documented in this book.
Although pilots and the avaiation industry like to believe that "standard aviation terminology" is absolutely universal and leaves no room for misinterpretation, that would be true in an ideal world. But pilots are human beings and carry deep cultural imprints that influence their behavior, especially under duress.
We may have stereotypes in our heads about so called 'third world' airlines, but many of these stereotypes involve technical skill levels more than cultural attitudes that may get in the way of operational efficiency. Training to acquire technical skills is one thing; addressing issues of communication, cooperation, working for the better good, being able to develop discipline but not only through blind obediance to manuals or one's superior, are harder to define, quantify and refer to when analysing an accident.

Then there is the question of just how well international crews actually understand English, even if it is (supposedly) made up of strictly identified words and phrases that have been drilled into pilots' heads. How about accents? Have you noticed how hard it is to understand something in a foreign languqge that you know well enough when you are under stress or there are other factors getting in the way?
Some of these issues have been identified in connection with the crashes that the author reviews, and hopefully been given the attention they deserve in appropriate quarters. The issue of how well do we actually communicate in the globalized world, with increased levels of technical knowhow, less and less time to do more, and all of this in proto-English, goes beyong the world of aviation. But in aviation it can have disastrous consequences.

[This reviewer, when working in a war zone, flew on planes with non-native English speaking crews with varied cultural backgrounds, and is familiar with the aviation world in a non-English speaking emerging economy where she lived for 10 years].
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Air Crash Investigation on my Kindle, 17 April 2013
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This review is from: AIR CRASHES AND MIRACLE LANDINGS -- Sixty Narratives (Kindle Edition)
I fly about twice a year but reading this does in no way put me off flying, on the contrary it reminds me that despite lives lost the industry learns from these incidents to ensure that they do not happen again. Very interesting, a comprehensive list of the main accidents in recent years, fully explained in layman's terms. I love "Aircrash Investigation" if you like that you will love this, it goes back to the Amelia Earhart mystery of 1937 and also the Comet 4 incidents and development. All aspects covered ie. Loss of power over water. Runway overruns. Mid air collisions & TCAS. Fire & smoke. Fly by wire. Metal fatigue. Turbulence. Military incidents. Ground collisions, and many more. Very enjoyable reading.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great "Wot Dun It", 23 Mar. 2011
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Mr. C. Bradford (UK) - See all my reviews
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I got this for my brother-in-law. He works in the aviation industry and said it was great. My sister isn't, and has never shown any interest in such things, and even she liked it. Who'd have thought?!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not to be missed at the shelves of any Aviation ..., 26 July 2014
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Not to be missed at the shelves of any Aviation Safety organization . A MUST READ for professional of this area .
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Friday afternoon job, 12 Oct. 2010
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J. Rankin (North East England) - See all my reviews
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This otherwise good book has been ruined by poor editing. The whole book is riddled with mistakes, which are easy to ignore at first, but eventually become tiresome. Was it ever proof-read? - Or just rushed out to make a fast buck. Wait and see whether they bring out a new, corrected version - And then buy it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 28 Feb. 2013
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Can't put this book down, a must for anyone interested in aviation disasters. The author talks in detail about each incident but more interestingly gives his own opinions
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5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome Seller!, 5 Feb. 2015
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Excellent book, finished in one night. Speedy delivery, well packaged & reasonably priced.
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A well-balanced, technical review of air crashes? Sadly not., 18 Sept. 2011
By 
G. Gilpin "Geoff" (Northamptonshire) - See all my reviews
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I am sorry to say that I have little good to say about this book. Right from the start, the author's rather abrasive and opinionated style put me off: he is no fan of pilots as a breed (referring in one case to "our "hero""). The pilot who ditched into the Hudson River is given reluctant praise - it was his job after all, and the ditching was pretty easy. And anyway, he was saving himself as well.

The text is peppered with mistakes; the diagrams are poor; a bulletted list is left incomplete; a diagram is referred to but is missing; United Airlines changes its flight code to "AA"; the Manchester incident "just described" is in the following chapter etc. On top of that, you are supposed to buy the glossary as a separate book - what a cheat.

Personally, I don't think the tabloid style goes with the subject matter.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars so far the most readable book on the subject, 13 May 2013
By 
Budcus (South Coast) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: AIR CRASHES AND MIRACLE LANDINGS -- Sixty Narratives (Kindle Edition)
Quite a few air crashes in this book, some that caught the public eye and many that didn't. One thing that is highlighted is the reliance by modern pilots on the technology and what happens when that technology breaks down and the full responsibility falls back on the pilot who is nowadays more of a technician than an instinctive pilot.

Nevertheless it is a point worth making that even allowing for the increase in size and passenger numbers, air travel is safer in these modern planes than it was when the pilot actually flew the plane.

What I really liked about this book was the links to a website and ongoing links to other relevant material. A cyber based book about a cyber based industry and I can see two things ahead. First that Kindle Books might well place diagrams and even pics on a separate website so that readers can read narrative and see relevant illustrations at the same time and that within a few years there will be fully robotic freight planes in the sky.
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