Customer Reviews


341 Reviews
5 star:
 (237)
4 star:
 (80)
3 star:
 (12)
2 star:
 (8)
1 star:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


124 of 128 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Fat Dutchman Steals the Show.
This was clearly a very personal project for director/producer/writer Emilio Estevez, who drafted in the heavyweight services of his father Martin Sheen for their third collaboration together. Estevez clearly has plenty of talent which he displays with this well intentioned if a little predictable affair. Thankfully the films earnestness, its good humour, and the...
Published on 10 Nov 2011 by Bob Salter

versus
20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Lacked something
What would I have liked to know before I bought it? Others have described the plot, basically a man completing the long journey on which his adult son had died, meeting other characters etc, overcoming disasters and finding something in himself. On the plus side, the cinematography was good, with some nice atmospheric scenic shots; the music was pleasing and in keeping,...
Published on 20 Nov 2011 by Will Mac


‹ Previous | 1 235 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

124 of 128 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Fat Dutchman Steals the Show., 10 Nov 2011
By 
Bob Salter "Captain Spindrift" (Wiltshire, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Way [DVD] (DVD)
This was clearly a very personal project for director/producer/writer Emilio Estevez, who drafted in the heavyweight services of his father Martin Sheen for their third collaboration together. Estevez clearly has plenty of talent which he displays with this well intentioned if a little predictable affair. Thankfully the films earnestness, its good humour, and the characters who you begin to warm to as they trudge their way along the Camino de Santiago a famous Spanish pilgrimage route, steer the film away from the well of tearful sentiment it could have plunged headlong into. The recent Australian film "The Tree" cleverly used a giant fig tree as the metaphor for grief. In this film it is all about the journey, and although it is all on foot, this is a road journey if ever there was one.

In the film Martin Sheen's son, played by Estevez himself in flashback, dies whilst attempting to make the great pilgrimage. Eye surgeon Sheen flys from the comfort of his Californian home to France to collect the ashes. Sheen never able to fully understand his sons philosophy towards life, "you don't choose a life, you live one", decides to complete the walk himself for his dead son, and in the process gain a better understanding of his only child. Along the way he meets an assortment of characters. A fat Dutchman walking the route to lose weight so that his wife will sleep with him again. An irritating Irish author played by James Nesbitt, and a Canadian divorcee played by Deborah Kara Unger who suffered past brutality at the hands of a cruel husband. The typical sort of mixed bunch in need of a bit of redemption, which they duly receive along the way. Dutch actor Yorick Van Waginingen shamelessly steals the show as the fat Dutchman, with laugh out loud comments like "if its not Dutch its not much". Those Dutch get everywhere, and yes they do have a great sense of humour. He is utterly convincing as the kind hearted man who just can't keep a secret. Apart from his overblown entrance, Nesbitt is also very good and shows a fair hand at baton twirling on the journey. Hollywood legend Sheen lives up to his big reputation as the reticent moody widower who gradually opens up to those around him. Real life Canuck Deborah Unger holds her own in such strong alpha male company.

The film is well shot, clearly on location, and runs for around the two hour mark, which is a good length of time to warm to the characters. Although I am not a Catholic, the walk itself looked very appealing. Perhaps a little harder than the Cotswold Way, which is the last one I did? A few more blisters in this film might have added realism! The film cleverly fuses the old world with the new. Hence we have grand old churches and a modern wind farm mixed in together. Watching the wind turbines was a strong reminder of Don Quixotes tilting at windmills, which was probably why Estevez included them. How can you not fail to like walkers who sensibly take a break from spartan accommodation to luxuriate in a height of opulence parador. Now these are my kind of walkers! The films good humour and good intentions won me over. On my next curry/film night with the lads, they are quite old lads now, this one may well get another airing. Both entertaining and thought provoking which is a winning combination.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


92 of 97 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Buen Camino, 27 July 2011
By 
This review is from: The Way [DVD] (DVD)
I thoroughly enjoyed "The Way". It is the story of an American father (Martin Sheen) who goes to Europe to collect the body of his son, who has been killed in an accident while starting the pilgrimage known as "The Camino de Santiago". The "Camino" starts in France and finishes in North Western Spain.

He decides to finish the route with his son's ashes. I feared that the movie would be too sentimental for my liking but this is not the case.

Thanks to some excellent acting and a well-written script we get to see into the lives of Sheen's character and the companions he meets along the way. They are all doing the pilgrimage for their own reasons but the movie never becomes maudlin as it explains their stories.

A lot of credit must go to Sheen's son, Emilio Estevez, who directed and wrote the story.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


97 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring and uplifting film from the Sheen family, 19 July 2011
By 
Rowena Hoseason "Hooligween" (Kernow, Great Britain) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Way [DVD] (DVD)
This could have been a sloppily sentimental, mawkish Hollywood movie. Or it could have been a deeply depressing European art-house film full of bitter regret. Instead, `The Way' veers to neither extreme and treads a careful path somewhere in between.
`The Way' examines the nature of pilgrimage, the father-son bond, interaction between strangers, the reality of loss and how different people deal with it, and how new friendships can develop from the most harsh moments in life. The first act is extremely moving, as Martin Sheen's character struggles to cope with his son's sudden death. The father is wrenched from his comfortable middle-class life in suburban American, hurled into motion by the news that his wayward 30-something son has died while undertaking an extreme pilgrimage on foot across 500 miles of Spanish mountains.
From then, the rural landscape becomes one of the central characters in the film; harsh, beautiful, threatening, supportive - and sensitively captured and revealed in a series of segments which follow Sheen's footsteps through rain, shine and suffering. He's joined by other pilgrims on the trail and encounters a cross-section of humanity at way-stations along the route.
`The Way' isn't entirely free of cultural stereotypes, So the Dutch pilgrim carries half a pharmacy of recreational chemicals around with him; the Irish writer is a fast-talking braggart; the gypsies dance by firelight and lean toward light-fingered habits but underneath are a sensitive, honourable people, and so on. But the Americans laugh at themselves, and the grieving father isn't portrayed as a kind of saint; his feet are made of clay, too. And he's man enough to admit it.

At the final resolution, `The Way' offers an affirmation of lives worth living, of the value of the journey for itself rather than mere dashing to a destination. It captures several moments of startling sorrow, and Sheen's performance should not be missed. But this is not a po-faced movie about religion, nor a self-indulgent dirge. There are plenty of lighter moments of laughter (and James Nesbitt gets one of the best introductory speeches we'd heard in a long while).
The delicate scenes between (real life) father and son Sheen and director Estevez are extremely poignant, too. They perfectly capture the intimate yet distant relationship between the generations.
Definitely a film not to miss.

9/10
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Way to Salvation, 20 Jan 2012
This review is from: The Way [DVD] (DVD)
This is a most inspiring film which shows that in tragedy we can find solutions in the most unexpected places. In this film the father walks in the footsteps of his lost son, and meets people who in the normal course of his life he would have had no time for. The walk is a metaphor for our journey in life - that we often find ourselves on paths not of our choosing - but with a steadfast manner and an open heart we can reach salvation for our inner turmoil and put those parts of our lives that trouble us into perspective.
This is the story of all Pilgrims across the ages.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful film - moving and uplifting., 1 Dec 2011
By 
Mr. E. Parry - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Way [DVD] (DVD)
The Way is my favourite release this year so far.

I originally went to see it at the cinema as I had some time on my hand and was there for a coffee. I looked at the film schedule and read the synposis. As I like Martin Sheen and James Nesbitt in almost everything I have seen them do I went in. I was also aware of the old pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela with its history and underground conspiracy theory histories. I am not at all religious but I am interested and wanted to see the sights along The Way.

The countryside, and the filming of it, is fabulous. The storyline is full of clever wit. It has pathos and is uplifting as the four main characters unveil more about themselves as the journey progresses. You cannot fail to me moved and uplifted by this great film
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Film!, 23 Oct 2011
By 
Nobody "Knows" - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Way [DVD] (DVD)
Watched this film in a near empty cinema, I think there were seven people there, on its opening night. And then after a week it was gone. Wonderful film, story and acting. And a cracking score to boot. I won't tell you about the story, buy the DVD and enjoy it for yourself. Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Lacked something, 20 Nov 2011
This review is from: The Way [DVD] (DVD)
What would I have liked to know before I bought it? Others have described the plot, basically a man completing the long journey on which his adult son had died, meeting other characters etc, overcoming disasters and finding something in himself. On the plus side, the cinematography was good, with some nice atmospheric scenic shots; the music was pleasing and in keeping, and the plot suggested it should be interesting. However, rather disappointingly, both the characters and plot lacked depth and several of the scenes were clichéd (I'm afraid the scene towards the end, outside the cathedral of Santiago, where they are all smiling to each other, was more reminiscent of Disney). The Martin Sheen character (Tom) was realistic but the lines he was given lacked something. The Character of Jack (James Nesbitt) was just too irritating, Jan was ok (but every Dutchman will probably hate the 'drugs and liberalism' cliché) but fortunately the scenes were often rescued by Sarah (Deborah Unger) with some deeper thoughts and occasional angst (e.g. Boomer scene). Quite interestingly, almost when you think the credits are starting, ie the very final few seconds opened a different window.
None of this means that it's not worth watching but we were disappointed that it missed the good opportunity that the story line suggested.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


30 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Camino de Santiago, 22 Aug 2011
By 
A. Bibby "Big Al" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Way [DVD] (DVD)
I have completed the Camino de Santiago twice over the past 8 years, so going along to see this film was really quite daunting. Surely it couldn't match the real thing; an 800 km walk across France & Spain, sometimes in the blistering heat of the Meseta, sometimes in the torrential downpours of Galicia?

It couldn't possibly give any idea of the type of camaraderie that buids up along the way?
Could it give any insight into the love/hate relationships that develop? Could it give any clue at all of the majestic scenery allong the way?

Could it give any insight into the levels of despair & the heights of euphoria that afflict all pilgrims. The odd characters & situations that one meets along the Way?

Could it give any idea at all of what it is to be a pilgrim in todays world?

Well I am glad to say that the film really did deliver & answered all these questions, positively. As always Martin Sheen is wonderful, the scenery is awesome & the story line is engaging. I came away from the film itching to start planning my next visit to Spain & my next Camino. If there is anyone out there contemplating the Camino, then watch this film; it's closer to reality than any guidebook.

Buen Camino!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buy The Way, 30 Mar 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Way [DVD] (DVD)
I have been to Santiago and the Pyrenees, and seen many of the towns the pilgrims pass through. I have wanted to do the walk with my husband for some time. This delightful film has lovely footage of the scenery of the area as well as a strong plot to keep everyone entertained. The characters playing off against each other show their love /hate, compulsions/ irritations/ and their occasional need for companionship/ privacy from fellow pilgrims - it all adds up to an intriguing journey for the viewer. It has excited my interest in doing the walk all over again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All about us, 11 Feb 2012
By 
W. Rodick (Cheshire, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Way [DVD] (DVD)
I watched my own dvd of every photograph which has me in it entitled 'My Life in Pictures 1962 - 2004' before viewing The Way this evening and then settling down to write this appraisal. After viewing my dvd I was struck by how many people I used to be. Not just the faces of me, that I now identify, but the lives I have been. The people who shared. The communities we have been.

As I watched Martin Sheen's journey I was reminded of the journeys I've taken, the smiles I've captured and the warmth which caused me to grow. And the anxieties we leave behind. In the next few weeks I must write a four thousand word essay about 'gated communities' for a degree. There is a writer on Sheen's trek, I little too florid for me but his heart is in the right place and I'm sure his Irishness had one scene inspired by Godot. That's the thing with travelling; it opens the soul to the immediate and now, removing the habits of time and the lie of comforts. Free.

The conceits and the facades are gradually dissipated by the characters who embark upon The Way. Welcomed by strangers each with their own hidden lives, only the impermanence of passing faces brings out our better sides. And, of course, the joy of all that sunshine upon an uncluttered landscape easily frees the mind of shames.

Don't be surprised by all the music. It does travel with you and not always requiring batteries. This is a film about travelling. It may seem to be something of a whim for Tom (Sheen's character) but I understood his reasoning. He had the will, if not the gloves. It is life enhancing, to the point where you can never really be alone again. Some call it by a religion's name. I feel it in each step we take.

What I can not understand is why people build walls around themselves and call it community. The trough gets deeper. Rigid faces are lonely places. There is no written constitution for living. Only life. As best you can.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 235 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Way [DVD]
The Way [DVD] by Emilio Estevez (DVD - 2011)
5.19
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews